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PICList Thread
'IR Remotes and B&E (Breaking and Entering)'
1997\01\07@210936 by Doug Claar

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>a system immune to both.  The one difficulty is that federal government reg-
>ulations make it hard to use any secure code over 40 bits long, and codes
>of that length may be subject to "birthday" attacks.  I could nonetheless
>tell anyone interested how to make a system that was secure, though such
>advice could well steer someone into a patent violation since many such sys-
>tems are already patented.

Well, "our" own dear Microchip has a line of keyloc chips intended to
solve this very problem. I haven't used them, but couldn't help but
notice them while perusing their web site. So perhaps the answer is
very close at hand!

The keyloc systems rotate codes, but don't frequency hop.  The latest
scheme is to always change the code AND the frequency, so that a record
and playback attack is impossible.  If someone is going to go to the
trouble of cracking the encryption AND frequency just to get my car,
then I am not going to be able to stop them.  But if they want it that
bad, they can just do what some thieves did to an expensive, fuel-cutoff
alarm supplied car, and just shove it into a panel truck and drive off.

In one of the James Bond movies, a would be car thief is killed when
007's car responds not with an alarm, but a large self-destruction
explosion. Hey, did the bad guys think of a "denial of service" attack? :-)

==Doug Claar

1997\01\08@032601 by Mike

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>In one of the James Bond movies, a would be car thief is killed when
>007's car responds not with an alarm, but a large self-destruction
>explosion. Hey, did the bad guys think of a "denial of service" attack? :-)

Why not use an efficient roll code for the remote (no complex frequency
hoping) to allow getting in - then require the car owner to have a
secondary alarm inhibit AS WELL - like pressing a certain accessory
button a preset number of times etc - Or another press of the remote
(The alarm knows the door is open and that some other function is requested
so that the car is allowed to start only after this sequence of 2 or 3
events has occured).

If a thief wants to get access (by circumventing the IR using a recorder)
then let him in and give him a nice sizable shock to the bum from an EHT
coil under the seat - then lock the doors and turn on all the horns etc.
Liability can be covered by playing a concise warning message (from EPROM)
and printed on the dash etc.

Then you'd have the option of suing the thief for 'extraneous psychological'
issues once he's caught - not to mention any previous 'proceeds of crime'
etc since most professional thieves have built up quite a nice nest egg...


Rgds


Mike


'Brookes and Gatehouse B&G 390'
2000\02\16@132956 by Andy Verhoeven
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Bookes and Gatehouse builds navigation equipment, they no longer support
their Hecules line.  Does anyone know the protocol that the multi function
displays use to get their information.  One can select one of about 30
channels of information on any number of muti function displays or  20/20
repeaters in parrallel.  I only wish to build a few 4 digit 7 segement
displays for myself.

I figure this is a long shot, thanks

Andrew

'Brookes and Gatehouse B&G 390 [OT]'
2000\02\17@063500 by gsawyer

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I would think thye most likely use a sub-set of
the NMEA protocol, this has multiple channels for
a number of functions ( Nav, Autopilot etc etc)
in addition to what "we" normally tend to think of
( i.e GPS data ).

 The full specs ARE available off the 'web


Regards,

         Glenville.


'[EE]:: Quad Leak Naim Revox B&O'
2010\12\20@225940 by RussellMc
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Purveyors, repairers and upgraders of old iron

                http://www.quadmodsusa.com/

If you don't recognise the names this page is probably not for you.
If you do then it may be a Black Hole.



