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'[OT] INVERT THE WAVE'
2000\04\11@182900 by paulb

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Look in the archives.  At least a year back.  Though way, way [OT],
having no conceivable connection to PICs, rather DSPs, I seem to recall
this was exhaustively discussed complete with web references some time
ago.
--
 Cheers,
       Paul B.

2000\04\12@081449 by paulb

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Jinx wrote:

> The same technique used to relieve tinnitus.  The patient is fed white
> noise, which they soon become used to and ignore. As the volume of the
> white noise is gradually reduced over a period of time, it "takes" the
> tinnitus with it as the patient's auditory system adjusts

 One version of it.  The one I seem to recall is that they are actually
fed "pink" (possibly "ochre" or "lime" really) noise matched to the
tinnitus so that it provokes the brain to ignore that frequency (notch).

 Tinnitus (which I have due to a diving _faux pas_) is not necessarily
a pure tone - if one (or a few adjacent) nerve cells are damaged and
fire spontaneously (though apparently the same effect happens if they
are damaged and therefore do *not* fire at all), they do not directly
map to frequency, pure tone mapping requires post-processing contrast
enhancement further on in.  Thus "pink" noise counter-stimulus is more
appropriate than a pure tone.

 Also, tinnitus usually self-cancels (mine does, unless you remind me
of it), implying that severe persistent tinnitus requiring masking
devices is actually a breakdown in the brain, not the ear. Thus treated
with anti-epileptic, anti-psychotic or antidepressant medication.

 Speaking from personal observation, I believe everybody knows what
tinnitus is because everyone gets it.  Can anyone tell me they never
have experienced a sudden "airy" whistle in their hearing which they
knew was spurious, but which faded away in a minute or so and was
forgotten.  This could signal the random, spontaneous demise of a
neurone somewhere in the system, just like the sharp spurious pain in a
limb or other body part and similar in other senses.  Alternatively, it
may not be actual neurone death, but a localised, trivial, epileptiform
phenomenon.
--
 Cheers,
       Paul B.

2000\04\12@083531 by Michael Rigby-Jones

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<P><FONT SIZE=2 FACE="Arial">&nbsp; Also, tinnitus usually self-cancels (mine does, unless you remind me</FONT>
<BR><FONT SIZE=2 FACE="Arial">of it), implying that severe persistent tinnitus requiring masking</FONT>
<BR><FONT SIZE=2 FACE="Arial">devices is actually a breakdown in the brain, not the ear. Thus treated</FONT>
<BR><FONT SIZE=2 FACE="Arial">with anti-epileptic, anti-psychotic or antidepressant medication.</FONT>
</P>

<P><FONT SIZE=2 FACE="Arial">&nbsp; Speaking from personal observation, I believe everybody knows what</FONT>
<BR><FONT SIZE=2 FACE="Arial">tinnitus is because everyone gets it.&nbsp; Can anyone tell me they never</FONT>
<BR><FONT SIZE=2 FACE="Arial">have experienced a sudden &quot;airy&quot; whistle in their hearing which they</FONT>
<BR><FONT SIZE=2 FACE="Arial">knew was spurious, but which faded away in a minute or so and was</FONT>
<BR><FONT SIZE=2 FACE="Arial">forgotten.&nbsp; This could signal the random, spontaneous demise of a</FONT>
<BR><FONT SIZE=2 FACE="Arial">neurone somewhere in the system, just like the sharp spurious pain in a</FONT>
<BR><FONT SIZE=2 FACE="Arial">limb or other body part and similar in other senses.&nbsp; Alternatively, it</FONT>
<BR><FONT SIZE=2 FACE="Arial">may not be actual neurone death, but a localised, trivial, epileptiform</FONT>
<BR><FONT SIZE=2 FACE="Arial">phenomenon.</FONT>
<BR><FONT SIZE=2 FACE="Arial">--</FONT>
<BR><FONT SIZE=2 FACE="Arial">&nbsp; Cheers,</FONT>
<BR><FONT SIZE=2 FACE="Arial">&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp; Paul B.</FONT>
</P>
</UL>
<P><FONT COLOR="#0000FF" SIZE=2 FACE="Arial">I have certainly had this several times in my life.&nbsp; From either clubs with ridiculously high sound pressure levels, which made my ears ring for days after, or from stupidly using power tools with no protection.&nbsp; I'm sure that I've read that any tinitus resulting from exposure to loud noise was a sure sign that your hearing had been irreversably damaged.&nbsp; However, I had to take a hearing test a few years back go get a track saftey certificate to allow me to work near railway tracks.&nbsp; The doctor who performed this said my hearing was almost perfect and much better than normal for my age.&nbsp; As the yanks say, go figure.</FONT></P>

