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'[OT] Re: Fire in the Hole!!!'
2000\04\26@173109 by Bill Pierce

picon face
<x-flowed>Those sound fun but try putting a 6-cell nicad in your pocket and having
your key ring short it. I was out of my pants faster than anything and
everybody around was having a great time laughing at me. The pants have a
hole burned in the pocket and I have a scar to remind me.

Bill


{Quote hidden}

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</x-flowed>

2000\04\26@181237 by jamesnewton

face picon face
When I was in the NAVY, I was amazed to find that the battery in the S3
aircraft has the power terminals in a little recessed box about an inch and
a half high and 2 or 3 inches wide near the top of one side. They are about
an inch apart (brilliant right there) and if you carry one with your arms
down straight, the power connector rests exactly at the level of your belt.
And in the Navy you MUST wear this little solid metal belt buckle which is
about an inch high and 2 inches wide...  a perfect fit.

I never saw this happen, but I understand that the battery would arc weld
itself to the buckle and while the belt was working on burning in half
('cuase you couldn't unbuckle it now could you?) the battery was melting and
pouring acid down your crotch.

note to the ladies: All the men on the PICList currently have their legs
crossed.

<GRIN>

Some day I'll have to tell you my ejection seat story.


---
James Newton (PICList Admin #3)
.....jamesnewtonKILLspamspam.....piclist.com 1-619-652-0593
PIC/PICList FAQ: http://www.piclist.com or .org

{Original Message removed}

2000\04\26@194444 by Joe Colquitt

face picon face
> From: Bill Pierce
>
> Those sound fun but try putting a 6-cell nicad in your pocket and having
> your key ring short it.

My sister showed me a tip in one of her women's mags about extending
the lifetime of batteries. "Put them in the fridge" they said.

Oh, and "wrap them in kitchen foil to keep the moisture out"

How many people now think that refrigerators flatten batteries ?

2000\04\26@200707 by Ken Webster

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James Newton wrote:
>Some day I'll have to tell you my ejection seat story.


Eh?  This sounds good.  Please tell.


I have another coupple of stories: (promise to shut up soon :o)

When I was in junior high school I was playing around with DC-DC converters
for xenon flash tubes.  After accidentally discovering that you can get
quite a jolt from them, I pieced together a tiny "zapper" (for practical
joke purposes) consisting of a 9V battery, 555 timer, small potcore
transformer, rectifier, and capacitor.  The circuit would charge a .47uF
capacitor to 1200V -- enough to momentarilly give you the sensation that
your arm had been yanked out of its socket if you were unfortunate enough to
touch it (at least that's how I remember it and I don't care to try it again
to see if it hurts any less now that I'm grown up).

One day I was toying with the idea of leaving the "zapper" hidden in a pants
pocket and running a cable out under my clothes to a plug I could conceal in
my hand.  I connected a coaxial cable to the "zapper" with a bannana plug on
the end that I could touch my victims with.  To test it, I zapped various
metal objects and marveled at the nifty sparks produced when the capacitor
discharged.  One object I got especially nice sparks from was an iron pipe
which I was stupid enough to pick up with my other hand to go show my friend
in the other room.  The first coupple of times I zapped the pipe, I was
lucky that the terminal that contacted the pipe first happened to be the
same terminal as the shield on the coaxial cable.  The shield happened to be
partially exposed on the end that connected to the zapper ... pants pockets
are not thick enough to stop 1200V!  But then the other terminal made
contact first!  YIPE!!!  I jumped halfway across the room and cussed like
the devil!  My friend laughed his a** off!


---
Another good story from roughly the same time (about the 7th grade) was when
a friend of mine gave me a bag of assorted firecrackers.  Up until this time
I had never encountered a cherry bomb and the only things I knew of that
came in little spherical packages were smoke bombs.  So the first one I lit
I just set on the ground and stepped back perhaps 2 or 3 feet.  I was
wondering why my friend was running off so fast for a smoke bomb.  Boy was I
surprised!!!  Them damn things sting when you're wearing shorts!


