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PICList Thread
'PC joystick = adc gameport info'
1997\01\15@043225 by John Sanderson

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Dear PIC.ers,
This is a little off-topic, but I think it will be of interest to a lot of
us, if only for reference.
..
A client of mine wants to chart the progress of a laboratory
stress/strain test, for materials QA purposes.
Initially, he thought an analogue X/Y plotter would be appropriate,
till he found what that would cost these days. Obsolete approach,  etc.
Sensibly, he now opts to use a redundant PC (XT or AT) and the 8-bit
analogue game port available on many cheap combo cards.
I agreed whole-heartedly with him, and have elected to wire up his
transducers, head amps., etc., and program the whole shooting match.
..
Problem:  I'm darned if I can find technical data on these ports, in
my shelf literature, or on the 'net.
There's no shortage of vendors for them, just a lack of those that will
give you  enough data on how to use them for anything other than
pluggin' them in to run games & the like.
I don't know what speed they run at, what signal input ranges they
work over, software register sets, or anything useful for that matter.
                  Indeed, I am the ignorant one today.
Has anyone got a handy site that can answer this type of query?
..
BTW, I do use PICs, for other things - just can't seem to find a way
to shoehorn them into this job.

John S.
email from John Sanderson   /   JS Controls, Boksburg, RSA
Manufacturer & purveyor of laboratory force testing apparatus
and related products and services.
Tel/fax: Johannesburg 893 4154    Cellphone 082 453 4815

1997\01\15@061142 by Wolfram Liebchen

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At 11:30 15.01.97 +0000, you wrote:
>Sensibly, he now opts to use a redundant PC (XT or AT) and the 8-bit
>analogue game port available on many cheap combo cards.

To my knowledge, the game-port of a PC is NOT an A/D-converter, but
only something like a variable frequency generator.
Thus, it can only sense variable resistors on both channels, and
you cannot measure a voltage.

So, might be easier to use a PIC16C71 with software RS-232.

regards,
Wolfram


+-----------------------------------------------------+
| Wolfram Liebchen                                    |
| Forschungsinstitut fŸr Optik, TŸbingen, Deutschland |
| spam_OUTliebchenTakeThisOuTspamffo.fgan.de                         |
+-----------------------------------------------------+

1997\01\15@081003 by Luc Martin

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>>Sensibly, he now opts to use a redundant PC (XT or AT) and the 8-bit
>>analogue game port available on many cheap combo cards.
>
>To my knowledge, the game-port of a PC is NOT an A/D-converter, but
>only something like a variable frequency generator.
>Thus, it can only sense variable resistors on both channels, and
>you cannot measure a voltage.
>
>So, might be easier to use a PIC16C71 with software RS-232.
>
>regards,
>Wolfram

Hi,
 Sure, game port is based on RC pulse length variation. R should be a few
KOhms, and could vary from an adaptor to another. Often, programs using it
check the range before all. It is controlled by the BIOS function 15H.

Regards.

_____________________________
+                             +
+ Luc Martin                  +
+ DOS is beautiful            +
+ .....lucKILLspamspam@spam@greco2.polytechnique.fr +
+_____________________________+

1997\01\15@203222 by Tony Matthews

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John Sanderson wrote:
>
> Dear PIC.ers,
> This is a little off-topic, but I think it will be of interest to a lot of
> us, if only for reference.
> ..
> A client of mine wants to chart the progress of a laboratory
> stress/strain test, for materials QA purposes.
> Initially, he thought an analogue X/Y plotter would be appropriate,
> till he found what that would cost these days. Obsolete approach,  etc.
> Sensibly, he now opts to use a redundant PC (XT or AT) and the 8-bit
> analogue game port available on many cheap combo cards.
>snip<
I remember writing games for PC's the joystick input was the time out
period for a multivibrator and there was a great deal of jitter but it
averaged out OK you will have to convert a varying voltage to a variable
resistance.
PS "scope cards" are less than $100.00 US and give better resolution
multiple inputs and the software will be cheap or bury a PIC inside an
obsolete printer and make your own chart recorder (time/date/ ...!...)
Tony M.

1997\01\16@115148 by Sami Khawam

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There is some info at <http://www.hut.fi/~then>
Just folow the links.

--
Sami Khawam
a9501901spamKILLspamunet.univie.ac.at
http://unet.univie.ac.at/~a9501901

1997\01\16@212237 by uttl

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If you really want to use the Joystick port over using a serial A/D or
PIC on the other ports, then this may be helpful.

       There has been a lot of articles I've seen using different circuits to
measure signals with a Joystick port. I did a project for a friend who
wanted something DIRT cheap to sell to people doing amateur radio
astronomy work. There are many ways to couple signals into the port, but
he wanted to be sure to have isolation of these signals from the PC.
This sort of leaned to using an optoisolator.

       One of the better opto's for something like this is an H11F1QT. This
is an opto with a FET output. The resistance of the output tracks the
current to the input LED in a linear fashion.  It is manufactured by QT
Optoelectronics. DigiKey carries it.  The circuit I used was an OPAMP
scaled to input 0-1 volt DC which in turn pumped somewhere around 1-10
ma into the OPTO which simulated a joystick swinging full range (from
memory mind you). The max specs were something like 0-60ma on the LED
equaled 100M ohms to somewhere around 1 ohm on the FET output.

       It all worked great for him. I just did the hardware. He did the
software. I believe he told me that the maximum scan he could do was
around 20 - 50 times a second with a joystick port.

I that suit's your need go for it.  Otherwise, the original advice about
using a PIC would give better accuracy.  Good Luck.

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