               Russell

_________________

Quad Mods USA has become the definitive source for all of your Quad
electronics repairs, upgrades, replacement parts and answers about
your Quad components. Quad Mods USA specializes in vintage hifi
revision for Quad, Naim, Leak, Revox.
You can be assured of the highest quality of workmanship from Quad
Mods USA and the painstaking precautions we take to make sure your
mint vintage components remain an undamaged or restored collectors
piece. We go to great lengths to be true to the original circuit
design and upgrade the components on the boards to newer parts with
better specifications for sound improvement. We are a group of
engineers and hi-fi enthusiasts that will treat your equipment as if
it were our own prized posession. Our turn-around times are very quick
and we offer a gurarantee on all of our revisions. We treat our
customers the way we would like to be treated and give that "old
fashioned" personalized service. We can absolutely make your Quad
component sound better and it will be accomplished with the correct
method. Give us a try and you will be convinced. By far we see more
Quad 405 amplifiers than any other product. The Quad 405 was
manufactured up until the 80's. the Quad 405 was revolutionary in it's
design with being the first current dumping amplifier. The Quad 405
had basically two different versions the last in production
incorporating a speaker protection circuit. The Quad 405 though
legendary cam be improved upon by utilizing better opamps and output
transistors. Quad Mods USA stays true to the original design of the
Quad 405 because it is sound rather we upgrade the Quad 405 components
to a higher grade. There are many different levels to upgrade the Quad
405 and as you go up the ladder with price there is a diminishing
return but none the less an improvement of the Quad 405 at every
level

2010\12\21@003530 by Bob Blick

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> incorporating a speaker protection circuit. The Quad 405 though
> legendary cam be improved upon by utilizing better opamps and output
> transistors.
Transistors? Bah, that's new Quad. I have a friend whose Quads use
KT66's. That's real Quad :)

He has the full rig, with preamp, two power amps, and the two
"sofa-back" style speakers.

Cheers,

Bob

-- http://www.fastmail.fm - The way an email service should be

2010\12\21@021636 by Joshua Shriver

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For some reason I completely misread this. Was thinking Quad core
machines, and "Big Iron" as in old main frames, pdp-11's, or clusters.

Still cool to read the back story :)
-Jos

2010\12\21@042309 by alan.b.pearce

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> He has the full rig, with preamp, two power amps, and the two
> "sofa-back" style speakers.

Ah, the original electrostatic loudspeakers ... I remember those.
-- Scanned by iCritical.

2010\12\21@055624 by RussellMc

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part 1 1012 bytes content-type:text/plain; charset="iso-8859-1" (decoded quoted-printable)

> Transistors? Bah, that's new Quad. I have a friend whose Quads use
> KT66's. That's real Quad :)
>
> He has the full rig, with preamp, two power amps, and the two
> "sofa-back" style speakers.

Did you look at the site ? :-)

Amp, preamp

        http://www.quadmodsusa.com/quad%20amplifiers.html

AM & FM tuners

        http://www.quadmodsusa.com/quad%20Tuners.html

Something for every perverse-tion


________

Quad II

One of the most famous valve power amplifiers ever built. Quad made
about 100,000 of these between 1953 and 1969. Featuring the
'Acoustical' split-loading circuit mentioned in the Radio Designer's
Handbook and also used by McIntosh for many years.

22

The famous Quad 22 control unit is part of the Quad 22/II/II/FM/AM
system. None of the components is standalone. This control unit
pioneered the fabulous Quad variable-turnover filters. Featuring
wonderful Art Deco-like styling in moulded meta


     R


part 2 22605 bytes content-type:image/jpeg; name="c254326lv_81[1].jpg" (decode)


part 3 181 bytes content-type:text/plain; name="ATT00001.txt"
(decoded base64)

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http://www.piclist.com PIC/SX FAQ & list archive
View/change your membership options at
mailman.mit.edu/mailman/listinfo/piclist


'[EE] Source of B&W image sensors?'
2011\02\04@190716 by Philip Pemberton
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Hi guys,

I'm after a couple of CMOS or CCD image sensors for a project, but my searches are coming up dry... Does anyone have anything like this in their junk box?

  - Monochrome sensor (although a Bayer-pattern sensor might work for testing)
  - 640x480 resolution or thereabouts
  - 30fps at max resolution, but ideally somewhere around 750 to 1000fps max. with a window size of around 256x256.
  - Ideally some form of Subsampling or Windowing to allow frame rate to be increased
  - Ideally on-board A/D converter (though I can tack on an external one if absolutely necessary).
  - Nice, easy interface -- something I can wire up to an FPGA.