---
Then there's the ultimate in stupidity -- when I was in 4th grade I once got
a bunch of free plastic spoke decorations with a box of cereal or a happy
meal or something.  I put them on the front wheel of my bike just for sh*ts
and grins.  Then, as I was riding down a long hill at significant speed, I
noticed a coupple of friends of mine a ways ahead and decided to get rid of
the dorky spoke decorations before they see me with them.  To remove the
spoke decorations I commenced to rubbing my foot up against the rapidly
spinning wheel.  It was working quite well -- the little plastic thingys
were flying everywhere.  Then the damndest thing happned!  Somehow my foot
managed to become wedged between the spokes and the fork!  (who would have
seen that comming?)  Then I had one of those "OH SH*T!" moments where time
was going really slow and the bike was becomming more and more vertical and
I was trying to jump off but couldn't because my foot was stuck!  Then the
pavement came up to greet me and my bike landed on top of me and we both
slid a ways resulting in a nice case of road-rash.  Luckilly I managed not
to break any bones.  My original objective of avoiding embarasement was,
well... not terribly successful (to put it mildly).

2000\04\26@210219 by Plunkett, Dennis

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> -----Original Message-----
> From: Ken Webster [SMTP:EraseMEKenspam_OUTspamTakeThisOuTWEBSTER.ORG]
> Sent: Thursday, 27 April 2000 10:08
> To:   PICLISTspamspam_OUTMITVMA.MIT.EDU
> Subject:      Re: [OT] Re: Fire in the Hole!!!
>
> James Newton wrote:
> >Some day I'll have to tell you my ejection seat story.
>
>
       Is that not an extraction seat? (A rye grin, while thinking of
Grummond eng)

       Dennis

2000\04\26@230332 by Brian Kraut

picon face
I did my demonstration of a Tesla coil discharging into a metal rod in my hand
with a flourescent buld in the other hand once for a high school and didn't
realize that the floor was cement under the tile.  Talk about a hotfoot, even
with rubber soles.  Future demonstrations were done while standing on a plastic
milk crate.

I'll stop now.  Yes I do have a million of them, no I did not have a death wish
when I was younger.

Ken Webster wrote:

{Quote hidden}

2000\04\26@231356 by Sean Breheny

face picon face
Why should cement be conductive? Because it holds water well?

Sean

At 11:06 PM 4/26/00 -0400, you wrote:
>I did my demonstration of a Tesla coil discharging into a metal rod in my
hand
>with a flourescent buld in the other hand once for a high school and didn't
>realize that the floor was cement under the tile.  Talk about a hotfoot, even

|
| Sean Breheny
| Amateur Radio Callsign: KA3YXM
| Electrical Engineering Student
\--------------=----------------
Save lives, please look at http://www.all.org
Personal page: http://www.people.cornell.edu/pages/shb7
@spam@shb7KILLspamspamcornell.edu ICQ #: 3329174

2000\04\26@234117 by Wagner Lipnharski

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Sean Breheny wrote:
>
> Why should cement be conductive? Because it holds water well?
>
> Sean
>
> At 11:06 PM 4/26/00 -0400, you wrote:
> >I did my demonstration of a Tesla coil discharging into a metal rod in my
> hand
> >with a flourescent buld in the other hand once for a high school and didn't
> >realize that the floor was cement under the tile.  Talk about a hotfoot, even

I believe the silica existent at the sand attracts water, even from the
air, so it should be also one of the reasons why cement is always colder
than air and somehow a thermal conductor.
Wagner.

2000\04\27@004139 by Joe Colquitt

face picon face
> From: Brian Kraut
>
> I did my demonstration of a Tesla coil discharging into a metal rod in my
> hand

My physics teacher was demonstrating spark generation using some very big
army surplus HV caps. One of his examples was to show how the spark is
longer in a flame.

