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'[ot] need part number for a power plug'
2000\04\24@165535 by R. Denzer

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Sorry for the off topic everyone

But does anyone know the type and part number
and source where I can get a power plug
for a SONY vaio??

The sony folks won't cooperate with this. Don't blame them though.

It's a center pin type of plug,

anyone know of a super-store that has
every imaginable power plug where I
might start looking?

Thanks in adavance.

2000\04\25@121518 by Mark Willis

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(I haven't seen a Vaio, but have a few ideas on search algorithms.)

"Of all places", Radio Shack has quite a few connectors, including ones
with center pins, that fit their (usually unregulated) power adapters.
They even sell the display cable cluster they have, at the local RS.
$20 IIRC.  You might start with checking that - see if it fits.  If not,
get a pair of calipers and make some measurements and maybe take a
digital photo, e-mail it my way <G>  I may be overloaded thus slowish, I
do know where to look.

If it is a match, you can either just plain buy one for $2ish, or, write
down the measurements off the package (these are little 2-pin reversible
connectors, they also sell cables these can plug into.)  They're all
coded with a single letter.  Semi hard to connect to the connector ends
"cleanly" without buying their cables, not impossible though.  You may
want to consider keeping the connector end from falling off the end of
the cable if pulled (Superglue is your friend!  <G>)

>From having looked for a connector for a Fujitsu laptop I have, I know
they have 3-4 or so connectors in that cluster with center pins.

Once you know dimensions, you can go look through electronics books for
a match that has more traditional styling;  Mouser, DigiKey, etc. <G>

Worst case, it's also possible to make your own connector (especially
with access to a home shop), that's the HARD way, let's try the easy way
first <G>

 Mark

R. Denzer wrote:
{Quote hidden}

--
I re-ship for small US & overseas businesses, world-wide.
(For private individuals at cost; ask.)

2000\04\25@141139 by Nigel Goodwin

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In message <000701bfae2f$4f3320f0$09fb1118@c1051878a>, spam_OUTrden0TakeThisOuTspamhome.com
writes
>But does anyone know the type and part number
>and source where I can get a power plug
>for a SONY vaio??
>
>The sony folks won't cooperate with this. Don't blame them though.
>
>It's a center pin type of plug,

It's quite possible that's it's not available anywhere yet, Sony quite
commonly use a completely new connector that's isn't available anywhere
else - like on the Sony Playstations, which took a long time for third
party connectors to appear.
--

Nigel.

       /--------------------------------------------------------------\
       | Nigel Goodwin   | Internet : .....nigelgKILLspamspam@spam@lpilsley.co.uk           |
       | Lower Pilsley   | Web Page : http://www.lpilsley.co.uk       |
       | Chesterfield    | Official site for Shin Ki and New Spirit   |
       | England         |                 Ju Jitsu                   |
       \--------------------------------------------------------------/

2000\04\25@180211 by paulb

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Mark Willis wrote:

> Worst case, it's also possible to make your own connector (especially
> with access to a home shop), that's the HARD way, let's try the easy
> way first <G>

 May be fastest, though.  Ahh, Memories...

 Most of these connectors are moulded nowadays.  I have just recently
acquired a SNES - typical example of deliberate incompatibility.  Came
with no power supply {fairly standard plug as I see it} and two faulty
hand controllers, one Nintendo and one clone.  Interesting to note that
the genuine article had a demountable, repairable plug and was not
faulty {was rather a crack across the controller PCB} while the clone
has a moulded plug and of course that was where the cable breaks were.

 Consider however that if *they* can make a moulded plug - so can you.
It just won't look as nice.

 Find pins (from another plug on hand, e.g. DB-25) to fit the socket or
plug.  Glad Wrap over the socket and insert the pins through, ready
soldered to your cable.  You could use it like this!  Now have a sleeve,
probably a piece of PVC conduit which can be hot-shaped to different
cross-section, internally greased, slipped over the cable and puttied
onto the glad-wrapped panel around the socket.

 Sit the device plug-upward and fill with your choice of moulding
compound which might be neutral-cure silicone (dodgy), epoxy
(permanent), hot-melt glue (easily reversible) etc..

 Messy, but possibly far faster than finding the "real thing".  Is that
what you had in mind Mark?
--
 Cheers,
       Paul B.

2000\04\25@183821 by Mark Willis

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Paul B. Webster VK2BZC wrote:
{Quote hidden}

I think part of why I think it's the hard way, is that I usually get to
make "Many" - Tends to get into more work when making a production
mold.  Yes, I guess 1-off molds are not that hard, I tend to just buy
the real thing though when I can get it for $2ish!

For one-off's I just use 5-minute epoxy, usually - Works.  Just be SURE
you don't have to file it once set (Epoxy is rough to file.)  OTOH, a
2-wheel bench grinder does the trick pretty well...  There're a lot of
other casting plastics around that are far easier to file, which work
pretty well - Just watch the setting times as some, ah, "mis-estimate"
the pour time by about 20% or so (i.e. you make a mold, pour, and half
gets in - the rest gels while seeping down into the mold.)  Nothing like
learning from experience <G>  As a trick, you can use a teflon "tamping
rod" to help fill the mold (i.e. use a .260" hole, pour it full of
resin, insert a 0.250" teflon rod - gently and carefully, to displace
much of the resin into the mold cavity.)

A friend makes mold masters out of metal, wood, phenolics, ???  He's a
pretty good machinist.  I'd thought you could also make a master part
out of PCB material (i.e. use the unused parts off a PC board, have them
routed to rough shape for you with very good accuracy;  Set it up with
alignment pins so you can align it as you glue the slices together, then
final file the master to make a mold.)  Creativity is good <G>  Wax
works pretty well too, for the first master (If I could just FIND some
good hard modeling wax!)

There are re-workable plastics (can tear them out and re-seal the
part.)  For one-off's, again, 5 minute epoxy is THE tool to use!

Just be careful when getting casting resins other than epoxy, for
production - They LOVE to sell "packages" that consist of about 2L of
(2-part) casting resin for $20ish - It's designed to all be used at the
same time, though, a "One use pack";  You'd have to either decant it all
to another pair of containers, or use syringes to pull just enough from
each side of the soft seal in the center, for use at a time.

I have this laptop power cable that's just plain metal shop fodder, it's
sort of like a Mini-DIN version of a Din-4 connector, only different.
THE hard part for home making goodies is getting thin metal shields made
to match an existing part;  If anyone has good ideas on THAT, I'd like
to know more.  (Think it's about a 1/2" round metal shield piece about
1/2" long - also need a 1/10" by 1/2" rectangular metal piece, about 1/4
inch long, for another connector - I am thinking on that one.)

 Mark

2000\04\25@185100 by William Chops Westfield

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   I have this laptop power cable that's just plain metal shop fodder, it's
   sort of like a Mini-DIN version of a Din-4 connector, only different.
   THE hard part for home making goodies is getting thin metal shields made
   to match an existing part;  If anyone has good ideas on THAT, I'd like
   to know more.

If it's really a mini-din connector style (which seem to be very popular for
larger line-wart style power supplies, for some reason), just buy a mini-din
connector (that doesn't fit) and "adjust" the pins as necessary.  (probably
the easiest thing to do is buy one with lots of pins and break off the ones
that you don't want.)  If necessary, disolve or burn away all the non-metal
parts, and you'll be left with a shield...

BillW

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