I did find the Cypress LUPA-300 (CYIL1SM0300AA) at Digikey, but at £216 and change plus VAT, it's a little on the expensive side. On the plus side, it'll do nearly 250fps at 640x480 monochrome, 488fps with 2:1 Vertical Subsampling (640x240 res), or 1076fps with Windowing set to a 256x256 square in the middle of the sensor.

Does anyone have anything similar in there junk box (even a bog-standard mono CCD / CMOS sensor I could use as a starting point would be useful), or know of any similar devices which might be worth considering?

"Easy interface" seems to be the killer. Some of the old Omnivision sensors were pretty easy to deal with (I2C control and pixel clock in, parallel data, data-valid and frame-sync out).

What I'm trying to do is build something along the lines of this:
  http://www.electricstuff.co.uk/ektapro.html

I'd rather not track down, buy and destroy an EktaPro, but I've got a couple of "Hamfest Special" CCTV cameras (erm.. actually... six) which I'm not averse to cannibalising for C-mount lens mounts. I've also got a couple of P8079 image intensifier tubes, and I think it would be rather neat to bolt one of those onto a LUPA300 or similar sensor.

Of course if anyone has a really good reason why this is a stupid idea, please feel free to speak up!

Thanks,
-- Phil.
spam_OUTpiclistTakeThisOuTspamphilpem.me.uk
http://www.philpem.me.uk/

2011\02\04@223951 by Harold Hallikainen

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I did a project with the MT9V032 . It has a parallel data bus. I ran it in
snapshot mode at about 12fps. I drove it directly with a 24HJ256GP610.
It'd run faster with an FPGA or PIC32 and in the other mode (not snapshot)
where the image is captured at the same time the previous image is shifted
out.

Harold


-- FCC Rules Updated Daily at http://www.hallikainen.com - Advertising
opportunities available

2011\02\05@050907 by Mike Harrison

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On Sat, 05 Feb 2011 00:07:11 +0000, you wrote:

{Quote hidden}

Since doing that Ektapro project I've kept an eye on what (little is available in the high-speed
sensor market) ..

High frame-rate sensors are always going to be niche and hence expensive .
AFAIK the Cypress one is the only 'affordable' one available - ISTR reading this product line has
just been bought by another manufacturer so don't be surprised if it disappears in the transition. Could be worth talking to a Cypress franchised disti as for specialised stuff it is often the case
that parts can be had way cheaper than places like Digikey (e.g. FPGAs can be  30-50% of the online
disti pricing) , although you may want to imply that you are designing something for production, not
a 1-off to get them interested..
There may be some conventional sensors that are amenable to higher rates with windowing, maybe
involving hacks like resetting part-frame (if this doesn't mess up the exposure timing) but doubt you'll get anywhere near the speed of the Cypress.

Pretty much all image sensors have a clock+parallel data interface and I2C or SPI control, although
for high-speed you tend to have multiple parallel interfaces for bandwidth. I'd expect any newer devices to move to LVDS, but shouldn;t be hard to interface to a FPGA.

You may want to look at the sensors used in the Casio consumer digital camas that can do high-speed,
if they are available. Or just buy one of the Casios...
http://exilim.casio.com/products_exf1.shtml

If you're interested in low light you definitely want a  mono sensor as teh  colour stripe filters
on colour ones lose a lot of light, and for high speed you need a LOT of light..!
I definitely wouldn't go down the Ektapro path like I did - it was a ridiculous amnount of work,
although a useful learning experience. Having said that I occasionally see later Ektapro kit like
the 4500 FPS version on Ebay USA for a steal (plus shipping!)

Here's a thread on 4HV from someone who built a camera around the Cypress : http://4hv.org/e107_plugins/forum/forum_viewtopic.php?38831

2011\02\05@182541 by Philip Pemberton

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On 05/02/11 10:09, Mike Harrison wrote:
> High frame-rate sensors are always going to be niche and hence expensive ..
> AFAIK the Cypress one is the only 'affordable' one available - ISTR reading this product line has
> just been bought by another manufacturer so don't be surprised if it disappears in the transition.

