Searching \ for '[PIC]: PIC student' in subject line. ()
Make payments with PayPal - it's fast, free and secure! Help us get a faster server
FAQ page: techref.massmind.org/techref/microchip/devices.htm?key=pic
Search entire site for: 'PIC student'.

Exact match. Not showing close matches.
PICList Thread
'[PIC]: PIC student'
2001\02\08@150808 by Olin Lathrop

face picon face
> I'm a 5th college student from the Philippines.
> I'm studying sir in Manila, Philippines.
> I'm majoring sir in Electronics Engineering.
> I'm quite a beginner sir in PIC programming, but
> I was assigned to do a school thesis in which
> I'm to measure body temperature using a PIC.
> Our school sir really don't teach PIC software development
> or assembly language. It is up to us to learn.
> And I really want to be an expert in PIC software development.
> Thank you very much sir Olin. God Bless.
> Best regards.

It's time to drop that patronising "sir" crap.

If the data sheets are too hard to understand, you should start with a basic
introductory book on microcontrollers.  I think there are several available
that use PICs as examples.  Others on this list can probably suggest
specific titles.  Just giving you code won't solve the real problem, which
is learning about embeded microcontrollers, not getting this particular
project done.

As far as the project goes, you need to measure temperature with high
accuracy, but only need to do so over a very limited range around 37C.
Thermisters are very sensitive, but non-linear and vary from unit to unit.
My first knee jerk reaction is to use a 16F870 (or just get a few '876 to
have around for this project and whatever else comes up).  Use an analog
circuit so that even with thermister part variation, the 32C to 42C range
always comes out within the 0-5V A/D range.  Even if it only ends up
covering 2V, you still have about 400 counts over 10 degress C.  That leaves
plenty of headroom to do the linearization in software.  Since this is a low
speed signal, you have lots of cycles available for this, even if it takes
something like a 4th order polynomial.  I would deal with the part
variations by running each one thru a calibration sequence and saving the
calibration parameters (polynomial coeficients ?) in the EEPROM.


*****************************************************************
Olin Lathrop, embedded systems consultant in Devens MassacLIO/tts
(978) 772-3129, spam_OUTolinTakeThisOuTspamembedinc.com, http://www.embedinc.com

--
http://www.piclist.com hint: The PICList is archived three different
ways.  See http://www.piclist.com/#archives for details.


2001\02\08@155122 by M. Adam Davis

flavicon
face
Olin Lathrop wrote:
> It's time to drop that patronising "sir" crap.

It is required in his native language to specify, in nearly every
sentence, whether one is in a position of authority over, a peer of, or
subservient to the individual one is speaking with.  By not doing so one
risks offense.

There isn't an english word for peer, so he is erring on the safe side of
honoring you, Olin, so that you won't be offended.  It is a completely
foreign concept to him to not include such honorific, and may take some
time for him to change his habits.  It's not his intention to be
patronising.

I am glad, however, that you are helping him to learn some of the finer
points of english.  In my communications with him I never mentioned this,
and I suppose I should have taken the opportunity as well.

-Adam

--
http://www.piclist.com hint: The PICList is archived three different
ways.  See http://www.piclist.com/#archives for details.


2001\02\08@161231 by Alejandro Fubini

flavicon
picon face
Olin,

There is a very good PIC tutorial based on the 16C84 which was written by
John Becker of EPE http://www.epemag.wimborne.co.uk

It was a three part tutorial which came in the March 98, April 98, and May
98 editions of their magazine and it's how I got started, it takes you from
building a simple programmer to turning LEDs on and off to driving LCD
displays and much more. I don't believe this tutorial is available for
download, but i'm sure you can buy the back issues or if you ask them nicely
they may send you some photocopies. They have a message board within their
web site and John Becker posts in there so you may try contacting him that
way.

There is also a mini tutorial which is available for free from their web
site and it covers the 16F87x family, however, this tutorial assumes you
have a good understanding of microcontrollers.

