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'[OT] American Inventor'
2006\03\17@124702 by James Humes

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Hi,

    Did anyone happen to catch "American Inventor" on ABC yesterday?  It's
an interesting concept a lot like American Idol except for product
development.  What I'm wondering is, if you did catch it, does anyone
remember the fourteen year old kid's last name?  He invented an air
conditioner for dogs in parked cars that was pretty clever but the judges
kind of shot him down.  I'd like to locate him and offer some "mentoring"
since I'm near by with all the tools he'd need to make a second prototype
really impressive.

      One of the judges who supposedly got his start at a young age said
"Im going to say to you what I would have wanted to hear at your age:
No."   This was patently ignorant since I think any young brain should be
encouraged and given access to the info they need.  I was profoundly
influenced by a few adults who steered me to the right info and cringed to
see the opposite happen to this kid.

James

2006\03\17@125345 by Michael Rigby-Jones

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{Quote hidden}

I didn't see that but I totaly agree with your sentiments.  No young person WANTS to be told no, it's a crushing blow when you have put a lot of time and enthusiasm into something.

Regards

Mike

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2006\03\17@130317 by M. Adam Davis

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I don't recall his last name either.  I can think of a dozen reasons
why this invention wouldn't qualify for the show (it's already out
there, for one thing).

The quote, however, is something more like, "I'm going to treat you
the way I wanted to be treated when I was your age..." and seems to
indicate that he would have liked to say yes to the kid, but wanted to
treat him as an adult and tell him the truth instead of giving him
false hopes and expectations.

I liked that this judge went out afterwords and had a few more words
with the kid and his mother after the presentation.

It seems to be an interesting show.  Like all "reality TV" they seek
out and use people with very strong personalities, or who are very
presentable.

I certainly don't blame them - I got a kick out of the "space beetles"
guy, as well as the "smoking gun" etc.  But I suspect that a lot of
interesting inventions will never get on the show simply because the
inventor is too quiet.

I wish they told us more what the format of the remainder of the
season is going to be:  How many more "first round" judging sessions
there are, what the next rounds will consist of, etc, but I suspect
that they are making a lot of this up as they go since they don't know
what to expect from the beginning.

-Adam

On 3/17/06, James Humes <james.humesspamKILLspamgmail.com> wrote:
{Quote hidden}

> -

2006\03\17@133507 by Padu

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Dammit

This is one of the few tv programs that I wanted to see, but I was in my
workshop burning my nose with the soldering iron.

Will it reprise? (I mean, the premiere) Can I watch it online somewhere?

Cheers

Padu

{Original Message removed}

2006\03\17@142551 by Rolf

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I saw that particular segment.

I did not catch the kid's name... but as for mentoring on that
particular project of his, I have seen very similar devices before. I
though the reasons given for his rejection did not make sense, and the
"prior art" reason did, even though they obviously did not know the
device was produced already.

http://www.brucemedical.com/ik1605.html

Rolf

James Humes wrote:
{Quote hidden}

2006\03\17@151648 by Don Taylor

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From: "M. Adam Davis" <.....stienmanKILLspamspam.....gmail.com>
> It seems to be an interesting show.  Like all "reality TV" they seek
> out and use people with very strong personalities, or who are very
> presentable.

It is the "Survivor syndrome", they watched American Idol, saw that
a judge was insulting, so they multiplied that by six and the judges
were picked or told to be REALLY insulting, they saw the contestents
were intense so they specifically selected or told contestents to be
really intense.  And they picked the most "mother gut ripper" items
for the opening episode.  "JunkYard Wars" was changed to follow this
format more after the producers watches other shows.

> I certainly don't blame them - I got a kick out of the "space beetles"
> guy, as well as the "smoking gun" etc.  But I suspect that a lot of
> interesting inventions will never get on the show simply because the
> inventor is too quiet.

I searched the web to try to find a description of all the inventions
that have already been judged non acceptable, but didn't find this.

> I wish they told us more what the format of the remainder of the
> season is going to be:  How many more "first round" judging sessions
> there are, what the next rounds will consist of, etc, but I suspect
> that they are making a lot of this up as they go since they don't know
> what to expect from the beginning.