Hmm, interesting. It's still listed as a current product on Cypress's website.

The Micron image sensor group was spun off a bit ago -- as Aptina Imaging if memory serves. They don't really make anything particularly fast, though (they had a ~200fps sensor a few years back, but it's NLA).

> Could be worth talking to a Cypress franchised disti as for specialised stuff it is often the case
> that parts can be had way cheaper than places like Digikey (e.g. FPGAs can be  30-50% of the online
> disti pricing) , although you may want to imply that you are designing something for production, not
> a 1-off to get them interested..

I've had bad luck with the franchised distributors. My conversations with them usually go along the lines of:

"I want two of these parts to evaluate. Send me a quote."
"Bugger off."

Price-wise, though....

  - DigiKey: ordered on request, ETA back end of April. £216 plus VAT, and free Spanish Inquisition treatment.
  - Mouser: none in stock, 16 on order, £219 +VAT, ETA early May then three more at the end of May. £201 if I can get five interested folk together and do a bulk-order (hmm...).
  - Avnet -- no stock in Europe, £370 (!) if supplied from the US, plus VAT and duty; £244 if supplied from Asia, and they supply from multiple warehouses. VAT, duty and such to be added on top...

So it seems the franchised distis aren't all they're cracked up to be... (and Avnet are especially bad in my experience).

The thing I'd be most worried about is screwing up the design or assembly of the sensor board. Ruining a £250 image sensor would not be a great move.

> Pretty much all image sensors have a clock+parallel data interface and I2C or SPI control, although
> for high-speed you tend to have multiple parallel interfaces for bandwidth.
> I'd expect any newer devices to move to LVDS, but shouldn;t be hard to interface to a FPGA.

Yeah, the Lupa-1300 (the 300's successor) has 12 LVDS differential lines and a sync output. Tying that to an FPGA would bring you neatly into Virtex / Stratix territory.... eurrgh. Bloody fast frame rate though, especially if you enable windowing.

> You may want to look at the sensors used in the Casio consumer digital camas that can do high-speed,
> if they are available. Or just buy one of the Casios...
> http://exilim.casio.com/products_exf1.shtml

I was looking at the Fuji HS10, but while it'll hit 1000fps, it only manages that with a window size of 224x64. It's a colour sensor so low-light sensitivity is, pardon my French, crap.

> If you're interested in low light you definitely want a  mono sensor as teh  colour stripe filters
> on colour ones lose a lot of light, and for high speed you need a LOT of light..!

Which neatly rules out the Casio and Fuji sensors.

> Here's a thread on 4HV from someone who built a camera around the Cypress :
> http://4hv.org/e107_plugins/forum/forum_viewtopic.php?38831

That's more or less what I want to do, though with some form of cable or fibre link between the camera and acquisition unit.

-- Phil.
.....piclistKILLspamspam@spam@philpem.me.uk
http://www.philpem.me.uk/

2011\02\05@190715 by Mike Harrison

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On Sat, 05 Feb 2011 23:25:36 +0000, you wrote:

>On 05/02/11 10:09, Mike Harrison wrote:
>> High frame-rate sensors are always going to be niche and hence expensive .
>> AFAIK the Cypress one is the only 'affordable' one available - ISTR reading this product line has
>> just been bought by another manufacturer so don't be surprised if it disappears in the transition.
>
>Hmm, interesting. It's still listed as a current product on Cypress's
>website.

OnSemi have bought them -
http://finance.yahoo.com/news/ON-Semiconductor-Signs-bw-3115073553.html?x=0&.v=1


>I've had bad luck with the franchised distributors. My conversations
>with them usually go along the lines of:
>
>"I want two of these parts to evaluate. Send me a quote."
>"Bugger off."

