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PICList Thread
'[OT] Wireless internet options'
2006\03\30@110423 by John Pearson

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I have dialup internet.

Is there a way to go wireless with dialup? Otions?

If not, can I go wireless with DSL? Options?

Thanks

2006\03\30@111446 by andrew kelley

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You can get wireless internet from verizon or tmobile(better deal with
tmobile) but as far as i remember dialup over a cellphone doesnt work
too well.. I have done it, but I only got at most 1200 baud out of
it.(in analog mode, because digital was chunking the data up and
messing it up, but analog worked)

andrew

2006\03\30@122100 by Rolf

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John Pearson wrote:
> I have dialup internet.
>
> Is there a way to go wireless with dialup? Otions?
>
> If not, can I go wireless with DSL? Options?
>
> Thanks
>  
Yes, if you try hard. I could do this with my computer junk at home + 1
wireless access point or "broadband router", and here's how I would put
it together....

1. Build a linux box - get the box to do dialup for you (pppd).
2. Get a network card in the box, and get it to connect to the wireless
access point.
3. Set up your Linux "firewall" to Masquerade the wireless connection.
(see things like "Netfilter", IPTables, or "NAT")

Basically, it can be done. I could do it with perhaps a day to remember
what I need to know, and get it all going. You would need a dedicated
computer to manage the PPP and also route the traffic between your
internal network (accessed via the wireless hub), and the internet.

www.linux.com/howtos/IP-Masquerade-HOWTO/dial-on-demand.shtml
is one reference that sort of puts it together. The fact that it is a
wireless access point instead of a network hub is irrelevant.

Do searches for PPPd and Linux firewalls. In fact, it looks like
http://www.wifi.com.ar/english/cdrouter.html or
http://www.zeroshell.net/eng/ may be a "LiveCD" solution that will just
work! Burn the CD, boot the computer and try it.

Rolf


2006\03\30@123432 by William Chops Westfield

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On Mar 30, 2006, at 8:05 AM, John Pearson wrote:

> I have dialup internet.
> Is there a way to go wireless with dialup? Otions?
> If not, can I go wireless with DSL? Options?
>
If you mean "my connection to the internet is via dialup, but
I'd like to have local wireless 802.11 network as well", then
yes that's possible.  Wireless access point and the router to
the internet connection need not share a box...

However, you may find that this is far enough from a "standard"
configuration that it is difficult and/or expensive.

DSL would definitely be easier.  Like cable, DSL connections
"appear" ethernet-like after the "modem", and one of the common
combination routers (ethernet to SP, ethernet to home, wireless
to home) will work with either one.

BillW

2006\03\30@131342 by Herbert Graf

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On Thu, 2006-03-30 at 08:05 -0800, John Pearson wrote:
> I have dialup internet.
>
> Is there a way to go wireless with dialup? Otions?

Absolutely. A little rare these days, but there are routers with serial
ports on them that connect to a dialup modem. Generally these ports are
used as a "fallback" in case the broadband connection goes down, but
there's nothing stopping you from using it as your main connection.

Another obvious option is a linux box running one of the router distros.

> If not, can I go wireless with DSL? Options?

Absolutely. If the DSL modem does Ethernet, and your DSL provider uses a
standard connection method almost any consumer router will do.

TTYL

-----------------------------
Herbert's PIC Stuff:
http://repatch.dyndns.org:8383/pic_stuff/

2006\03\30@131924 by Gerhard Fiedler

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William ChopsWestfield wrote:

> On Mar 30, 2006, at 8:05 AM, John Pearson wrote:
>
>> I have dialup internet.
>> Is there a way to go wireless with dialup? Otions?
>> If not, can I go wireless with DSL? Options?
>>
> If you mean "my connection to the internet is via dialup, but I'd like to
> have local wireless 802.11 network as well", then yes that's possible.
> Wireless access point and the router to the internet connection need not
> share a box...