With the opening ideas being the invention of

   "a stick", but it did have mace and an a screaming audio source,
   to fend off attacks by lions and tigers and bears, oh my,
and
   "a poncho" so you can pee while standing in a crowd of strangers

I can't imagine how they are going to top this with each new episode.

Geeze, I think I could have come up with something less likely to be
dismissed as implausible in the first two minutes.

How about a little gadget that restores security/confidence in
email/web pages/online transactions?

Naaa, that couldn't compete with a poncho to pee inside of.

2006\03\17@152001 by VULCAN20

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First off  my thoughts of the show was 90% acting and 10% reality.  They
only give an inventor 2 minutes to present the next greatest invention
in the world.  I thought that they should never have wasted the viewers
time with some of them.

There was some thing more to the kids invention then a ventilator fan,
but he or the judges did not go into that.  It would have to be some
kind of refrigerated unit and the size of container he had it in would
not provide the necessary cooling to do the job.

Lastly I love dogs.  He stated they loved their dog and took him every
where   That means you do not leave him in a car in Hot weather.  Some
states have laws that put people in jail for that.

I apologize for the soap box speech.

One more thing:  How many people heard about this thing when there was
enough time to enter the competition???


Rolf wrote:

{Quote hidden}

2006\03\17@152434 by James Humes

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Hi everyone,

    Thanks for responding.  Padu, unfortunately I could not find a replay
time direct on ABC but you might still dig around.

    Reading the responses I guess I did hear the one judge differently than
he spoke, but regardless I felt like the way they let the kid go (including
the judge coming up to him after the judgement) left a lot to be desired as
far as constructive and inspiring advice about how a kid at his age could
proceed from there.  I guess maybe I shouldn't be so concerned, but since
I'm right next to Denver with a ton of equipment I thought I might be able
to help him realize some of his projects by just giving him access to tools
and information.

    I remember his name started with W...   there are a few too many W's in
the Denver phone book to just start dialing:)  Wahjl maybe, or Wahl.  I
thought it was worth a shot, so if anyone remembers or catches a rerunplease
post it.  Thanks!

James

On 3/17/06, Rolf <EraseMElearrspam_OUTspamTakeThisOuTrogers.com> wrote:
{Quote hidden}

2006\03\17@162834 by Herbert Graf

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On Fri, 2006-03-17 at 12:16 -0800, Don Taylor wrote:
> From: "M. Adam Davis" <stienmanspamspam_OUTgmail.com>
> > It seems to be an interesting show.  Like all "reality TV" they seek
> > out and use people with very strong personalities, or who are very
> > presentable.
>
> It is the "Survivor syndrome", they watched American Idol, saw that
> a judge was insulting, so they multiplied that by six and the judges
> were picked or told to be REALLY insulting, they saw the contestents
> were intense so they specifically selected or told contestents to be
> really intense.  And they picked the most "mother gut ripper" items
> for the opening episode.  "JunkYard Wars" was changed to follow this
> format more after the producers watches other shows.

True, and that's what IMHO killed Scrapheap Challenge (aka. Junkyard
Wars).

I loved Scrapheap, but once they started producing it in the states my
interested waned. It seemed every episode starting turning into a "find
a V8, stick it into something with wheels, go as fast as you can" type
of challenge. Fine the first time you see it. Crappy the 40th time
you've seen it.

The British produced episodes had some REALLY interesting challenges,
one of my favourite being "Wind powered coffee grinding machines"...

TTYL

-----------------------------
Herbert's PIC Stuff:
http://repatch.dyndns.org:8383/pic_stuff/

2006\03\17@173848 by Jinx

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> The British produced episodes had some REALLY interesting
> challenges, one of my favourite being "Wind powered coffee
> grinding machines"...

That's a pretty old one Herbert, and yes, on average Scrapheap
Challenge was probably a little better back then. They can still
find some interesting challenges though

One program I just can't watch is Monster Garage. Nasty, noisy
people. That seems to be the American Way - badder and uglier
for those with short attention spans. Jesse James and Sandra
Bullock ? Can't figure that one out - but they deserve each other

American Inventor sounds like another completely missable show.
Someone ought to sue over the use of "reality"

> One of the judges who supposedly got his start at a young age
> said "Im going to say to you what I would have wanted to hear
> at your age: No."

