Searching \ for 'Piezio Buzzer for debugging?' in subject line. ()
Make payments with PayPal - it's fast, free and secure! Help us get a faster server
FAQ page: techref.massmind.org/techref/index.htm?key=piezio+buzzer+debugging
Search entire site for: 'Piezio Buzzer for debugging?'.

Truncated match.
PICList Thread
'Piezio Buzzer for debugging?'
1998\05\09@155205 by Jonathan

flavicon
face
       I'm trying to add a cheap way to debug my PIC (16F84)
design.  So I stuck a piezio buzzer on PORTA.  It works as a
good in-circuit debug, but it is rather high overhead (ie: set the port
pin, delay for 400ms, clear the port pin, delay for 400ms, repeat for
more buzzes).  The buzzer seems to have some odd characteristics
also (I don't know much about piezo buzzers-- startup time seems
a little long, etc).

       Is there a better way to do this?


Jonathan Cline
spam_OUTjclineTakeThisOuTspamvision.calpoly.edu

1998\05\09@183123 by ape

flavicon
face
Most people (includeing myself) go with LED's. but if you are not in a
position to see the LED (which you might be in) and need a audible
signal, hook the buzzer up to it's own oscillator and just have PORTA
turn on (or off) the osc.

Jonathan wrote:

{Quote hidden}

1998\05\09@195303 by Ken Pergola

flavicon
face
Mark Devin Newland wrote:

> ...hook the buzzer up to it's own oscillator and just have PORTA
> turn on (or off) the osc...
>

And even your local Radio Shack has just the ticket -- a piezo elelment and
oscillator in a plastic can unit -- just apply 5V and you're in business. A
quick 40 mS pulse should be audible.

Ken Pergola

1998\05\09@222405 by Sean Breheny

face picon face
At 07:55 PM 5/9/98 -0400, you wrote:
>Mark Devin Newland wrote:
>
>> ...hook the buzzer up to it's own oscillator and just have PORTA
>> turn on (or off) the osc...
>>
>
>And even your local Radio Shack has just the ticket -- a piezo elelment and
>oscillator in a plastic can unit -- just apply 5V and you're in business. A
>quick 40 mS pulse should be audible.
>
>Ken Pergola
>

I think that Jonathon IS already using a buzzer with an internal osc., and
he is just making it beep at 400ms intervals instead of just a continuous
tone. After all, a 1Hz signal would not excite a piezo element very well
and it also wouldn't be very audible :)

I have a question, however. Historically, why are piezo elements with
internal oscillators called "buzzers"? In my mind, the word buzzer conjures
up a very raspy, low freq. noise (abt. 100Hz or so), as would be produced
by an electromechanical buzzer. The way the word "buzz" is pronounced is
meant to imitate this sound. Since piezo elements have a bad low freq.
response, every piezo "buzzer" I have ever seen makes a sound of around
4000 Hz, not very much of a "buzz" in my sense of the word.

Sean


+--------------------------------+
| Sean Breheny                   |
| Amateur Radio Callsign: KA3YXM |
| Electrical Engineering Student |
+--------------------------------+
Save lives, please look at
http://www.all.org

Personal page: http://www.people.cornell.edu/pages/shb7
shb7spamKILLspamcornell.edu
Phone(USA): (607) 253-0315

1998\05\09@235301 by Ken Pergola

flavicon
face
Sean Breheny wrote:

> ...After all, a 1Hz signal would not excite a piezo element very well
> and it also wouldn't be very audible :) ...
>

Actually, switching a standard piezo disc (no built-in oscillator) on and off at
a 1 Hz rate is *very* audible. (However, the resulting clicks are well into the
human audible range).

Ken Pergola

1998\05\09@235937 by Sean Breheny

face picon face
At 11:55 PM 5/9/98 -0400, you wrote:
>Sean Breheny wrote:
>
>> ...After all, a 1Hz signal would not excite a piezo element very well
>> and it also wouldn't be very audible :) ...
>>
>
>Actually, switching a standard piezo disc (no built-in oscillator) on and
off at
>a 1 Hz rate is *very* audible. (However, the resulting clicks are well
into the
>human audible range).
>
>Ken Pergola
>

I stand corrected. I have never successfully used a plain piezo disc. I
didn't realize that it would have enough Q to resonate audibly with only
1Hz excitation.

Still, any ideas on why they are called "buzzers"?

Sean

+--------------------------------+
| Sean Breheny                   |
| Amateur Radio Callsign: KA3YXM |
| Electrical Engineering Student |
+--------------------------------+
Save lives, please look at
http://www.all.org

Personal page: http://www.people.cornell.edu/pages/shb7
.....shb7KILLspamspam.....cornell.edu
Phone(USA): (607) 253-0315

1998\05\10@001910 by Ken Pergola

flavicon
face
Sean Breheny wrote:

> Still, any ideas on why they are called "buzzers"?
>
> Sean
>

I agree with your feelings about the term "buzzer".

Might be just a case of an old term "sticking" around for newer technology
since they are sometimes referred to as 'piezo buzzers'..


Ken Pergola

1998\05\10@022722 by Gordon Couger

flavicon
face
part 0 903 bytes content-type:application/octet-stream;Gordon

Gordon Couger EraseMEgcougerspam_OUTspamTakeThisOuTrfdata.net
624 Cheyenne
Stillwater, OK 74075
405 624-2855   GMT -6:00
{Original Message removed}

1998\05\10@033310 by ape

flavicon
face
Sean Breheny wrote:

> At 07:55 PM 5/9/98 -0400, you wrote:
> >Mark Devin Newland wrote:
> >
> >> ...hook the buzzer up to it's own oscillator and just have PORTA
> >> turn on (or off) the osc...
> >>
> >
> >And even your local Radio Shack has just the ticket -- a piezo elelment and
> >oscillator in a plastic can unit -- just apply 5V and you're in business. A
> >quick 40 mS pulse should be audible.
> >
> >Ken Pergola
> >
>
> I think that Jonathon IS already using a buzzer with an internal osc., and
> he is just making it beep at 400ms intervals instead of just a continuous
> tone. After all, a 1Hz signal would not excite a piezo element very well
> and it also wouldn't be very audible :)

I'm at fault for not being more detailed on my meaning.  I usually have two
oscillators hooked up to my piezo's.  One at about 2kHz, and the other
at about 1Hz.  The 1Hz osc. is used to turn on and off the 2kHz osc. so as
to give a pulsed buzzer.  I then simply use the MCU to turn the 1Hz osc
off which in turn silences the piezo.

More... (looser matching)
- Last day of these posts
- In 1998 , 1999 only
- Today
- New search...