But they may :)

I don't use that type of wireless LAN and I don't use dialup, so that's
pure thin air :)

There seem to be NAT routers with built-in backup dialup capability, and
there seem to be NAT routers with built-in wireless access points, so maybe
you can find a NAT router with built-in backup dialup /and/ wireless access
point capability.

Gerhard

2006\03\30@171618 by Danny Sauer

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Rolf wrote regarding 'Re: [OT] Wireless internet options' on Thu, Mar 30 at 11:25:
> 1. Build a linux box - get the box to do dialup for you (pppd).
> 2. Get a network card in the box, and get it to connect to the wireless
> access point.
> 3. Set up your Linux "firewall" to Masquerade the wireless connection.
> (see things like "Netfilter", IPTables, or "NAT")

Step 2 is not required at this point.  Just put a decent wireless card
in the Linux box and run in "ad-hoc" mode.  Save the cost of the
access point, and gain better control over the way traffic goes over
the wireless access point.  I'm doing it this way, and it allows me to
lock down access so that the wireless connections can *only* get to
the VPN server, but VPN connections are treated essentially like
local.  It's nice, since you can get real, useful encrytion on the VPN
(instead of that joke known as WEP), and you can just leave the
wireless access wide open so it's easier to set up on a new machine
- no giant unintelligible key to remember, just VPN setup information.
:)

Actually, I'm also running a catch-all DNS server and web server with
a note letting would-be freeloaders know that they're wasting their
time.  It's fun having a wide-open access piont that's not really
wide-open at all. :)

--Danny

2006\03\30@175900 by Gerhard Fiedler

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Danny Sauer wrote:

> Just put a decent wireless card in the Linux box and run in "ad-hoc"
> mode.  Save the cost of the access point, and gain better control over
> the way traffic goes over the wireless access point.  

Pretty cool. Do you get a similar range card-to-card as you would get with
AP-to-card?

Gerhard

2006\03\31@093613 by M. Adam Davis

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If you use windows, your easiest and cheapest route is to keep
connecting to the internet with the modem in the computer that
currently connects via modem.  Drop a wireless card into that
computer, and under the network connections share the dialup internet
connection with the wireless card.  Set up the wireless card in ad-hoc
mode and you're all set to go.  You can even use a USB wireless device
so you don't have to open the computer.

DSL is easy to make wireless, and in fact the DSL provider in my area
ships a free dsl modem with built in wireless to all  new customers by
default.  If yours doesn't, it's very easy to connect a wireless
router/access point to the DSL modem they give you when you sign up.

Quite frankly I think you're better off going with DSL - the cost may
not be much more - I believe we're paying $30/month for 1944kpbs down
and 512kbps up.  The kicker is that we're buying it bundled and you
may have to pay more if you don't also buy their phone service.

Good luck!

-Adam

On 3/30/06, John Pearson <spam_OUTxeroTakeThisOuTspamcmc.net> wrote:
> I have dialup internet.
>
> Is there a way to go wireless with dialup? Otions?
>
> If not, can I go wireless with DSL? Options?
>
> Thanks
> -

2006\03\31@101223 by Danny Sauer

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Gerhard wrote regarding 'Re: [OT] Wireless internet options' on Thu, Mar 30 at 17:04:
> Danny Sauer wrote:
>
> > Just put a decent wireless card in the Linux box and run in "ad-hoc"
> > mode.  Save the cost of the access point, and gain better control over
> > the way traffic goes over the wireless access point.  
>
> Pretty cool. Do you get a similar range card-to-card as you would get with
> AP-to-card?

