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'[ot]: surface mount question...'
2001\02\28@134145 by rad0

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Can you use a surface mount chip one at a time?

Or must these things be 'installed' using a machine?

I'm thinking of myself as a hobbiest, building a prototype.

I just want to know if this can be done on a work bench


I'm assuming the surface mount stuff is much smaller and
more compact, this is their advantage right?

Thanks

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2001\02\28@140629 by t F. Touchton

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part 1 2019 bytes content-type:text/plain; charset=us-asciiYes

With a steady hand and a good eye it is easy.  Hot air pencil and paste is
easier than fine point iron, but iron is OK.  Just hold with tweezers and tack
each end down.

1206 package are good to start with... 0805 not too bad   0604  challenging and
I've only had a few tech's that can hand build 0402  (all numbers are package
sizes).  The real tiny RF stuff is usually done under 10X or greater
magnification.

Advantage is size (small and less parasitics)  and reduced board costs (size and
limited drilling).


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Can you use a surface mount chip one at a time?

Or must these things be 'installed' using a machine?

I'm thinking of myself as a hobbiest, building a prototype.

I just want to know if this can be done on a work bench


I'm assuming the surface mount stuff is much smaller and
more compact, this is their advantage right?

Thanks

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2001\02\28@141253 by Simon Ethier

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What exactly is a hot air pencil and paste ?  How does it works ?

thanks
----- Original Message -----
From: "Scott F. Touchton" <.....Scott.TouchtonKILLspamspam@spam@US.JDSUNIPHASE.COM>
To: <PICLISTspamKILLspamMITVMA.MIT.EDU>
Sent: Wednesday, February 28, 2001 2:01 PM
Subject: Re: [ot]: surface mount question...


> Yes
>
> With a steady hand and a good eye it is easy.  Hot air pencil and paste is
> easier than fine point iron, but iron is OK.  Just hold with tweezers and
tack
> each end down.
>
> 1206 package are good to start with... 0805 not too bad   0604
challenging and
> I've only had a few tech's that can hand build 0402  (all numbers are
package
> sizes).  The real tiny RF stuff is usually done under 10X or greater
> magnification.
>
> Advantage is size (small and less parasitics)  and reduced board costs
(size and
{Quote hidden}

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>   |
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>   |       To:     .....PICLISTKILLspamspam.....MITVMA.MIT.EDU
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>   |       cc:     (bcc: Scott Touchton/US/UNIPHASE)
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>   |       Subject:     [ot]: surface mount question...
|
>
>---------------------------------------------------------------------------
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{Quote hidden}

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2001\02\28@144814 by t F. Touchton

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part 1 4032 bytes content-type:text/plain; charset=us-asciiSorry... hot air pencil looks like a little soldering iron, but it blow a gentle
stream of hot air.  Solder paste is like solder, but it is the consistency of...
of....of....
well it can flow, but is very stiff.  You can dispense it from a syringe like
thing with a decent size nozzle.  You put some paste on each pad where the part
will be, lay the part on the paste, and use the hot air pencil to reflow the
paste (melt it.. like how solder melts).


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What exactly is a hot air pencil and paste ?  How does it works ?

thanks
{Original Message removed}
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2001\02\28@145436 by Duane Brantley

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Using a soldering iron can be done, but, like stated earlier, a good fine
point iron and experience is very helpful.  Small parts like resistors and
capacitors are easy, but when you start to solder fine pitch parts, it
becomes more of an art.  Remember, flux is your friend.  I would start by
practicing with some parts that you aren't going to be using.  Once you are
comfortable doing those (with no shorts, cold solder joints or anything else
that might cause problems) then tackle your project.

Duane Brantley
Engineering Tech.
General Bandwidth
Austin, TX 78727

{Original Message removed}

2001\02\28@152759 by severson

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> Sorry... hot air pencil looks like a little soldering iron,
> but it blow a gentle stream of hot air.

DARN HOT air, as you can well imagine. And "gentle" enough to blow little
parts off the PCB...


> Solder paste is like solder, but it is
> the consistency of...
> of....of....

Toothpaste?

Imagine a mix of paste flux and solder "dust".

