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PICList Thread
'OT: IC Sockets'
1998\01\17@175149 by Charles Laforge

picon face
Hi there

For my application I will be using standard (as opposed to ZIF) sockets
to hold the PICs.  Can anyone recommend some that are better than others
for numerous inserting/removing of chips.  I will be using an adapter
for development work which will be made using a ZIF socket but I cannot
afford a ZIF for every board nor do I have enough board space for one.
I'm not too sure if I'm being very clear.... let me try again.  I need
good quality IC sockets which will not damage my PICs after numerous
insertion and removal cycles?  Hows that... better?


While I have you guys here.... can anyone point me towards PCB
connectors which allow two boards to stack together.  I guess they are
sometimes called daughter board connectors or something like that.  Just
though someone mught have a favorite source.

Thanks!
Charles



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1998\01\17@184340 by hansen

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face
Charles Laforge wrote:
>
> Hi there
>
> For my application I will be using standard (as opposed to ZIF) sockets
> to hold the PICs.  Can anyone recommend some that are better than others
> for numerous inserting/removing of chips.  I will be using an adapter
> for development work which will be made using a ZIF socket but I cannot
> afford a ZIF for every board nor do I have enough board space for one.
> I'm not too sure if I'm being very clear.... let me try again.  I need
> good quality IC sockets which will not damage my PICs after numerous
> insertion and removal cycles?  Hows that... better?
>

Here's what I do.  I put the pic in a standard (cheap) socket.  Then
I plug the socket into the socket that is on the PC board.  I can
also plug the socket into the ZIF socket on my programmer.  This works
great.  It plugs and unplugs more easily than the chip.  And if the
wear and tear on the pins gets too great, you simply throw the
socket (not the chip) away.  If you use this approach you can use
any old cheap socket.  I bought mine from BG micro.  I think I got
something like a dozen of them for a buck.

John Hansen

1998\01\17@184550 by Sean Breheny

face picon face
At 07:43 AM 1/17/98 PST, you wrote:
{Quote hidden}

A friend of mine (who is also on this list) showed me a great way to
protect chips under these circumstances: use Augat brand hi-reliability
sockets (the ones with the round contacts) and solder one into the board
but don't directly place the chip into it. Instead, place an additional
hi-rel socket onto the chip and leave it there. This way, when you insert
and remove the chip, you will be inserting/removing a socket from a socket,
and not directly touching the chip pins. Of course, this may not be
suitable for very sensitive or very high freq. circuits because of the
added capacitance, but it is not likely that you would be using sockets at
all in these cases.

Sean


+--------------------------------+
| Sean Breheny                   |
| Amateur Radio Callsign: KA3YXM |
| Electrical Engineering Student |
+--------------------------------+
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1998\01\17@185420 by Don McKenzie

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face
> At 07:43 AM 1/17/98 PST, you wrote:
> >Hi there
> >
> >For my application I will be using standard (as opposed to ZIF)
> sockets
> >to hold the PICs.  Can anyone recommend some that are better than
> others
> >for numerous inserting/removing of chips.  I will be using an adapter
> >for development work which will be made using a ZIF socket but I
> cannot
> >afford a ZIF for every board nor do I have enough board space for
> one.
> >I'm not too sure if I'm being very clear.... let me try again.  I
> need
> >good quality IC sockets which will not damage my PICs after numerous
> >insertion and removal cycles?  Hows that... better?

Have a look at:
http://www.dontronics.com/hints.html#sockets
Covers sockets, ZIF's, Emulator pods, and a lot more.

Don McKenzie  .....donKILLspamspam@spam@dontronics.com   http://www.dontronics.com

Don's Download Dungeon http://www.dontronics.com/download.html
DonTronics Logo Design Contest http://www.dontronics.com/logo.html
For more details, send a blank message to infospamKILLspamdontronics.com
or .....simstickKILLspamspam.....dontronics.com or EraseMEbasicsspam_OUTspamTakeThisOuTdontronics.com

1998\01\17@190450 by anick

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I have several project boards, and only one ZIF socket. Since a regualr
socket it is rather rough for my emulator probe I use a machined pin
socked on the project board, the connect the ZIF to that, then I can
use the ZIF for the Emulator, and then later for the prototype EPROM's.
The ZIF I use is the kind with a screw-like closing scheme. It's the
Econo type from 3M (I think). I got it from Digi-Key. I didnt get the
socket adapter for it (I didnt know I would be needed) So I just
carfully forced the ZIF socked into a machine-pin socket. it's a very
tight fit and the machine-pin socket pins are much more durable that the
other kind.

I hope this helps.

