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PICList Thread
'UV-eraser'
1998\12\16@155614 by Goovaerts

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Does anyone know why this happens :

I erased my PIC16C63 with an UV-eraser for about 40 MINUTES !!!!! Still it
isn't blank. I can't get rid off the configuration bytes !!

Maybe leave the PIC longer in the eraser ???

Glenn

1998\12\16@161437 by dave vanhorn

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-----BEGIN PGP SIGNED MESSAGE-----
Hash: SHA1


>I erased my PIC16C63 with an UV-eraser for about 40 MINUTES !!!!! Still it
>isn't blank. I can't get rid off the configuration bytes !!

Use a tissue and alcohol to clean the window. Dirt, finger grease, and
sticker remains are not

-----BEGIN PGP SIGNATURE-----
Version: PGP for Personal Privacy 5.5.5
Comment: Trust them, they're from the government!  (NOT!)

iQA/AwUBNngh4Et+LG8vnBoNEQICJACg0A5CDkMOivmd/pTv39l4vwS6P34AoKcb
HjJld0fbzRvGUV1tT5eFjcJf
=LmQ3
-----END PGP SIGNATURE-----

1998\12\17@103257 by Vadim

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Hi,

Someone erased PIC flash, which is used in photographies?

Beg Pardon for english. This not my native language.

VADIM spam_OUTvadTakeThisOuTspamanet.lv

1998\12\18@062901 by Adriano De Minicis

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Vadim wrote:

> Someone erased PIC flash, which is used in photographies?

I suppose your question may be interpreted as:
"Has someone erased a PIC using a photocamera's flash lamp?"

I'm not a lamp expert, but in my opinion the UV emission of a
camera flash lamp is probably very low (UVs hurt eyes).

However, there are on the market some EPROM erasers that use a UV
Xenon lamp to erase very quickly an EPROM. I have a brochure
of one of them. It's gun-shaped, the erasure time is between
2 and 30 seconds.

Adriano

1998\12\18@063313 by Quentin

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Got a URL? Or give us the name, so we can search.

Thanks
Quentin

Adriano De Minicis wrote:

{Quote hidden}

1998\12\18@131322 by wwl

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On Fri, 18 Dec 1998 13:32:49 +0200, you wrote:

{Quote hidden}

I have one from Dataman (UK). It seems to take a lot longer to erase
pics than eproms - 30 to 60 secs versus about 10 for most modern
eproms. I don't know if it's still in production. They probably have a
website - shouldn't be too hard to find.

On the subject of flashes, a photo flash WILL temporarily disrupt a
system running code from an eprom (external or on-board), from a
surprisingly long distance away in some cases. The intense light
temporarily disrupts the read amplifiers, causing read errors.
Moral - cover eprom windows well when exhibiting at shows, or
anywhere that people might be taking pictures :-)

1998\12\18@133402 by Quentin

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part 0 47 bytes
<P>Quentin</HTML>

</x-html>

1998\12\18@152615 by William Chops Westfield

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   If this Xenon UV guns are so fast, why don't they use it in tabletop
   erasers?

"real" xenon discharge lamps are very expensive.  Cheap ones have a short
lifetime.  There's an interesting market out there in "what can I build
using the flash circuitry from disposable cameras, which are available
"pre-disposed" for free at many film processing stores."  So far, I've seen:

CD firing box for pyrotechnics.
"Glow-in-the-dark toy" recharging box for kids.
EPROM eraser (not sure on this one.)

(rumor has it that the cheap flashes use glass tubes (rather than quartz),
which will absorb some UV, and the plastic filter/lense will remove some
more, so the flash itself COULD contain significant UV.)

BillW

1998\12\18@153504 by Martin McCormick

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Quentin writes:
>If this Xenon UV guns are so fast, why don't they use it in tabletop
>erasers?
       I have only actually used one such device and that was several
years ago, but there is a catch, all right.  You can only zap three
or four Eproms before either the power supply or the flash tube gets
too hot to continue.  At that point, a safety shut-down operates and
nothing happens until it cools back down 5 or 10 minutes later.  It's
fine for one or two erasures, but the UV lamps based on fluorescent
light technology are best for extended periods of use.

       We used to have a guy in our group who had lots of
intelligence but not much common sense.  One day, he wanted to see
what the strobe looked like so he depressed both interlocks and then
fired the eraser at the room.  He reported a series of brilliant
purple flashes.  I guess he got lucky and didn't catch any direct
reflections off of any shiny surfaces.  Let's just take his word for
what it looked like.

Martin McCormick WB5AGZ  Stillwater, OK
OSU Center for Computing and Information Services Data Communications Group

1998\12\18@155124 by paulb

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William Chops Westfield wrote:

> There's an interesting market out there in "what can I build using the
> flash circuitry from disposable cameras, which are available
> "pre-disposed" for free at many film processing stores."

> CD firing box for pyrotechnics.
> "Glow-in-the-dark toy" recharging box for kids.
> EPROM eraser (not sure on this one.)

 Are these just odd things you've heard, or was there a discussion on
this somewhere?
--
 Cheers,
       Paul B.

1998\12\19@092910 by Adriano De Minicis

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Hi Quentin,

> > However, there are on the market some EPROM erasers that use a UV
> > Xenon lamp to erase very quickly an EPROM. I have a brochure
> > of one of them. It's gun-shaped, the erasure time is between
> > 2 and 30 seconds.
>
> Got a URL? Or give us the name, so we can search.