Tip : Don't hold a bunsen burner spewing out ionised gas between two HV
terminals just itching to discharge into something

Clue : Plenty of ouch current can get to the metal down the flame faster
than you can act on a "let go" message up your arm

2000\04\27@011831 by Plunkett, Dennis

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27/4/2000

Cement is not conductive, but concrete is!


Dennis



{Quote hidden}

2000\04\27@022130 by Russell McMahon

picon face
I've done this with several loose AA NiCd cells and a suitable mix of coins
and keys. I woul;dn't have thought it possible but ...

RM




>Those sound fun but try putting a 6-cell nicad in your pocket and having
>your key ring short it. I was out of my pants faster than anything and
>everybody around was having a great time laughing at me. The pants have a
>hole burned in the pocket and I have a scar to remind me.
>
>Bill

2000\04\27@072524 by Andrew Kunz

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face
Thanks for the reminder, Bill.

If you are traveling on a plane, PLEASE don't put rechargeable cells in your
checked luggage.  Keep them with you as carry-on, even though they are usually
heavy and a nuisance to carry.  It's a lot easier to extinguish a fire in the
cabin than it is in the cargo bay.

Remember ValuJet.

Andy








Bill Pierce <spamBeGoneamberscreamsspamBeGonespamHOTMAIL.COM> on 04/26/2000 05:29:23 PM

Please respond to pic microcontroller discussion list <TakeThisOuTPICLISTEraseMEspamspam_OUTMITVMA.MIT.EDU>








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cc:      (bcc: Andrew Kunz/TDI_NOTES)



Subject: [OT] Re: Fire in the Hole!!!








Those sound fun but try putting a 6-cell nicad in your pocket and having
your key ring short it. I was out of my pants faster than anything and
everybody around was having a great time laughing at me. The pants have a
hole burned in the pocket and I have a scar to remind me.

Bill


{Quote hidden}

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2000\04\27@113703 by jamesnewton

face picon face
Ejection seats in the S3 are not deactivated by WOW (Weight On Wheels: a
switch in the landing gear that shuts off systems that really shouldn't be
used while the bird is on deck, like the Radar or RadAlt). They might be
needed while the aircraft is rolling across a carrier deck. The safety is a
"head knocker" which moves into the position that would be occupied by the
pilots head when sitting in the seat. This is so that the pilot will for
damn sure enable the seat when sitting in the aircraft (Navy pilots tend to
be.... well that is another thread <EVIL GRIN>) When the aircraft lands and
the pilots leave, there is a long list of people who are supposed too make
sure those safety levers are down to prevent the seat from being
accidentally activated. They have two activation handles, one over the
pilots head and one between the legs. They are rocket powered and produce
about 10g's. They are built to work even when the aircraft has been damaged
and have been known to rip free of mangled tracks, crash through solid
steel, and sometimes the ejectee even survives the ride (not kidding)
usually permanently disabled by back injury. Enough background.

The "old timers" are always spouting off with little admonitions to younger
guys to do thing a certain way. Sometimes they come with a story about why
you should or what happened to some other guy. Most of the time, its just
"don't do this" or "do it this way". After a while (as the new guy) you get
sort of tired of hearing this. After the 1500th "don't put tools in your
pockets" I stopped listening. I needed a screw driver and was going to
wiggle up the tight space between the entry hatch (just below and in front
of the rear passenger side ejection seat) and the rear passenger side
station to get at the console while other work was going on in the
passageway. I stuck the driver in my front pocket, reached up and grabbed
the side of the seat and the console and started pulling myself up. I felt
something tug at my pocket, looked down to see the screwdriver nicely hooked
on the ejection seat activation handle and then (after sliding back down a
bit) looked up to see the head knocker pleasantly retracted thereby enabling
the seat. I had pulled the activation handle out about half way so it was
within fractions of an inch from firing that seat (and about half of me)
through the canopy and into the roof of the hanger.

After I secured the seat and stopped shaking, I went back into the shop and
ask my supers to review with me all the little do's and don'ts they had been
telling me.