Alan Nickerson

Charles Laforge wrote:
{Quote hidden}

1998\01\18@084845 by Leon Heller

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picon face
In message <19980117154325.4163.qmailspamspam_OUThotmail.com>, Charles Laforge
<@spam@cjoachimKILLspamspamHOTMAIL.COM> writes
>Hi there
>
>For my application I will be using standard (as opposed to ZIF) sockets
>to hold the PICs.  Can anyone recommend some that are better than others
>for numerous inserting/removing of chips.  I will be using an adapter
>for development work which will be made using a ZIF socket but I cannot
>afford a ZIF for every board nor do I have enough board space for one.
>I'm not too sure if I'm being very clear.... let me try again.  I need
>good quality IC sockets which will not damage my PICs after numerous
>insertion and removal cycles?  Hows that... better?
>

Any turned-pin socket should be OK. I often use "sacrificial" cheap
sockets to hold the PIC.

>
>While I have you guys here.... can anyone point me towards PCB
>connectors which allow two boards to stack together.  I guess they are
>sometimes called daughter board connectors or something like that.  Just
>though someone mught have a favorite source.

Samtec specialises in this type of thing.

Leon
--
Leon Heller: KILLspamleonKILLspamspamlfheller.demon.co.uk http://www.lfheller.demon.co.uk
Amateur Radio Callsign G1HSM    Tel: +44 (0) 118 947 1424
See http://www.lfheller.demon.co.uk/dds.htm for details of my AD9850
DDS system - schematic and software.

1998\01\18@124031 by Herbert Graf

picon face
> -----Original Message-----
> From: pic microcontroller discussion list
> [RemoveMEPICLISTTakeThisOuTspamMITVMA.MIT.EDU]On Behalf Of Charles Laforge
> Sent: January 17, 1998 10:43
> To: spamBeGonePICLISTspamBeGonespamMITVMA.MIT.EDU
> Subject: OT: IC Sockets
>
>
> Hi there
>
> For my application I will be using standard (as opposed to ZIF) sockets
> to hold the PICs.  Can anyone recommend some that are better than others
> for numerous inserting/removing of chips.  I will be using an adapter
> for development work which will be made using a ZIF socket but I cannot
> afford a ZIF for every board nor do I have enough board space for one.
> I'm not too sure if I'm being very clear.... let me try again.  I need
> good quality IC sockets which will not damage my PICs after numerous
> insertion and removal cycles?  Hows that... better?

       Well I too have found ZIFs to way to expensive, something on the order o
f
$20 canadian dollars, which I personnally think is insane for my purposes. I
did some looking into it
and I find that the non machined sockets are best for those purposes. The
machined ones tended to hold on to the pins a little to tightly for me. The
others, I don't know what to call them,
have a sort of spring action, that if you are carefull when taking out, lets
go quite nicely.

> While I have you guys here.... can anyone point me towards PCB
> connectors which allow two boards to stack together.  I guess they are
> sometimes called daughter board connectors or something like that.  Just
> though someone mught have a favorite source.

       Well, I don't know what to call them either, hold on, (flipping through
Digikey catalog...) ahh, look for IDC connectors. I think that is what you
are looking for. TTYL

1998\01\18@125729 by peter

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face
John Hansen wrote:

> Here's what I do.  I put the pic in a standard (cheap) socket.  Then
> I plug the socket into the socket that is on the PC board.

snip

> John Hansen

I tried this a couple of times but quickly gave up as the
osc didn't start reliably.
I was using c84's + three pin ceramic res.
4mHz osc in XT mode, I think I also tried HS mode

Anyone used this particular setup without problems
should I try another make of resonators ?



--
If God so loved the World (and created it)
then why is it so imperfect
It's got more bugs than windoze 95

TakeThisOuTpeterEraseMEspamspam_OUTcousens.her.forthnet.gr

1998\01\18@173939 by William Chops Westfield

face picon face
       I need good quality IC sockets which will not damage my PICs after
       numerous insertion and removal cycles?  Hows that... better?

   Any turned-pin socket should be OK. I often use "sacrificial" cheap
   sockets to hold the PIC.

Ack!  Get a (usually cheap) side-wipe socket for multiple insertions.  The
expensive machined pin scokets (round holes, round pins) are nasty to insert
into - they might not damage your pic, but YOU will trying to get them in.

Better yet, try this old hack: Use two sockets.  Put one on your board, put
the PIC in the other socket.  Now, instertion/removal wear and tear is on
the (cheap, replacable) socket the PIC is piggybacked on, rather than the
PIC itself.

BillW

1998\01\19@120359 by Andrew Mayo

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When prototyping, I have found that owning several of the following
gadgets is invaluable..