That brochure was very old... (about 7-8 yrs ago). The eraser was
a "Flash eraser II" made by "Bron Electronique SA" (I'm not sure,
but seems to be a Swiss company). It was distributed in Italy by
Technolasa Elettronica (http://www.technolasa.com)

I've done a quick search on the web, but I can't find Bron
Electronique.

Adriano

1998\12\20@111801 by Peter L. Peres

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On Fri, 18 Dec 1998, Quentin wrote:

> Thanks
> Now my next (obvious) question is:
> If this Xenon UV guns are so fast, why don't they use it in tabletop
> erasers?



Xenon bulbs have a very limited lifetime and are expensive for cont. use.

Peter


'UV-eraser'
2003\01\11@103828 by 4HAZ
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Try the new U.V. LEDs mount it in a clip to chip fashion.
As for erasure time, try erasing a device in the programming socket,
time how long it takes for bits to start disappearing
(verify programming repeatedly until -fail-)
then multiply this time by 5 to give the total erase time.

http://www.led.net/

http://www.led.net/datasheets/Pages/led_color_chart/38.htm

Lonnie - KF4HAZ -

----- From: "Eke Neehr" <ake.neehr@
Hello!

I want to make me an own UV-eraserbox
to the PIC/JW chip but I don4t have the
right knowledge. Have looked at the webb
but don4t find anything.
Therefore I4m trying this way, so please
if You have any addresses let me know.

In the meantime: Which is the right wavelength
and is there any rules between effect (W)
and the time it takes to erase the chip ?

Regards
EkeN

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2003\01\11@124322 by Wagner Lipnharski

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Åke Neehr wrote:
> Hello!
>
> I want to make me an own UV-eraserbox
> to the PIC/JW chip but I don´t have the
> right knowledge. Have looked at the webb
> but don´t find anything.
> Therefore I´m trying this way, so please
> if You have any addresses let me know.
>
> In the meantime: Which is the right wavelength
> and is there any rules between effect (W)
> and the time it takes to erase the chip ?
>
> Regards
> ÅkeN


Just some info;

Probably you already heard of germicide lamps. You can buy them at several
places over the net, probably NOT available at the grocery store at the
corner, since those lamps are quite special.  Germicide lamps are made to
kill bacteria and germs, that die easily under UV exposure.  They are used
in beauty parlors to sterilize their tools.

Those lamps have a CRYSTAL body, not GLASS as the ordinary fluorescent
lamps.  This is because ordinary glass messes up with the UV transport and
blocks much of it.  Crystal allows much more UV to go ahead, so the effect
is stronger.

This is also why those common BLACK fluorescents and bulbs don't erase
eproms, since their body is made of ordinary glass, even so, a little part
of UV crosses it and hit white clothes giving the effect.

The germicide lamp is nothing more than a regular simple and ordinary
fluorescent lamp, but without the internal white powder (phosphor) and with
crystal body. That's all.

A regular fluorescent lamp creates an electron flow thru the argon gas,
when the electrons collide with the mercury vapor it generates ultra-violet
light.  The UV then hit the white powder phosphor coating, and this
reaction creates visible light.

Without the phosphor white coating, the UV gets out the crystal body and
tan skin (also causing skin cancer), damage your eye cornea, change carpet
and lots of other things color, kill bacteria and germs, and also, erase
eproms.

The electrical connection for a germicide lamp is quite simple as a regular
fluorescent lamp.
Once you get the lamp, just go to HOME DEPOT and find all the necessary
parts there, at the electrical department, the lamp sockets, reactor,
starter and wires.  If you dig right, probably will find a nice metallic or
plastic case to enclose it all.

The electric diagram can be found at my webpage
www.ustr.net/electronics/fluorescent.shtml
make the PREHEAT CIRCUIT, since the starter only consume lamp filaments
during the initial turn on.
Some other designs that keep the filaments connected all the time shorten
the lamp life.

The reactor, starter, sockets and wires will cost no more than $5, but the
lamp itself will cost around $15 or more in specialized places.

I always wonder to bring from overseas a box of such lamps to sell at my
website, since I have a nice price supplier overseas, but never found
motivation and a preview of sales volume to justify.

Be careful to NEVER look directly to the lamp when on.  Look to the UV
reflection is ok, mostly if the reflection is done in not shinning
surfaces.

If you plan to build the eraser into a box, make sure to calculate the
spaces correctly, the eprom or microchip should be as close as possible
directly under the lamp, 5mm to 10mm is ok, but it needs to be exactly
below the lamp, not 10mm aside, so the UV enters directly into the chip.

Make sure to install everything into the box, and when to use turn it
upside down over a table and eprom, so nobody will be blind in the future.

A nifty way to build an "ON" indicator, is just collecting some fluorescent
lamp white powder (phosphor) from a broken lamp (careful) and find a way to
easy glue them over an acrylic disc (spray glue then pour the phosphor and
blow off excess phosphor), then you will have a nice piece of acrylic that
will turn bright white light under UV exposure (to the powder side).  Then
open a hole at the top (bottom) of the box and glue the acrylic disc by
inside - phosphor to inside.  Then, when the lamp is in use, you will have
a bright white spot ON at the box... that is a nice trick, it beats NEON
lamp indicator...

:)

Wagner.

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