<P><FONT COLOR="#0000FF" SIZE=2 FACE="Arial">Mike</FONT>
</P>

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2000\04\12@083535 by David VanHorn

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>  Tinnitus (which I have due to a diving _faux pas_) is not necessarily
>a pure tone - if one (or a few adjacent) nerve cells are damaged and
>fire spontaneously (though apparently the same effect happens if they
>are damaged and therefore do *not* fire at all), they do not directly
>map to frequency, pure tone mapping requires post-processing contrast
>enhancement further on in.  Thus "pink" noise counter-stimulus is more
>appropriate than a pure tone.

I've just discovered that I've got tinnitus. :(
What I hear, 24 hours a day, is a tone-ish noise (noise, that sounds pretty
centered around a tone, but it's very hard to pick out a frequency)
It's roughly as loud as my room airconditioner 10' away.
I don't know what I could have done to piss off my ears, I've never been
much of a loud music junkie, never had any extreme pressure events...
Shooting, with ear protection, maybe twice a year (I AM an american after all)

I also have what my audiologist calls a "moderate" notch of 60dB (!) at
about 3kHz
Since when is a 1,000,000 / 1 loss "moderate" ?
I bet if I applied that loss to her salary, she'd think it was pretty
significant.

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2000\04\12@084822 by paulb

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Michael Rigby-Jones wrote:

> I'm sure that I've read that any tinitus resulting from exposure to
> loud noise was a sure sign that your hearing had been irreversably
> damaged.  However, I had to take a hearing test a few years back go
> get a track saftey certificate to allow me to work near railway
> tracks.  The doctor who performed this said my hearing was almost
> perfect and much better than normal for my age.

1}  Like the 99-year-old who smoked all his life.  How much longer
could he have lived if he didn't smoke?  It's called "spread of
characteristics".

2}  There's loud and there's loud.  A muscle called the stapedius pre-
tensions your eardrum against persistent loud noise.  You can contract
this voluntarily (do you recall doing that?) as well as automatically.
And you move away if the noise really is too loud.  Unexpected
explosions however (track warning detonators?) bypass this.

3}  There's tinnitus and there's tinnitus.  There's the one you just
notice after the rock concert, and the one that lasts long after the
gunshot.
--
 Cheers,
       Paul B.

2000\04\12@085433 by paulb

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David VanHorn wrote:

> What I hear, 24 hours a day, is a tone-ish noise (noise, that sounds
> pretty centered around a tone, but it's very hard to pick out a
> frequency)

 That's the definition.

> Shooting, with ear protection, maybe twice a year (I AM an american
> after all)

 Hard to say...

> I also have what my audiologist calls a "moderate" notch of 60dB (!)
> at about 3kHz

 Notch eh?  I have a 60+dB *step* at 3 kHz in my right ear.  Not a
notch, it's a LPF.
--
 Cheers,
       Paul B.

2000\04\12@090249 by David VanHorn

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>  Notch eh?  I have a 60+dB *step* at 3 kHz in my right ear.  Not a
>notch, it's a LPF.

If we hook our heads in series, can we make a state-variable filter?
This may explain why I've had tremendous trouble learning morse code,
though it's a moot point in about 72 hours.

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2000\04\12@205835 by Dale Botkin

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On Wed, 12 Apr 2000, Paul B. Webster VK2BZC wrote:

>   Speaking from personal observation, I believe everybody knows what
> tinnitus is because everyone gets it.  Can anyone tell me they never
> have experienced a sudden "airy" whistle in their hearing which they
8< snip...

Dammit, Paul, now *MY* ears are ringing.  Too much work trying to pull QRP
cw out of DC receiver noise, probably.

Dale (n0xas)
---
The most exciting phrase to hear in science, the one that heralds new
discoveries, is not "Eureka!" (I found it!) but "That's funny ..."
               -- Isaac Asimov

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