Kids, there is just one moral here... the guy who is telling you how to do
it... is still alive... think about that before you wonder why he is telling
you something.

When I got new people into my shop (later in my hitch) who didn't seem to be
listening, I used to say that...

---
James Newton (PICList Admin #3)
RemoveMEjamesnewtonspam_OUTspamKILLspampiclist.com 1-619-652-0593
PIC/PICList FAQ: http://www.piclist.com or .org

-----Original Message-----
From: pic microcontroller discussion list
[RemoveMEPICLISTTakeThisOuTspamspamMITVMA.MIT.EDU]On Behalf Of Ken Webster
Sent: Wednesday, April 26, 2000 17:08
To: EraseMEPICLISTspamspamspamBeGoneMITVMA.MIT.EDU
Subject: Re: [OT] Re: Fire in the Hole!!!
Importance: Low


James Newton wrote:
>Some day I'll have to tell you my ejection seat story.


Eh?  This sounds good.  Please tell.

2000\04\27@212900 by Wagner Lipnharski

flavicon
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Oh yes, you are correct. sometimes we use to say "cement" refering to a
"concreted" floor or something.
"Plunkett, Dennis" wrote:
> 27/4/2000
> Cement is not conductive, but concrete is!
> Dennis

2000\04\27@214524 by Wagner Lipnharski

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Oh my, I just thought something nasty could happened last week. I went
to Houston to demonstrate a prototype... the same I put fire on my desk
days ago (shame)..., took it with me, since I was carrying just a hand
bag with clothes and survivel for a couple of days.  Taking the flight
back to Orlando, the customer gave me some samples and other stuff, so
my hand bag got a little bit bigger, but perfectly fit to take onboard.
The flight was really crowded for the stop at New Orleans (well, I can
understand), so they were filtering hand bags at the airplane door to
check it in to the cargo bay, and they took mine too. I thought for a
moment, nothing breakable, just a notebook inside but protected...
prototype is on the top of the hand bag, easy, let it go.  Arrived at
Orlando with the prototype front panel broke (plastic case), pressed
deep into the electronics... the power-on switch was lose with terminals
less than 1/8" from touching the electronics, but for a strike of luck
the same NiCad pack didn't short circuit. There was a (flammable) nice
after-shave lotion plastic bottle near the prototype. Can you imagine
what could happens at the cargo bay?  I really need to take extra care
with NiCads...  And airport security sniff all our luggage for
explosives... perhaps they should include NiCad chemical signature at
the tracer machine...

Andrew Kunz wrote:
{Quote hidden}

2000\04\27@232620 by Dale Botkin

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Not just NiCD, Wagner.  Buddy of mine got on a flight carrying his usual
assortment of geek toys and one of those nifty little 12V power packs,
basically a 12V gel cell with some terminals in a little nylon bag.
Being a ham, of course, his had been modified to add some connections for
some of his geek toys.  One of said connections, if I recall correctly,
was a pair of alligator clips.  So the plane's taxiing, he bumps the bag,
the clips short...  and the whole plane suddenly smells like burning
insulation. Wonderful air circulation in those aircraft, my friend was
very lucky they never did figure out where that odor came from!  Wonder
how many thousands of dollars in downtime and inspections that cost the
airline...

Tee hee...  I'd never mention his call sign, of course (and no, it's not
mine!)

Dale

On Thu, 27 Apr 2000, Wagner Lipnharski wrote:

{Quote hidden}

---
The most exciting phrase to hear in science, the one that heralds new
discoveries, is not "Eureka!" (I found it!) but "That's funny ..."
               -- Isaac Asimov

2000\04\27@233513 by Brian Kraut

picon face
I don't know exactly why, but it is.

Sean Breheny wrote:

{Quote hidden}


'[OT] Re: Fire in the Hole!!!'
2000\05\01@152041 by James Paul
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All,

From my point of view, I don't give a whit about sex, race, creed,
whatever, as long as the programmer can do what they say they can do
and get the job done when they say they can get it done, within the
constraints put forth and agreed upon beforehand.  Seem to me that's
the bottom line.

