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'IR Remote formats'
1997\02\23@212946 by Robert Zeff

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Hi,
I'm trying to "learn" the codes of various IR remotes.  I've
found that the pulse widths from the remotes vary by as much as
30% depending on distance.  I'd appreciate at suggestions,
specifications, etc.  that anyone can give me regarding
the remote formats.

Thanks,


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1997\02\24@000951 by Steve Hardy

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The pulse width at the detector varies because of the interaction
between the bandpass filter and the AGC.  The rise and fall delays
are not equal.  This shouldn't be a problem in practice, if you
do the learning function with a strong signal.  The stronger signal
will tend to equalise the rise and fall delays.

There is no standard format; each manufacturer seems to use a different
protocol.  I have found that just timing each transition of the
sequence (with reference to the first pulse, and a time resolution of
about 50-100 microseconds) gives adequate results.  Note that some mfrs
use alternate codes for the same button, presumably to allow
distinction between 'auto repeat' and multiple presses of the same
button.

All remotes that I have tested start with a relatively long pulse.
This is probably done to allow the AGC of the receiver to stabilise,
and possibly to grab the attention of the processor.

Regards,
SJH
Canberra, Australia

> From: Robert Zeff <.....rzeffKILLspamspam@spam@AINET.COM>
>
> Hi,
> I'm trying to "learn" the codes of various IR remotes.  I've
> found that the pulse widths from the remotes vary by as much as
> 30% depending on distance.  I'd appreciate at suggestions,
> specifications, etc.  that anyone can give me regarding
> the remote formats.

1997\02\24@080621 by Cheng Huat Tan

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At 18:29 23/02/97 -0800, you wrote:
{Quote hidden}

Try to take a look at the site of http://www.irda.org , this is a 'new' standard
for IR communications.

Cheng Huat TAN
Department of Electronics and Computer Science
University of Southampton
Southampton UK SO 17 1BJ
Email: .....cht195KILLspamspam.....ecs.soton.ac.uk
Homepage: http://whirligig.ecs.soton.ac.uk/~cht195/
Tel: +44 0956 350725

1997\02\24@092105 by Andy Kunz

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At 06:29 PM 2/23/97 -0800, you wrote:
>Hi,
>I'm trying to "learn" the codes of various IR remotes.  I've
>found that the pulse widths from the remotes vary by as much as
>30% depending on distance.  I'd appreciate at suggestions,
>specifications, etc.  that anyone can give me regarding
>the remote formats.

Robert,

30% variation is a bit much, my experience shows _much_ less.  Are you
beyond the 10m range?  This is 30% on the same IR handheld?  Maybe the
batteries need to be replaced.

I use a Sony (I think) IR detector, demodulates the 38KHz so all I see is
the actual data coming over.  Width is pretty close to spec all the time
with it.  Perhaps your IR sensor is not working well.

Andy

==================================================================
Andy Kunz - Montana Design - 409 S 6th St - Phillipsburg, NJ 08865
         Hardware & Software for Industry & R/C Hobbies
       "Go fast, turn right, and keep the wet side down!"
==================================================================

1997\02\24@092127 by Andy Kunz

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At 04:10 PM 2/24/97 EST, you wrote:
>There is no standard format; each manufacturer seems to use a different
>protocol.  I have found that just timing each transition of the

Most manufacturers use one of three standards:

Telefunken, where everything is always different.

NEC, where the Mfg ID field is usually different across brands, the key data
can be any mfg-specified code, and the Mfg ID and Key Data fields are
verified by XOR with the next data byte.  That is, Mfg ID and Mfg ID- is
transmitted, Key Data and Key Data- is transmitted.

Zilog, which I haven't looked at personally but is making great inroads,
used by Zenith I believe.

Andy
==================================================================
Andy Kunz - Montana Design - 409 S 6th St - Phillipsburg, NJ 08865
         Hardware & Software for Industry & R/C Hobbies
       "Go fast, turn right, and keep the wet side down!"
==================================================================

1997\02\24@094340 by Brian Aase

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>I'm trying to "learn" the codes of various IR remotes.  I've
>found that the pulse widths from the remotes vary by as much as
>30% depending on distance.  I'd appreciate at suggestions,
>specifications, etc.  that anyone can give me regarding
>the remote formats.

Are you using an integrated IR receiver module?  I was _very_
surprised to find that Sharp, Temic, and possibly others have
a published output pulse width tolerance of plus/minus 33%

Perhaps one could achieve a tighter tolerance by building a brute-
force photodetector using just a low-sensitivity IR diode.  I
think that's what a lot of learning remotes use.

You could also try to build your own sensitive detector with
a Philips TDA3047.  I tried one a couple years ago, and got
pretty good results.

1997\02\24@094806 by Brian Aase

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> >There is no standard format; each manufacturer seems to use a different
> >protocol.  I have found that just timing each transition of the
>
> Most manufacturers use one of three standards:
[snip]

Don't forget the Philips RC5 code.  It's becoming more popular among
hi-fi equipment, and (AFAIK) it's the only one with an extensive set
of pre-defined commands for brand-to-brand uniformity.

1997\02\24@110047 by Carl Bieling

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> At 18:29 23/02/97 -0800, you wrote:
> >Hi,
> >I'm trying to "learn" the codes of various IR remotes.  I've

Some IR links to check:

< http://falcon.arts.cornell.edu/~dnegro/IR/IR.html >
< http://www.armory.com/~spcecdt/remote/ >
< http://www.hut.fi/~then/electronics/opto.html >
< http://www.sharp.co.jp/ecg/unit/unit.html >

Carl Bieling

1997\02\25@091505 by Cheng Huat Tan

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At 09:24 24/02/97 -0500, you wrote:
{Quote hidden}

There is a new standard called IrDA. I worry if you have any idea of it

regards

Cheng Huat TAN
Department of Electronics and Computer Science
University of Southampton
Southampton UK SO 17 1BJ
Email: EraseMEcht195spam_OUTspamTakeThisOuTecs.soton.ac.uk
Homepage: http://whirligig.ecs.soton.ac.uk/~cht195/
Tel: +44 0956 350725

1997\02\25@100312 by Andy Kunz

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At 02:04 PM 2/25/97 +0000, you wrote:
>There is a new standard called IrDA. I worry if you have any idea of it

IrDA is not used in IR remote controls for television sets, which is where
this thread started.

Boy, what a remote that would be!

Andy
==================================================================
Andy Kunz - Montana Design - 409 S 6th St - Phillipsburg, NJ 08865
         Hardware & Software for Industry & R/C Hobbies
       "Go fast, turn right, and keep the wet side down!"
==================================================================

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