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PICList Thread
'Diode array receptor to determine critical angle'
1999\03\02@111144 by Jon Petty

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Hi

I want to use a laser or led as a light source and some kind of a diode array
receptor to measure the critical angle of refraction for a automotive fluid.
The measurement device will be a small handheld unit and I need to keep
pricing low ($250 retail). The device should be able to test different types
of fluid with different angles of refraction and the software will be used to
allow that use.

Any ideas ?
Does anyone know of an inexpensive diode array receptor or way to measure
where light is received?

Is there any kind of a light potentiometer that reads the position of a beam
of light and output the result?

Maybe another less expensive method?


Thanks

Jon

1999\03\02@111819 by Jochen Feldhaar

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Hello Jon,

maybe using one of the photocoupling lines (the photoreceptor) out of a
scanner or fax would help. These give good resolution for a onedimensional
application. So no moving parts need be present. Price will be OK due to
the big numbers of series production.

Greetings

Jochen DH6FAZ
spam_OUTjjfTakeThisOuTspamdetektor.de

1999\03\02@114622 by marcel

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siemens makes multi segment photodiodes
marcel
amsterdam

Jon Petty wrote:

{Quote hidden}

1999\03\02@122309 by mlsirton

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Hi,

On  2 Mar 99 at 11:09, Jon Petty wrote:
> I want to use a laser or led as a light source and some kind of a diode array
> receptor to measure the critical angle of refraction for a automotive fluid.
> The measurement device will be a small handheld unit and I need to keep
> pricing low ($250 retail). The device should be able to test different types
> of fluid with different angles of refraction and the software will be used to
> allow that use.
>
> Does anyone know of an inexpensive diode array receptor or way to measure
> where light is received?

A linear CCD is one option. It's basically a one line CCD.  You would
need some optics and hardware around it.

> Is there any kind of a light potentiometer that reads the position of a beam
> of light and output the result?

There is.  There are single or dual axis detectors that output a
voltage relative to the light spot location on it.  I've used them
with lasers before.  The detection area is about 15mm (square, I used
the XY detector).  Not sure about the price.  If it sounds like what
you need I can find more data (this was about 10 years ago...)

> Maybe another less expensive method?

Maybe you should mount your light source on a motor and scan till you
hit 1 fixed photodiode.  This would probably be cheapest if it's
acceptable...

Hope this helps,
Guy - .....mlsirtonKILLspamspam@spam@inter.net.il

1999\03\02@130506 by paulb

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Jon Petty wrote:

> I want to use a laser or led as a light source and some kind of a
> diode array receptor to measure the critical angle of refraction for a
> automotive fluid.

> Does anyone know of an inexpensive diode array receptor or way to
> measure where light is received?

 No specifics, but I have read a few answers thus far and the
mechanical approach has been noted where a stepper motor directs a LED
or even laser beam to one receiver.

 It seems to me that receptor electronics is much more complex than
emitter electronics, so unless you use a linear CCD device out of a
barcode scanner, which has integrated electronics, it would be easier to
implement multiplexing of an array of LED sources (LED bar array) than
individual receptors.

 I daresay you'll be looking at barcode sensors then.
--
 Cheers,
       Paul B.

1999\03\02@131718 by Wagner Lipnharski

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Try Texas TSL1401 array sensors. It's 128x1 dots in a DIP14 chip.
We use it and others for fine adjust positioning in some X-Y tables.
It is pretty easy to use, and cost around $5.00 for quantities.
You will need a narrow bean of light or at least a high contrast.

But, optical viscosity devices are available for less than $120,
try Newport, Omega or other.  They are based on the fact that
different viscosities or solid accumulation in water refracts
light in different angles, so it shows the angle in a scale.
For solids, like sugar or salt, its called "Brix Meter" and it
indicates the percentage of solids in pure water. There are
high sophisticated electronic devices for laboratory use and
those guys with high accuracy goes for more than $2000, but
they have temperature compensation and more.

--------------------------------------------------------
Wagner Lipnharski - UST Research Inc. - Orlando, Florida
Forum and microcontroller web site:   http:/http://www.ustr.net
Microcontrollers Survey:  http://www.ustr.net/tellme.htm

1999\03\02@155801 by Peter Grey

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At 11:09 AM 2/03/99 EST, you wrote:

Check out the STREETA device for RI at Texas Instruments. I do not know the
price but may be suitable.


Peter

{Quote hidden}

1999\03\02@180136 by Smith, Pat

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Actually its SPREETA http://www.ti.com/spreeta/



-----Original Message-----
From: Peter Grey [martechspamKILLspamOZEMAIL.COM.AU]
Sent: Tuesday, March 02, 1999 2:55 PM
To: .....PICLISTKILLspamspam.....MITVMA.MIT.EDU
Subject: Re: Diode array receptor to determine critical angle


At 11:09 AM 2/03/99 EST, you wrote:

Check out the STREETA device for RI at Texas Instruments. I do not know the
price but may be suitable.


Peter

>Hi
>
>I want to use a laser or led as a light source and some kind of a diode
array
>receptor to measure the critical angle of refraction for a automotive
fluid.
>The measurement device will be a small handheld unit and I need to keep
>pricing low ($250 retail). The device should be able to test different
types
>of fluid with different angles of refraction and the software will be used
to
>allow that use.
>
>Any ideas ?
>Does anyone know of an inexpensive diode array receptor or way to measure
>where light is received?
>
>Is there any kind of a light potentiometer that reads the position of a
beam
{Quote hidden}

1999\03\02@185614 by Jon Petty

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In a message dated 3/2/99 4:04:16 PM US Mountain Standard Time,
EraseMEpatsmithspam_OUTspamTakeThisOuTTI.COM writes:

<< Actually its SPREETA http://www.ti.com/spreeta/
 >>
Thanks for the direction

Jon

1999\03\02@232254 by Mike Keitz

picon face
On Tue, 2 Mar 1999 11:09:53 EST Jon Petty <Phxsys3spamspam_OUTAOL.COM> writes:
>Hi
>
>I want to use a laser or led as a light source and some kind of a
>diode array
>receptor to measure the critical angle of refraction for a automotive
>fluid.
>The measurement device will be a small handheld unit and I need to
>keep
>pricing low ($250 retail).

>Is there any kind of a light potentiometer that reads the position of
>a beam
>of light and output the result?

It's called a Position Sensing Diode (PSD) photodiode.  I think it makes
2 analog outputs, the ratio of the two depending on the position of the
light spot on the diode.  It's not what you want.

>Maybe another less expensive method?

For this project it seems like simpler is better.  If the light is bright
and visible you could just have the user observe the position of the
refracted beam on a translucent screen.  The next step up in complexity
would have a moving part controlled by the user that adjusts the source
or detector until the angle is correct for light to be detected.  The
corresponding position (angle, index, etc) could be read out on a dial,
so no electronics, other than a way to show the user how much light is
detected, would be needed.  It seems like these methods would be very
simple to use, full automation seems unnecessary.


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1999\03\03@094324 by jberlien

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FYI, many of Texas Instruments optical devices, including the linear sensor
arrays, are now being produced by Texas Advanced Opto Solutions,
http://www.taosinc.com/

I have done several applications using PICs with the linear arrays, and
they are a good match.  I'd be glad to offer any assistance I can.  Also, if
you
are interested in using linear arrays with the PIC, keep an eye out for the
upcoming linear array with serial A/D on-board.

Best regards,

Jack Berlien
@spam@jberlienKILLspamspamtaosinc.com


{Original Message removed}

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