                                             Regards,

                                                Jim



On Mon, 01 May 2000, David VanHorn wrote:

{Quote hidden}

jimSTOPspamspamspam_OUTjpes.com

2000\05\01@155348 by David VanHorn

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-----BEGIN PGP SIGNED MESSAGE-----
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At 12:19 PM 5/1/00 -0700, James Paul wrote:
> All,
>
> From my point of view, I don't give a whit about sex, race, creed,
> whatever, as long as the programmer can do what they say they can do
> and get the job done when they say they can get it done, within the
> constraints put forth and agreed upon beforehand.  Seem to me that's
> the bottom line.

Me too, I've just noticed that this usually happens with the women, less so
with the men.
The processors are the ultimate judge, and you KNOW they don't care. :)

- --
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http://www.spamwhack.com  A pre-emptive strike against spam!

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2000\05\01@161035 by David VanHorn

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My worst experience as an engineer, was when I was on another factory trip
to Kaohsiung Taiwan.
As usual, I stayed at the Ambassador, which is a great hotel.

One evening I was sort of drifting in and out of sleep, and I remember
thinking that people really shouldn't be cooking in their rooms. Then I
remember thinking "what a bad cigar".  Some time later I realized that
people in luxury hotels DONT cook, and there weren't any cigars in my room
either.  The real clue was when I rolled over and turned on the light. It
was still dark.  I called the desk and asked if there was a problem, and
the operator said "yes" in a paniced voice, and hung up.

I got dressed fast, and grabbed the prototypes and docs I was carrying for
our new product, my passport and plane tickets, and checked the door.
Believe me, fire hoses in the hallway are not something you want to see in
your peep-viewer.

I went for the stairs, and climbed down with a really interesting slice of
humanity. This hotel was very popular with the Japaneese as a honeymoon
destination, and I could easily tell that some of my fellow guests were a
bit more rushed getting out than I was. :)

When I got to the bottom, I called my contact, and asked him if he had a
spare room.

As it turned out, the floor below me was on fire, and they thought they had
evacuated everyone from my floor.  I was in a room whose door was in an odd
corner in the floorplan, and apparently they got everyone but me out.

The funny part was that there was never one word in the paper or the TV
news about the biggest hotel in town loosing three floors in a fire, and
when I went back to the hotel (different floor) they insisted that the
elevators were out of service "for maintainance"... The seared and buckled
doors told a different story, and then there's that wonderful smell.

Life can be interesting in a military dictatorship. :-)

Then there was the time that the China Air pilot two wheeled our 747 around
a turn at the Hong Kong airport..
Apparently he was determined to take the FIRST available turnoff.


- --
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http://www.spamwhack.com  A pre-emptive strike against spam!

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2000\05\01@162326 by Dan Michaels

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Dave Van Horn wrote:
....
>Then there was the time that the China Air pilot two wheeled our 747 around
>a turn at the Hong Kong airport..
>Apparently he was determined to take the FIRST available turnoff.
>

You shouldn't really start with the airline stuff - you'll
get a million responses here..... but the pilot may have had the
following problem:

..... reminds me of the time we landed in Charlotte at nite, and
as we were braking, I noticed another plane had just touched down
on a runway 90 degrees to us. Boy did our pilot ever hit the brakes
hard. And seems I was the only one who noticed the other plane - and
of course, the stewardess didn't see a thing. But I thanked the pilot
anyway.

2000\05\02@144349 by Jeff Frohwein

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When I was about eight years old I was playing with a string of
Christmas lights. I plugged it in and it appeared to work just
fine. I did notice that the end of the cord had a plug on it
(where you would plug in another string of lights) and this was
strange to me at the time. My understanding of Christmas lights
at the time was that all of the lights were hooked in series so
there should be no breaks in the circuit "anywhere". (Not
realizing that these were modern lights that all were 120v and
were hooked in parallel.)

