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PICList Thread
'Morse keyer code'
1998\02\10@145723 by nestoji

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I am relatively new to "PICing", but have a protoboard, a programmer,
and some 16F84s with which to learn.
I also have the PicBASIC compiler from MEL. So far, my efforts have been
flashing LEDs, raeding switches, sending RS-232 to a PC,
and reading an ADC0831.


I've seen a few postings about "simple" morse code keyers, and would be
interested in using that as a project to learn more about the PICs.
Then I could include that functionality in a project which is a
simple/low cost digital display for homemade radios I build.

Most of the keyers seem to use the low-end PICs, such as the 12C and
16C5x. I assume that is for cost and size considerations. Am I correct
in the belief that the same code should run on the 16F84. I'd like to
stay with that chip because of the EEPROM which makes debugging easier.

Is there any "freeware" code for a CW keyer? I've always found the best
way to learn a new programming language is to look at somebody else's
code and see how it works.

Does it make any sense to try to write a keyer program in PicBASIC? I
know this may offend the assembler purists, but I had to ask.
How about using a hybrid of PicBASIC and inline assembler for the
time-critical routines, interupt handlers, etc.?

I haven't had this much fun since my 8008, 8080, Z80, 6502 days. Any
sugestions would be appreciated.

Jim

1998\02\10@172757 by Mike Keitz

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On Tue, 10 Feb 1998 14:55:07 -0500 jim nestor <spam_OUTnestojiTakeThisOuTspamhome.com> writes:
>Then I could include that functionality in a project which is a
>simple/low cost digital display for homemade radios I build.

PICs make good frequency counters.  Without external components (other
than amplifying the signal up to TTL levels), any PIC can count a 50 MHz
signal to a single cycle.  This is usually just right for homemade HF
radios.  Once the frequency is counted, advanced features can be added
like adding/subtracting IF from the displayed frequency, or "locking" the
frequency to compensate for slow drift.

The CW keyer functions could possibly even be in the same PIC.  Likely
you'd need to go to a PIC with more than 1 hardware timer to do both
simultaneously.


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1998\02\10@182609 by peter

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face
Mike Keitz wrote:
>
> PICs make good frequency counters.  Without external components (other
> than amplifying the signal up to TTL levels), any PIC can count a 50 MHz
> signal to a single cycle.  This is usually just right for homemade HF
> radios.  Once the frequency is counted, advanced features can be added
> like adding/subtracting IF from the displayed frequency, or "locking" the
> frequency to compensate for slow drift.

How ? a prescaler is out of the question if your
counting "to a single cycle"
You must mean 5MHz

Peter Cousens
email: .....peterKILLspamspam@spam@cousens.her.forthnet.gr  phone: + 3081 324450, 380534
snailmail:  Folia, Agia Fotini, Karteros, Heraklion  Crete, Greece.

1998\02\10@234345 by Robert Bednarz

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Peter
   Check out the 50MHZ frequency meter at http://www.picpoint.com
under the projects section. I cobbled one together last nite on a SIMM
Stick.  There are a couple of typos in EFMETER.asm  (WDTE instead of WDT
in the declarations and a ": " instead of a "; " in one of the comments.
I can't read the Italian but the source is commented in English. I only
needed it to work to 30MHZ and it does that nicely. 3 digits and an
exponent with very low parts count .
                                                               Bob
Peter Cousens wrote:

{Quote hidden}

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