The phrasing goes something like : "We're (always use plural to imply larger outfit)  considering designing this into a production
device with  projected volumes of <insert fictional value here> in the <insert plausible market
sector> industry. We are an  independent consultancy (invent name if necessary) doing
feasibiluty/proof of concept prototyping  and our customer won't allow us to disclose details.
{Quote hidden}

Yes, Avnet suck. Many years ago they refused to take my £2.5K order as cash with order  as I didn;t
have an account or trade refs to set one up. Still often a PITA nowadays and always the last on my
list to contact. Some of their sub-companies like EBV are OK on a good day.  
>Yeah, the Lupa-1300 (the 300's successor) has 12 LVDS differential lines
>and a sync output. Tying that to an FPGA would bring you neatly into
>Virtex / Stratix territory.... eurrgh. .

Really? can you not do the 3215MHz LVDS rate on a Spartan3 or similar ? The  Spartan 6 summary I just looked at claims a little over 1gbit for diff inputs so looks doable.
I think S6 may actually even be available now (how long after it was announced...?)

2011\02\05@191627 by Oli Glaser

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On 05/02/2011 23:25, Philip Pemberton wrote:
> Yeah, the Lupa-1300 (the 300's successor) has 12 LVDS differential lines
> and a sync output. Tying that to an FPGA would bring you neatly into
> Virtex / Stratix territory.... eurrgh.

Interesting, I have not used Xilinx FPGAs - you mean the e.g. Spartan series have no LVDS capable models?
With Actel (now Microsemi) the ProASIC3 250K gate which I'm currently using is ~£10 and has LVDS/LVPECL available.
Surely there are some cheap(ish) offerings from Altera or Lattice also - need to check all this myself as I would like to have more options FPGA wise, looked at/thinking of grabbing one of the "universal" programmers e.g. Amontec JTAGkey (I think that's the name, been a while since I looked, anyway something along those lines that avoids buying each separate programmer - that one does various ARM MCUs too IIRC)

2011\02\05@203728 by Philip Pemberton

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On 06/02/11 00:16, Oli Glaser wrote:
> Interesting, I have not used Xilinx FPGAs - you mean the e.g. Spartan
> series have no LVDS capable models?

Oh no -- the Spartan3 can do LVDS (in fact it has built in LVDS line transceivers and terminators!), as can the Altera Cyclone II and III. The problem is, you don't get many diff-pairs on a chip.

> With Actel (now Microsemi) the ProASIC3 250K gate which I'm currently
> using is ~£10 and has LVDS/LVPECL available.

I spotted those on Mouser's site this evening -- they look like they could be fun to play with. SRP of $50 for the programmer pod too, which isn't too bad.

> Surely there are some cheap(ish) offerings from Altera or Lattice also -
> need to check all this myself as I would like to have more options FPGA
> wise, looked at/thinking of grabbing one of the "universal" programmers
> e.g. Amontec JTAGkey (I think that's the name, been a while since I
> looked, anyway something along those lines that avoids buying each
> separate programmer - that one does various ARM MCUs too IIRC)

If you want to use the manufacturer's debugging tools (Chipscope, SignalTAP, etc.) then you need the manufacturer-specific programming pods. Altera pods are fiercely expensive, but have been reverse-engineered to the point where they work in UrJTAG and you can build a clone for about 25% of the RRP of Altera's pod. It's basically an FT245R tied to an Altera (or Xilinx, if you prefer) CPLD, which is then tied to a level-translator (optional, only needed if you want to use 2.5V or 1.8V parts).

I built a neat little hacked-together USB Blaster clone for about £35 (PCB was home-etched), and it'll go down to about 1.5V. To program the CPLD, I fished a Xilinx Parallel Cable III out of the spares bin, added some greenwires and an IDC header, and used UrJTAG to flash the Altera CPLD. Worked great.

-- Phil.
piclistspamKILLspamphilpem.me.uk
http://www.philpem.me.uk/

2011\02\05@204955 by Philip Pemberton

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On 06/02/11 00:07, Mike Harrison wrote:
> OnSemi have bought them -
> http://finance.yahoo.com/news/ON-Semiconductor-Signs-bw-3115073553.html?x=0&.v=1

Hm. One wonders what that'll do to parts availability, seeing as that part of Cypress has been rolled into ONSemi's military products group...