(instructions for the 18 pin devices, naturally)

Take one 18 pin DIP header - they can be hard to find, so you can make
one by cutting and gluing together two 14 pin headers - 4 pins come from
the second header. Use a small piece of metal to strengthen the join.

Now take a short piece of 18 way ribbon cable, about 2 inches max, and
solder this to the header. Then take a small piece of prototyping board
(veroboard) and mount an 18 pin zero insertion force socket on this
board. Solder a 0.1uF monolithic bypass capacitor across PIC power and
ground underneath the board. Then solder the ribbon cable onto the
board.

Now this gadget plugs into the socket in the target application, which
can be a cheap sidewipe IC socket. The PIC plugs into the ZIF socket, of
course. These gadgets are wonderful because you can quickly pull the PIC
out and reprogram it but you are never grappling with IC sockets.

You could do this a bit more neatly by using an IDC DIP header plus an
IDC 0.1" board connector of the type used in hard drives and almost
everywhere. You have a male header on the prototyping board and so the
ribbon cable is crimped in one operation and then plugged into the
target plus the ZIF board. Your choice.

{Quote hidden}

1998\01\19@120419 by Pasi T Mustalahti

picon face
On Sat, 17 Jan 1998, Charles Laforge wrote:

> Hi there
>
> For my application I will be using standard (as opposed to ZIF) sockets
> to hold the PICs.  Can anyone recommend some that are better than others
> for numerous inserting/removing of chips.
PTM: I insert PIC in a good quality socket when I'm developing something
and move his packet, PIC + Socket between prommer and the proto. Workin
like this I'll save the pins of PIC.
The best method might be 'in site programming' but sometimes you just
don't have space enough or the project seems so simple, that you think,
you'll make it with only two or three recursions.
One nice possibility is to have a daughterboard with PIC, some R, C and D
and connectors to your prommer and the socket in the proto. You could
use this daughterboard many times. (I do not have such, I have been lazy).
--------------------------------------------------------------------------
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Mail: Turun Yliopisto / Fysla, Vesilinnantie 5, 20014
Pt 02-3336669, FAX 02-3335632 (Pk 02-2387010, NMT 049-555577)
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1998\01\19@213435 by Mike Keitz

picon face
On Sun, 18 Jan 1998 14:37:47 PST William Chops Westfield
<RemoveMEbillwspam_OUTspamKILLspamCISCO.COM> writes:

>Ack!  Get a (usually cheap) side-wipe socket for multiple insertions.

I agree with that.  When buying regular plastic sockets, make sure to get
the type which has a contact leaf on both sides of the pin.  The ones
that just have contacts on the inside of the pin will fall apart readily.
For almost all purposes, the double-leaf ones are just as good as the
expensive machined pin ones.  The machined pin sockets tend to lose their
grip on the pins after a few dozen insert/removes anyway.  I have a
couple projects with double-leaf sockets which the PIC has been changed
100 or more times and still doing just fine.

If you're using perfboard, glue the socket's body to the board using
hot-melt glue.  This will save a lot of stress on the pins and wiring
when the IC is removed.

If the pins on your PIC do break, it's not the end of the world (or even
the end of the PIC chip).  Solder a #26 solid copper wire to the
remaining part of the pin on the chip, trim it to the same length as the
other pins, and bend it into alignment.

1998\01\20@061652 by Russell McMahon

picon face
1.    So called "Machine Screw"  sockets (which have a round
access hole for the IC pin and a multi blade somewhat
circular contact) are usually the most reliable moderately
priced solution, as noted by others. They are not magic and
not ZIF and will fail if you use them often enough. As also
noted, putting a "junk" socket (or a second machine screw
socket) on the PIC and plugging it into the socket on the
PCB is a very time honoured trick. However ...

2.    Sockets which make no great official claim to multiuse
but which I have found extremely good in practical use are
the AMP "Diplomate" series. These are very low cost and
appear to be similar to any number of other brands of
sockets. However, while some other brands have proven
woefully inadequate "in the field" for even a single
insertion application, I consider the diplomates perform far
beyond their price bracket.

Disclaimer:

   - Caveat Emptor
   - I have no association with AMP whatsoever (apart from
being a satisfied customer)

{Original Message removed}

1998\01\20@124918 by Mauro, Chuck

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I concur heartily with Leon.  While machine screw sockets are great for
single or low count insertion/removal use, but I also highly recommend
the AMP Diplomate series.  I've designed countless boards with various
socketed IC's, and have used many (10's of K's worth) of the Diplomates.
They definitely work...

I, too, have no affiliation w/ AMP, but I know what I like.  There are
other great brands out there - but I only reccomend dual side wiping
models if you are searching the very low cost market.

- Chuck Mauro


> {Original Message removed}

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