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PICList Thread
'TOO DIFFICULT TO DECIDE: please help'
2000\02\09@184712 by Gianni Freiles

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<x-flowed>Hello to everybody.
I'm a newcomer to PIC programming and I'm seeking for advice.
I've been programming embedded systems in medical products under 6502, Z80,
68000, 68332 and just recently I'm getting back to it.
I'm somewhat confused after some days of searching through the web for a
micro that would fit my application, Tickit, PIC, TIGER and so on.

Let me try to explain what I need and see if any of you guys can help.

My application requires the following:

- 8 channel serial ADC 8-10 bits (MAX186, MAX192 ??) with about 2 KHz
sampling rate
- 12-16 bit general I/O
- RS232 serial communication
- LCD 2 x 24 characters (serial, I2C, 8 bit bus ???)
- Possibility of reprogramming the software without extracting any chip
(RS232, other serial communication ??)
- MIDI communication (31.25 K, is that possible on PICs ?)
- PIC CPU (which model??)
- Battery operated

Development system:
- C compiler (CCS ??)
Do I need a startup kit or you advice to start from scratch with a
prototyping board? Any self made project?
I would hate to burn software with a programmer before trying software
changes.

I was convinced on PICs mainly because of the quality of the PICLIST web
site. Thanks to all of you for sharing your work.

Gianni



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</x-flowed>

2000\02\09@190209 by Quitt, Walter

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Do I hear a vote for the 16F877?????
Excepting the MIDI, I'm just about postive you can
do all of that stuff.  With the built in ADC, FLASH
and extra I/O I know I could probably get his job
done.  Maybe better (quicker) in ASM.  But with
the ICD and it's prototype board (US $159 total,)
it would get him down the road fast.
Walt

{Original Message removed}

2000\02\09@191231 by Don McKenzie

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Gianni Freiles wrote:
>
> Hello to everybody.
> I'm a newcomer to PIC programming and I'm seeking for advice.
> I've been programming embedded systems in medical products under 6502, Z80,
> 68000, 68332 and just recently I'm getting back to it.
> I'm somewhat confused after some days of searching through the web for a
> micro that would fit my application, Tickit, PIC, TIGER and so on.
>
> Let me try to explain what I need and see if any of you guys can help.
>
> My application requires the following:

sounds very close to the dt106 pcb
http://www.dontronics.com/dt106.html
a good start i would think.

Don McKenzie    spam_OUTdonTakeThisOuTspamdontronics.com      http://www.dontronics.com

World's Largest Range of Atmel/AVR and  PICmicro Hardware and  Software.
Free Basic Compiler and Programmer http://www.dontronics.com/runavr.html

2000\02\09@192515 by Peter van Hoof

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Yes,

My vote is for the 877, not for the microchip ICD though,
I think the ICD from transdata with it's parallel port is a better choice
http://www.adv-transdata.com/in_system_debugger.htm

Peter



{Original Message removed}

2000\02\09@192650 by Glenn West

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Well you can ceertainly do pics or scenix (A pic clone). The scenix is my
current
favorite. Its a flash based, and offers a high-clock rate. 100Mhz.
Programming is
in circuit, along with debug.

The question always comes down to cost/perfomance/ease of development.

Pic  arch. is very powerful for the pricepoint, but sounds like your
application would
be better served by multiple pics if thats the choice, there so cheap its
no big deal.
That way you can put a part for each thing your interface, and communicate
with i2c.

Currently doing a "droplett" server, on a simm, its a scenix part with 2+
Megabytes of
flash and a ethernet connection. It will have a spare scenix part for pio
connection. Just add
the RJ45 jack. So shows the power. But you have to get used to coding "small".

I'll look at the 16F877, the question always is code size, and how tight
you code. My question
would be how big is the MIDI data, and the data analysis functions. Sounds
like your doing a
bio-feedback device, and may need to look at a second of data per channel,
that eats ram
likes its going out of style. So its really, how much ram you need that
drives, and how fast
do you need to access it. pics usually have very limited ram directly
accessable, 512 bytes to 1024, some
parts are as small as 128bytes (Notice there is no K in that). So you have
to think small. I've
done lots of projects with pics and you can do thinks you never thought
possible in very small sizes
but you have to think about it first. Nothing worst than running out of
memory before you start.


At 03:59 PM 2/9/00 -0800, you wrote:
>Do I hear a vote for the 16F877?????
>Excepting the MIDI, I'm just about postive you can
>do all of that stuff.  With the built in ADC, FLASH
>and extra I/O I know I could probably get his job
>done.  Maybe better (quicker) in ASM.  But with
>the ICD and it's prototype board (US $159 total,)
>it would get him down the road fast.
>Walt
>
>{Original Message removed}

2000\02\10@233743 by Donald L Burdette

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This looks like a lot for a single PIC to do.  Of course, you can use
external buffers, etc.  Or you can use multiple PIC's, but those flash
parts are still pretty expensive to be using more than one.

I'd look at Hitachi.  They've got some really nice flash parts available
now, with all the I/O you need, huge flash and RAM  (compared to PIC's)
and plenty of processing power including lots of 16-bit registers,
multiple 16-bit timers and UARTs, 8-channel A/D's, and hardware multiply
and divide.  Demo boards run $99-$199, and include the universal
in-circuit programmer which covers all their parts.  I'm told some of the
new parts are under $5.00.  Be careful when you choose a particular part.
Prices for nearly identical parts can be quite different, and some are
quite expensive.

The drawback is their tools are pricey.  Their in-circuit-debugger is way
better than Microchip's (it includes trace), but then it better be,
because the price is over $1000.  C-compiler is also in the same range,
but is also excellent.  I think their full emulator is around $6000,
unless you're using their 32-bit processors (as do most Windows CE
machines) and you need the emulator that's $15,000+.

I've also used a Tiny-Tiger.  For the price, it is an excellent product.
Learning curve was about 2 days, coding with their Basic was easy, and
the developers were available for tech support on phone and e-mail.  By
now, I expect that each of mine has tested about 50,000 production boards
with nary a glitch.  Drawback there is high unit cost.

Just didn't want your job to be too easy (;-)


Don

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