> The phrasing goes something like :
> "We're (always use plural to imply larger outfit)  considering designing this into a production
> device with  projected volumes of<insert fictional value here>  in the<insert plausible market
> sector>  industry. We are an  independent consultancy (invent name if necessary) doing
> feasibiluty/proof of concept prototyping  and our customer won't allow us to disclose details.

That's never worked for me either...

"We want more information."
"I can tell you it's a computer peripheral for a high-speed imaging application. That's all I can tell you."
"We'll sign an NDA."
"Not possible."
"Then we won't sell you the parts."

> Yes, Avnet suck. Many years ago they refused to take my £2.5K order as cash with order  as I didn;t
> have an account or trade refs to set one up. Still often a PITA nowadays and always the last on my
> list to contact. Some of their sub-companies like EBV are OK on a good day.

I used to have an credit-card account with MEMEC, with a minimum order of about £80. They were great for getting Ethernet PHY chips and stuff like that. Shortly after AVNET bought them out, I got a letter through the post which basically amounted to "we're closing your account, and we're not willing to tell you why, ha ha ha, fsck you."

I phoned them and asked for a better reason... this was an account in good standing, I'd had it for several years, and the best they came up with was:

"I'm not able to provide you with that information, under the Data Protection Act."
"Per the Data Protection Act, the subject of the data is permitted to request copies of that data, which is what I'm asking for. So tell me, why has my account been cancelled."
"I'm not at liberty to discuss that."
"I'd like to speak to your supervisor."
"I'm the head of department."  (yeah, RIGHT!)
"So who do you report to?"
"Nobody."

I've been treated better by PC World, and that's saying something. They insisted a dead PC mouse they'd sold me was "working fine"... without even having bothered to test it. Took over two hours of arguing before the store manager finally came out... and promptly asked the drone behind the "technical" desk why he hadn't even tested it.

"It's obviously not faulty."
"So you can magically prove it's working just by looking at it?"
"...."
"Go plug it into the testbench machine and test it. PROPERLY."

> Really? can you not do the 3215MHz LVDS rate on a Spartan3 or similar ?

Probably. Can't say I've tried though.
The Altera Cyclone II goes to about 700MHz per channel if memory serves, but most of those chips don't have many channels unless you go to BGA. Even with the hot-air station (Aoyue 852A), I'd rather not try and solder a BGA...

> The  Spartan 6 summary I just looked at claims a little over 1gbit for diff inputs so looks doable.
> I think S6 may actually even be available now (how long after it was announced...?)

"Xilinx: Where Everything's Announced, But Nothing's Available!"

OK, that's unfair. The XC9500XL CPLDs are available, and quite nice to play with. Cheaper than the Altera equivalents too, last time I checked.

-- Phil.
.....piclistKILLspamspam.....philpem.me.uk
http://www.philpem.me.uk/

2011\02\06@111846 by David VanHorn

picon face
I've used the Aptina parts.  Very nice, but basically no support
unless you have a signed contract for huge quantities.  Lots of
control registers which are all documented, but beyond that you are on
your own

2011\02\06@125241 by Herbert Graf

picon face
On Sun, 2011-02-06 at 00:16 +0000, Oli Glaser wrote:
> On 05/02/2011 23:25, Philip Pemberton wrote:
> > Yeah, the Lupa-1300 (the 300's successor) has 12 LVDS differential lines
> > and a sync output. Tying that to an FPGA would bring you neatly into
> > Virtex / Stratix territory.... eurrgh.
>
> Interesting, I have not used Xilinx FPGAs - you mean the e.g. Spartan
> series have no LVDS capable models?

Spartans can do PCIE/SATA, I assure you they can support pretty much any
modern IO standard you through at it.

Even the old Spartans support an astonishingly large number of IO
standards.

TTYL

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