> well it can flow, but is very stiff.  You can dispense it
> from a syringe like
> thing with a decent size nozzle.  You put some paste on each
> pad where the part
> will be, lay the part on the paste, and use the hot air
> pencil to reflow the
> paste (melt it.. like how solder melts).


-Robert Severson
http://www.usbmicro.com
http://usbsimm.home.att.net
http://www.jged.com
http://www.annatechnology.com

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2001\02\28@174340 by Dan Goddard

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At 02:28 PM 2/28/01 -0600, you wrote:
> > Sorry... hot air pencil looks like a little soldering iron,
> > but it blow a gentle stream of hot air.
>
>DARN HOT air, as you can well imagine. And "gentle" enough to blow little
>parts off the PCB...

Remember that hot air stations may be a little bit pricey for the average
hobbyist. I'd recommend 30 - 40 AWG solder a super sharp tip, and lots of
flux. Remember to wash your boards, as alot of water soluble flux is a bit
conductive when it dries.  Rob, doesn't your air station have an adjustable
air-flow? :)

Cheers


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Danny Goddard
Design Engineer
ARMA Design
Tel:(858) 549-2531
Fax:(858) 549-2594
Email: dan_goddardspamspam_OUTarmanet.com
Web: http://www.armanet.com



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'[ot]: surface mount question...'
2001\03\01@012848 by Mark Whittington
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> Remember that hot air stations may be a little bit pricey for the average
> hobbyist. I'd recommend 30 - 40 AWG solder a super sharp tip, and lots of

That was going to be my next question -- where can I get a hot air pencil
for less than $800 :)

-Mark

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2001\03\01@052716 by Roman Black

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Dan Goddard wrote:

> Remember that hot air stations may be a little bit pricey for the average
> hobbyist. I'd recommend 30 - 40 AWG solder a super sharp tip, and lots of
> flux. Remember to wash your boards, as alot of water soluble flux is a bit
> conductive when it dries.  Rob, doesn't your air station have an adjustable
> air-flow?:)

I saw a few hobby robotics people are now using
"toaster ovens" that you can buy for $50 or less.
Most of these are temperature controlled to 250
degrees C and have timers. I just priced one
for about US $50 in Big-W store the other day.

Do a web search for "robot + toaster oven" and
you should find it. Seems the main problem was
getting an oven with a smooth door, so opening
the door after reflowing didn't jostle the boards
inside and move the parts before the solder cooled.

We are adding SMD to our manufacturing in a couple
of weeks. We will go the toaster oven way...
Prefer to do 10 boards at once! :o)
-Roman

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2001\03\01@162503 by Peter L. Peres

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>> Sorry... hot air pencil looks like a little soldering iron,
>> but it blow a gentle stream of hot air.
>
>DARN HOT air, as you can well imagine. And "gentle" enough to blow little
>parts off the PCB...

Actually it is solwer than a hairdryer on 'low' and the heat is about 250
to 350 degrees C depending on what you set on the thermostat and the air
control. It takes a few seconds for it to work (slower than direct contact
iron).

Peter

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2001\03\05@033206 by Mark Hull

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Hi Roman

I worked for a company that used a simple grill as a reflow oven.
Basically it's a heating element supported above a structure that allows a pan
to be positioned at three different heights below the element.
Sometimes it's referred to as a TV grill.
The two 'tricks' to the process is to have the correct size pads on the board, and
to "pre heat" the board properly.
The pad size is important, because as the solder paste melts and forms a bead, the surface tension drags the component to the correct place, thus allowing for inaccurate manual placement of the components.
The pre heat stage was basically placing the tray containing the board(s) on the
lower shelf for 2 minutes.
The idea is to heat the components slowly to reflow point, thus releaving the thermal stress
of hitting them with the reflow heat immediately
After the pre heat, the tray is moved to the top shelf for no more than 30 seconds.
Jolting the boards isn't realy a problem because the aforementioned surface tension tends
to be quite tenacious at holding the components if the pads are correctly designed.

Cheers
Mark

PS off topic question for you Roman. What TV standard is used in Australia?
I need to send a video tape to someone in Australia, and I'm not sure if it's compatable.     ---------------------------------------------------------------------
Mark Hull
Engineering / Technical
EMS (Africa) (Pty) Ltd
PO Box 1026, Melville, 2109, South Africa
Ph + 27 11 482 4470, Fax +27 11 726 2552

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