Well I proceeded to go into totally clueless mode and cut the
connector off the end of this cord and strip the wires so that
I could connect them together. So that the lights would be even
brighter! (Or so I thought... or something..) Doing all this while
the power was still on! Next thing I know I see these sparks
and the lights go off. At that point I was scared stiff because
I couldn't see anything and I was in my hide-out under the stairs
of our house and the only way out was to slide past all of these
wires that I had just stripped. I learned how to reset circuit
breakers that day... after I changed my pants.... ;)


I remember I was visiting my granddad's place one time and I
was watching as he was doing house repairs. This is when I saw
him unscrew a light bulb and put two fingers into the socket.
I was about 10 at that time and after my own previous near disaster
experiences I thought he had totally "lost his marbles." I
later mentioned this to my dad and he said, "Oh... He's been
doing that for years! Don't let that surprise you." Hmmmm...
I'm genetically tied to them??.... Hmmm....


I figure the following is probably an interesting story so
I thought I'd share it. Mainly because it's so unusual that
you probably couldn't get away with it in many jobs.
In the early 60's my dad was working for the University of Iowa
in the US (under Dr. Van Allen, the radiation belt discoverer.)
At the time he was project manager over one of the early Injun(?)
satellites that was being put in space for measurements.
Anyway, his job was to wire up all of the different out-sourced
modules of this satellite and make the thing work, ultimately.
Rather than to draw up a pile of wiring diagrams he requested
a section (unused I would assume) of the University to be blocked
off and he unrolled a ~100 foot long, 3 foot wide roll of paper
and proceeded to draw the whole wiring diagram for the module
interconnections on one large sheet of paper.
When he got done he rolled up the paper and then handed this
off to the guys that were actually responsible for wiring the
thing and he said he got some strange facial expressions in
return. (Go figure!)


He mentioned to me another story that occurred to him in one of
his very early part-time jobs that I figure is the best story
he ever told me so it's hard not to share it.

During part-time work as a park assistant, part of his job was
to help out tourists, etc. Well he got this call that a truck
load of tourists were stuck in some mud and needed help getting
out. My dad was using a jeep at the time so he figured he'd
see what he could do. When he got there he hooked up a chain
and found that even though he had 4-wheel drive his tires were
spinning, as well, trying to help them out of the mud. Pretty
soon he was in up to his axles and couldn't get out himself.

Since that was proving useless he started walking back to get
more help when a bus was passing by. He flagged down the bus
and asked if he could help in the cause. The guy agreed and
he drove to where the other two vehicles were stuck. Dad had
a winch on the front of the jeep that had a cord that wasn't
long enough to connect to any trees but was long enough to
connect to the rear bumper of the bus as it stayed on dry
ground. So the bus started pulling the jeep which was pulling
the stuck truck. Pretty soon the chains started getting very
tight but the truck still was still unwilling to budge. About
this time the jeep started rising up in the air, suspended
above ground, due to the the tension of the chains. At this
point he had a "real" problem because the jeep was top heavy
and slowly started turning upside down. The bus driver looks
back and notices that the jeep is completely upside down so
he lets of the gas and shuts down the bus. This of course has
the effect of setting the jeep on the ground in it's inverted
position. Sometime during this whole timeline my dad decides
it's time to bail out of the jeep so he ends up watching
some of this on  the sidelines.

Now no one had a clue WHAT to do next... Before long the bus
driver mentions that he needs to leave because he is getting
behind schedule. So they unhook the chains to the bus and the
bus driver drives away. At this point you have an upside down
jeep with a tight chain that appears to be attempting to pull
a truck.

I asked my dad about it, "What did your boss say??" He said
he didn't know, he quit his job then and there on the spot.
I still keep trying to picture the expression on his boss'
face when he saw this whole scene. I know what I probably
would have said, "What in the h@|| ?!?"

Jeff

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