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'Quick-and-dirty electronics education'
1997\06\04@170131 by Mark G. Forbes

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1) Go to the bookstore (http://www.powells.portland.or.us) (http://www.amazon.com)
2) Buy "The Art of Electronics, 2nd ed.", by Paul Horowitz and Winfield Hill.
3) Read the first few chapters, surf the rest. Keep it by your
  desk for the rest of your natural existence.

The Art of Electronics, 2nd ed.
ISBN 0-521-37095-7
TK78155.H67 1989
621.381-dc19
Cambridge University Press
about $60.00

Winfield Hill has an email address; spam_OUThillTakeThisOuTspamrowland.org

This is the best single text on real electronics I've ever seen. It
covers those topics that experimenters, hobbyists and working engineers
really need, without the morass of mathematics so loved by ivory-tower
engineering professors. This was written by guys who actually needed to
get something done, not just spout off in front of a blackboard. Buy it.

Mark G. Forbes, R & D Engineer  |  Acres Gaming, Inc.    (541) 766-2515
KC7LZD                          |  815 NW 9th Street     (541) 753-7524 fax
.....forbesmKILLspamspam@spam@peak.org                |  Corvallis, OR 97330
http://www.peak.org/~forbesm
mforbesspamKILLspamhq.acresgaming.com

"There has been an alarming increase in the number of things I know nothing
about."
---Anomalous

1997\06\04@205026 by Bruce Cannon

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I agree that this book is an essential reference, but only because there
isn't anything better out there.  It is NOT good enough for beginners!!
Anyone who buys its "electronics demystified" sales pitch has forgotten
what it's like to not be familiar with this material.  Most of the people
who have reccommended it to me in the past have been engineers and
physicists, who are a long way from starting from scratch.  I used it
during learning, but I had access to engineers who could explain all the
holes this text leaves in fundamental concepts.  Also, it is pretty out of
date at this point.  (Has anyone asked them when they are going to write
the third edition?)

This book is quite difficult when used for learning from the ground up, and
should be used as a reference on top of an actual introductory text or two.
Having said that, I haven't seen a good, clear, concise introductory text.
Suggestions?

> 2) Buy "The Art of Electronics, 2nd ed.", by Paul Horowitz and Winfield
Hill.

> This is the best single text on real electronics I've ever seen. It
> covers those topics that experimenters, hobbyists and working engineers
> really need, without the morass of mathematics so loved by ivory-tower
> engineering professors. This was written by guys who actually needed to
> get something done, not just spout off in front of a blackboard. Buy it.

1997\06\05@031501 by Michel Van den Bergh

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I think The Art of Electronics is excellent for beginners also! At
least I used it. What you have to do is to read the same passages over
and over again until they suddenly become crystal clear!

Michel

1997\06\05@063016 by Tom Handley

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re: Beginning Electronics

  Bruce, If Heath is still in business selling their educational course-
ware and related hardware training labs, I would recommend them. I wish
CREI/McGraw-Hill was still around but that covered advanced subjects.
Another good source is Schaum's series of books.

  - Tom

At 03:41 PM 6/4/97 -0700, you wrote:
{Quote hidden}

1997\06\05@085407 by John Griessen

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At 03:27 AM 6/5/97 -0700, you wrote:
This book is quite difficult when used for learning from the ground up, and
>>should be used as a reference on top of an actual introductory text or two.
>> Having said that, I haven't seen a good, clear, concise introductory text.
>> Suggestions?
>>

This may sound odd, but one of the most clear, readable intros I have seen
is not really in print, at least maybe not in libraries.

The Bosch training systems for auto mechanics include manuals and videos on
things like electronic injection systems and brakes and they have a
fundamentals intro book that is great. It is complete, full of respect for
the reader even though assuming they are ignorant.  It does assume they
know some of how to observe with their senses, and think with their brain,
though.

Yes, I've been trained as an EE, but I can still remember when I was 8.
How do you find this book?  Not sure...I'll look in my attic, you call the
Robert Bosch Co. meanwhile.

JG

John Griessen  CIBOLO Metal Works
3406 Hancock Dr Austin TX 78731-5432  512 451-8207 FAX 451-0753
http://www.tpoint.net/~john_g/cibolo/

1997\06\05@143546 by Leon Heller

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In message <.....199706050049.RAA28786KILLspamspam.....enterprise.ccnet.com>, Bruce Cannon
<EraseMEbcannonspam_OUTspamTakeThisOuTCCNET.COM> writes
>I agree that this book is an essential reference, but only because there
>isn't anything better out there.  It is NOT good enough for beginners!!
>Anyone who buys its "electronics demystified" sales pitch has forgotten
>what it's like to not be familiar with this material.  Most of the people
>who have reccommended it to me in the past have been engineers and
>physicists, who are a long way from starting from scratch.  I used it
>during learning, but I had access to engineers who could explain all the
>holes this text leaves in fundamental concepts.  Also, it is pretty out of
>date at this point.  (Has anyone asked them when they are going to write
>the third edition?)
>

H and H are working on the 3rd edition - Winfield Hill posted something
about this to one of the sci.electronics.* newsgroups a few months ago.
He lurks on these groups, and often helps people out.

Leon
--
Leon Heller
Amateur radio callsign: G1HSM
Email: leonspamspam_OUTlfheller.demon.co.uk http://www.lfheller.demon.co.uk
Tel: +44 (0) 118 947 1424 (home) +44 (0) 1344 385556 (work)

1997\06\05@174252 by Martin McCormick

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       Amateur radio, also known as "ham radio," can be a great way to
learn about electronics if one decides to make full use of what is there.
The whole rationale for the existence of amateur radio is to allow people
to self-train in areas dealing with telecommunications and electronics so
as to be prepared for times of emergency.

       The "Radio Amateur's Handbook" published by the American Radio Relay
League has all kinds of theoretical and practical information as well as does
the magazine "QST," also published by the ARRL.

       There have been several projects recently published in "QST" using
various PIC's and there is quite a bit of experimentation in the digital
world being done by hams.

       It is up to the individual to get all that he or she can out of
this hobby, but if you try, you can learn how things really work.  The older
I get, the less I think I know, sometimes, but it is truly satisfying.

Martin McCormick WB5AGZ  Stillwater, OK 36.7N97.4W
OSU Center for Computing and Information Services Data Communications Group

1997\06\05@224250 by Gerhard Fiedler

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At 07:49 05/06/97 -0500, John Griessen wrote:
>This may sound odd, but one of the most clear, readable intros I have seen
>is not really in print, at least maybe not in libraries.
>
>The Bosch training systems for auto mechanics include manuals and videos on
>things like electronic injection systems and brakes and they have a
>fundamentals intro book that is great.

I can second that. I've seen some of their (German) material, and it is
really great, for fundamentals and for car related topics. Though maybe not
exactly the right focus for somebody interested in a fast start in
microcontrollers...


-------------------------------------
Gerhard Fiedler <@spam@gerhardKILLspamspampobox.com>
S‹o Paulo - Brazil

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