It's comparable, but as with anything radio, the environemnt has a big
effect. :)  The card I'm using on the gateway machine is an Orinoco
(Lucent-based) PCMCIA card in a PCI-PCMCIA adaptor, and it uses an
external antenna.  I'm pretty confident that the external antenna
makes a world of difference...  If nothing else, it allows me to place
the machine in the basement, so my wife can have a clean,
computer-free living area. ;)

--Danny

2006\03\31@141112 by Dwayne Reid

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At 08:12 AM 3/31/2006, Danny Sauer wrote:
> >
> > > Just put a decent wireless card in the Linux box and run in "ad-hoc"
> > > mode.  Save the cost of the access point, and gain better control over
> > > the way traffic goes over the wireless access point.
> >
> > Pretty cool. Do you get a similar range card-to-card as you would get with
> > AP-to-card?
>
>It's comparable, but as with anything radio, the environemnt has a big
>effect. :)  The card I'm using on the gateway machine is an Orinoco
>(Lucent-based) PCMCIA card in a PCI-PCMCIA adaptor, and it uses an
>external antenna.  I'm pretty confident that the external antenna
>makes a world of difference...  If nothing else, it allows me to place
>the machine in the basement, so my wife can have a clean,
>computer-free living area. ;)

The other technique that works well is to use one of those USB wifi
dongles at the end of a suitable USB extension cable.

I've done that a few times now, whereas a wifi card in the computer
(no external antenna) was marginal.  One installation was in a
basement with the computer sitting on the concrete floor.  Changing
to a USB dongle mounted just under the desktop made all the difference.

dwayne

--
Dwayne Reid   <.....dwaynerKILLspamspam@spam@planet.eon.net>
Trinity Electronics Systems Ltd    Edmonton, AB, CANADA
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'[OT] Wireless internet options'
2006\04\01@121326 by picdude
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Hi all,

Back on the PIClist again after many months, and one of the reasons I
disappeared is this same reason -- that I did not have a good internet
connection.  I finally bit the bullet a month ago and got Verizon
wireless (cellular).  It is awesome!  Mostly.  Some parts of rural
Texas I got little better than dialup (a speed test showed 80 kpbs).
In Austin I got ~180-200 kbps.  Still not the 350-700kbps that Verizon
claimed, until yesterday when I reached Florida, and I'm now getting
over 700kbps!  Feels like my previous cablemodem connection.  And I
could get really good speed on the side of the highway in Alabama
yesterday.

$80 per month, but for a few more dollars I get to be mobile and it's
worth it to me.

Sprint has the same system as Verizon and the same pricing, but I
wouldn't touch them due to their really really poor customer service.

T-mobile & Cingular use GPRS/Edge, which has a claimed speed of 224kbps,
but realistically would get only about half that.  But yes, they're much
lower cost (like $30/mth IIRC).

I intend to get it running via Linux (all fingers crossed), then share
the connection to the other computers, once I get settled in.

Cheers,
-Neil.



> ---{Original Message removed}

2006\04\03@050656 by Nate Duehr

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picdude@narwani.net wrote:

> I intend to get it running via Linux (all fingers crossed), then share
> the connection to the other computers, once I get settled in.

Their Acceptable Use Policy in your contract expressly forbids that type
of use, I believe.

They also have been sending "nasty-grams" to people they deem are using
"too much" bandwidth on their network.  They've also cancelled some
people's contracts over it, apparently.  Google around a bit on it.

Typical Verizon - deploy great technology then cripple it with retarded
legalistic limitations and firmware modifications to make the really
useful/interesting features disappear... then come out with your own
version and charge more for it... even though the phone already did it
off-the-shelf.

They want to sell you crap over VCast, they don't want to be in the
business of ISP.

I did see a rather funny thing on a guy's webpage recently about how to
GET the cell companies to dump your contract if you're trying to get out
of one...

Basically the general theme of it was that even though cell companies no
longer charge for "roaming" on almost any plan, they're still paying
each other through the nose for roaming charges.

So if you're dying to get dumped -- so you can switch companies, get a
new phone, whatever... you just travel to rural areas where you KNOW the
phone is not on the home network but you're still in your plan's FREE
area, and then dial up something for hours and hours and hours on end.

Supposedly it works... they'll drop you like a hot potato, and some even
have words to this effect buried deep in your contract.

No reason to try it here, myself, but entertaining that folks figured it
out... and published it...

Nate

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