Good luck
--Alex

{Original Message removed}

2001\02\08@162013 by Alejandro Fubini

flavicon
picon face
Sorry Olin, I confused names  :)

-----Original Message-----
From: pic microcontroller discussion list
[.....PICLISTKILLspamspam@spam@MITVMA.MIT.EDU]On Behalf Of Alejandro Fubini
Sent: Thursday, February 08, 2001 4:13 PM
To: PICLISTspamKILLspamMITVMA.MIT.EDU
Subject: Re: [PIC]: PIC student


Olin,

There is a very good PIC tutorial based on the 16C84 which was written by
John Becker of EPE http://www.epemag.wimborne.co.uk

It was a three part tutorial which came in the March 98, April 98, and May
98 editions of their magazine and it's how I got started, it takes you from
building a simple programmer to turning LEDs on and off to driving LCD
displays and much more. I don't believe this tutorial is available for
download, but i'm sure you can buy the back issues or if you ask them nicely
they may send you some photocopies. They have a message board within their
web site and John Becker posts in there so you may try contacting him that
way.

There is also a mini tutorial which is available for free from their web
site and it covers the 16F87x family, however, this tutorial assumes you
have a good understanding of microcontrollers.

Good luck
--Alex

-----Original Message-----
From: pic microcontroller discussion list
[.....PICLISTKILLspamspam.....MITVMA.MIT.EDU]On Behalf Of Olin Lathrop
Sent: Thursday, February 08, 2001 1:15 PM
To: EraseMEPICLISTspam_OUTspamTakeThisOuTMITVMA.MIT.EDU
Subject: [PIC]: PIC student


{Quote hidden}

It's time to drop that patronising "sir" crap.

If the data sheets are too hard to understand, you should start with a basic
introductory book on microcontrollers.  I think there are several available
that use PICs as examples.  Others on this list can probably suggest
specific titles.  Just giving you code won't solve the real problem, which
is learning about embeded microcontrollers, not getting this particular
project done.

As far as the project goes, you need to measure temperature with high
accuracy, but only need to do so over a very limited range around 37C.
Thermisters are very sensitive, but non-linear and vary from unit to unit.
My first knee jerk reaction is to use a 16F870 (or just get a few '876 to
have around for this project and whatever else comes up).  Use an analog
circuit so that even with thermister part variation, the 32C to 42C range
always comes out within the 0-5V A/D range.  Even if it only ends up
covering 2V, you still have about 400 counts over 10 degress C.  That leaves
plenty of headroom to do the linearization in software.  Since this is a low
speed signal, you have lots of cycles available for this, even if it takes
something like a 4th order polynomial.  I would deal with the part
variations by running each one thru a calibration sequence and saving the
calibration parameters (polynomial coeficients ?) in the EEPROM.


*****************************************************************
Olin Lathrop, embedded systems consultant in Devens MassacLIO/tts
(978) 772-3129, olinspamspam_OUTembedinc.com, http://www.embedinc.com

--
http://www.piclist.com hint: The PICList is archived three different
ways.  See http://www.piclist.com/#archives for details.

--
http://www.piclist.com hint: The PICList is archived three different
ways.  See http://www.piclist.com/#archives for details.

--
http://www.piclist.com hint: The PICList is archived three different
ways.  See http://www.piclist.com/#archives for details.


2001\02\08@164634 by Scott Dattalo

face
flavicon
face
On Thu, 8 Feb 2001, M. Adam Davis wrote:

> Olin Lathrop wrote:
> > It's time to drop that patronising "sir" crap.
>
> It is required in his native language to specify, in nearly every
> sentence, whether one is in a position of authority over, a peer of, or
> subservient to the individual one is speaking with.  By not doing so one
> risks offense.
>
> There isn't an english word for peer, so he is erring on the safe side of
> honoring you, Olin, so that you won't be offended.  It is a completely
> foreign concept to him to not include such honorific, and may take some
> time for him to change his habits.  It's not his intention to be
> patronising.
>
> I am glad, however, that you are helping him to learn some of the finer
> points of english.  In my communications with him I never mentioned this,
> and I suppose I should have taken the opportunity as well.

Actually Adam, you should teach him the finer points of sarcasm. :)

Scott

--
http://www.piclist.com hint: The PICList is archived three different
ways.  See http://www.piclist.com/#archives for details.


More... (looser matching)
- Last day of these posts
- In 2001 , 2002 only
- Today
- New search...