Searching \ for 'PICs and Pirates' in subject line. ()
Make payments with PayPal - it's fast, free and secure! Help us get a faster server
FAQ page: techref.massmind.org/techref/microchip/devices.htm?key=pic
Search entire site for: 'PICs and Pirates'.

Truncated match.
PICList Thread
'PICs and Pirates'
1998\12\08@150054 by Alex Kilpatrick

flavicon
face
[snip]
>
>Essentially, what happened was this: someone a few years ago managed to
>decipher the encryption used in the DSS smart cards.  The original cards
>were based on a proprietary CPU, and I don't know whether the person who
>cracked the system did anything to crack that CPU's innards.  In an eff-
>ort to capitalize on his discovery, he decided to write a PIC program to
>emulate the decryption algorithm and sell black-market decoders using it.
>
>Suddenly, while most 16C84 programs would have a value to a hacker of at
>most a few thousand dollars, there existed a particular 16C84 program that
>would allow anyone who could copy it the ability to make black-market sat-
>telite decoder cards (which could sell for many $hundreds each).  With all
>the efforts of would-be sattelite pirates focused on it, it should be no
>surprise that the 16C84's code protection was broken.
>

This is the second major case I have heard of where the PIC was used as a
(hardware) piracy device.  (The other being the Sony Playstation)  I think
this is particularly interesting because, in a way, the PIC is ideally
suited for piracy and cracking of hardware.   After all, hardware piracy is
just a special instance of interfacing.  I'm certainly not endorsing any of
this (I am a software developer), but I wonder if Microchip ever anticipated
their product being put to such nefarious uses.

I don't know much about the DSS issue, but I recently bought a playstation
and was shocked to see all "mod" chips (84's I believe) for sale on the net,
supposedly to allow people to play CD-R "backups"  Of course, there are
plenty of people selling "backups" of all the existing playstation games on
the net for $5 each.  I know piracy has ruined quite a few platforms in the
past because developers see all their profits melting away.  It looks like,
thanks to the PIC, this is likely to happen with the playstation.  This is
really a shame because many of the playstation games are very creative and
quite well done.

So basically, the driving force behind the 16C84's code protection being
broken is the effort of one type of thief trying to steal from another type
of thief.  <sigh>

Alex

1998\12\08@162738 by wwl

picon face
On Tue, 8 Dec 1998 14:45:26 -0500, you wrote:

>[snip]

>This is the second major case I have heard of where the PIC was used as a
>(hardware) piracy device.  (The other being the Sony Playstation)  I think
>this is particularly interesting because, in a way, the PIC is ideally
>suited for piracy and cracking of hardware.   After all, hardware piracy is
>just a special instance of interfacing.  I'm certainly not endorsing any of
>this (I am a software developer), but I wonder if Microchip ever anticipated
>their product being put to such nefarious uses.
I doubt it, but I also doubt they were too unhappy about the chip
sales...!
>I don't know much about the DSS issue, but I recently bought a playstation
>and was shocked to see all "mod" chips (84's I believe)
Usually 12C508's
> for sale on the net,
>supposedly to allow people to play CD-R "backups"  Of course, there are
>plenty of people selling "backups" of all the existing playstation games on
>the net for $5 each.  I know piracy has ruined quite a few platforms in the
>past because developers see all their profits melting away.  It looks like,
>thanks to the PIC, this is likely to happen with the playstation.
But it could equally have been done with any number of other MCUs.
Another major reason for the hack was to allow foreign discs to be
played.

More... (looser matching)
- Last day of these posts
- In 1998 , 1999 only
- Today
- New search...