Searching \ for '[OT] lightfield camera ...' in subject line. ()
Make payments with PayPal - it's fast, free and secure! Help us get a faster server
FAQ page: techref.massmind.org/techref/index.htm?key=lightfield+camera
Search entire site for: 'lightfield camera ...'.

Exact match. Not showing close matches.
PICList Thread
'[OT] lightfield camera ...'
2011\07\12@203042 by Roger, in Bangkok

face
flavicon
face
.... exceedingly cool!
http://www.lytro.com/picture_gallery


Ri

2011\07\13@112257 by Herbert Graf

picon face
On Wed, 2011-07-13 at 07:30 +0700, Roger, in Bangkok wrote:
> ... exceedingly cool!
> http://www.lytro.com/picture_gallery

Doesn't seem to work properly in Firefox for me, works great with
Chrome.

It's very cool tech. You basically give up resolution for post focusing.

It also allows one to build fixed focus cameras (much less complicated
lenses) that deal with focus afterwards (i.e. cell phone cameras).

At the moment the tech is very limiting, I think with a modern ~15MP
sensor you end up with pictures of VGA resolution. So we've a ways to
go.

That said, when 100MP+ sensors become mainstream (assuming the all the
issues with sensors with such tiny receive sites are sorted) this will
be very cool tech that likely every camera will eventually have (like
today where you can post process white balance and colour, you'll be
able to post process your focus).

TTYL

2011\07\13@113909 by Isaac Marino Bavaresco

flavicon
face
Em 13/7/2011 12:27, Herbert Graf escreveu:
> It's very cool tech. You basically give up resolution for post focusing.
>
> It also allows one to build fixed focus cameras (much less complicated
> lenses) that deal with focus afterwards (i.e. cell phone cameras).
>
> At the moment the tech is very limiting, I think with a modern ~15MP
> sensor you end up with pictures of VGA resolution. So we've a ways to
> go.

When I saw it I thought that he used a camera on a tripod and took
several pictures with different focus settings (or perhaps a camera that
does it automatically).

2011\07\13@115134 by Herbert Graf

picon face
On Wed, 2011-07-13 at 12:38 -0300, Isaac Marino Bavaresco wrote:
> Em 13/7/2011 12:27, Herbert Graf escreveu:
> > It's very cool tech. You basically give up resolution for post focusing..
> >
> > It also allows one to build fixed focus cameras (much less complicated
> > lenses) that deal with focus afterwards (i.e. cell phone cameras).
> >
> > At the moment the tech is very limiting, I think with a modern ~15MP
> > sensor you end up with pictures of VGA resolution. So we've a ways to
> > go.
>
> When I saw it I thought that he used a camera on a tripod and took
> several pictures with different focus settings (or perhaps a camera that
> does it automatically).

That is one way you can do it, similar to how people shoot HDR type
photos. The issue of course is your subject must be identical between
shots, sometimes that's easy, sometimes that's impossible (classic
example is something like a picture with the ocean in it, the waves are
never the same).

This camera tech OTOH shoots all those pictures at once, so you can
capture pretty much any seen.


TTYL

2011\07\13@120408 by Isaac Marino Bavaresco

flavicon
face
Em 13/7/2011 12:38, Isaac Marino Bavaresco escreveu:
> Em 13/7/2011 12:27, Herbert Graf escreveu:
>> It's very cool tech. You basically give up resolution for post focusing.
>>
>> It also allows one to build fixed focus cameras (much less complicated
>> lenses) that deal with focus afterwards (i.e. cell phone cameras).
>>
>> At the moment the tech is very limiting, I think with a modern ~15MP
>> sensor you end up with pictures of VGA resolution. So we've a ways to
>> go.
> When I saw it I thought that he used a camera on a tripod and took
> several pictures with different focus settings (or perhaps a camera that
> does it automatically).


I just accessed their website again and I'm not convinced about their
explanation:

"The light field sensor captures the color, intensity and vector
direction of the rays of light"

Vector direction? How can a sensor capture a light ray that is going to
a different direction than its own?

I think a much simpler approach would be a camera with a multi-focal
lens that exposes the same image over different areas of the sensor
(like a bee-vision), each with a different focus setting.

There would not be necessary too many different focus regions, because
after some distance one focus fits all.


Isaac

2011\07\13@141253 by Isaac Marino Bavaresco

flavicon
face
Em 13/7/2011 13:04, Isaac Marino Bavaresco escreveu:
{Quote hidden}

OK, after reading further things make more sense (the guy wrote a PhD
thesis about the subject), but some statements are still suspicious:

"Unlike regular digital or film cameras, which can only record a scene
in two-dimensions, light field cameras captures all of the light rays
traveling in every direction through a scene"

2011\07\13@141617 by Robert Rolf

picon face

Herbert Graf wrote:

{Quote hidden}

Given that cameras these days are shooting 30 FPS HD video, it would be trivial for the firmware to simply drive the focus over a range while shooting a number of frames, so negligible motion between frames.
May be possible to do this with a script for the Canon SDK.

R

2011\07\13@142307 by Herbert Graf

picon face
On Wed, 2011-07-13 at 12:16 -0600, Robert Rolf wrote:
> Given that cameras these days are shooting 30 FPS HD video, it would be
> trivial for the firmware to simply drive the focus over a range while
> shooting a number of frames, so negligible motion between frames.
> May be possible to do this with a script for the Canon SDK.

That could work for some situations. I don't know how many photos would
be needed to be useful.

I'm sure when that if/when lightfield becomes a sought after feature
other camera makers will use schemes like this to approximate the
feature with minimal effort. Similar to how some cameras use "digital
image stabilization" to avoid having to do it optically.

TTYL

More... (looser matching)
- Last day of these posts
- In 2011 , 2012 only
- Today
- New search...