Last year I was involved with a school project. Athough the pupils
thought it was a "new product", it was far from that, but still worth
pursuing and I wouldn't have ever said "No". It all turned to custard
for other reasons but could have been a valuable lesson otherwise

I've been involved with the NZ Inventors Trust for many years, and
there are some people who need to be told "NO". They've had one
("brilliant" in their opinion) idea in their life, and will cling to it as a
one-day-I'm-gonna-make-it-big daydream. They need to drop it
and move on. Either realise the idea just isn't ever going to work or
"piss or get off the pot" - ie make it and fail instead of boring everyone
with it


2006\03\17@174713 by Jinx

face picon face
> the device was produced already.
>
> http://www.brucemedical.com/ik1605.html

Must be easily 5 years - sure it's longer - since I saw
a news item about a similar product on sale in NZ

You'd have to wonder what research is done for the program,
or why they'd ignore any similar products they find. Answer -
for the average ignorant viewer I guess it doesn't matter. They
just want drama / conflict / blood 'n' guts

More than once I've had someone ask me to investigate their
whizz-bang-killer idea and 5 minutes later I've got a Googleful
of existing patents and a glum-looking enquirer

2006\03\17@175746 by Herbert Graf

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On Sat, 2006-03-18 at 11:37 +1300, Jinx wrote:
> > The British produced episodes had some REALLY interesting
> > challenges, one of my favourite being "Wind powered coffee
> > grinding machines"...
>
> That's a pretty old one Herbert, and yes, on average Scrapheap
> Challenge was probably a little better back then. They can still
> find some interesting challenges though

Oh yes, perhaps the 2nd or 3rd season, not sure. Back in the good old
days when the show was still hosted by Cathy Rogers and Robert
Llewellyn.

> One program I just can't watch is Monster Garage. Nasty, noisy
> people. That seems to be the American Way - badder and uglier
> for those with short attention spans. Jesse James and Sandra
> Bullock ? Can't figure that one out - but they deserve each other

Agreed completely. The thing is though there ARE some good american
"reality" type shows. Mythbusters can be quite entertaining. The science
isn't always the best, but it sure can be funny.

One of my favourite "reality" shows is something called "Survivorman".
It's a Canadian production which means it likely isn't seen anywhere
else. Basically it's a guy who puts himself in a "survival" situation
with just a few items, and a ton of camera gear. The show is filmed
basically only by himself. For 7 days he throws himself into some of the
most insane situations.

In one episode he "emulated" what would happen if your snow mobile broke
down in the middle of the arctic! In another he emulated how to survive
after your plane crashes in northern Ontario in the late autumn.

The best part of the show is the situation is about as real as you can
get, and when he makes a mistake, you see it, and he admits to it!

Highly recommended if you ever catch it on TV.

TTYL

-----------------------------
Herbert's PIC Stuff:
http://repatch.dyndns.org:8383/pic_stuff/

2006\03\17@180124 by Danny Sauer

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Jinx wrote regarding 'Re: [OT] American Inventor' on Fri, Mar 17 at 16:40:
> > The British produced episodes had some REALLY interesting
> > challenges, one of my favourite being "Wind powered coffee
> > grinding machines"...
>
> That's a pretty old one Herbert, and yes, on average Scrapheap
> Challenge was probably a little better back then. They can still
> find some interesting challenges though

That's the one that was called "Junkyard Wars" over here in the USA,
right (sorry if I'm duplicating, I haven't read the whole thread)?
Amazing how they always had exactly the right stuff out in the
junkyard, isn't it? :)  It always bugged me that they put on this act
like the teams are searching a junkyard finding whatever they can,
rather than building something that was obviously planned out
previously.  I mean, it's a decent show with a decent concept, do they
*have* to throw in a lie just because it's on TV?

> One program I just can't watch is Monster Garage. Nasty, noisy
> people. That seems to be the American Way - badder and uglier
> for those with short attention spans.

I'm pretty sure it's been off the air for a while now, but when it was
on, it was often fairly interesting if you looked past the TV
"personas" which I'm sure were at least half-faked to generate bigger
public interest.  A few of the episodes where they went to a poor high
school and had the shop class build something, those were actually
nice community outreach types of things.

Then again, I've been home sick all week due to a nasty sinus
infection partially caused by too much welding without a respirator
(doh, won't be making *that* mistake again), and I think the only
thing funny about most british comedy is the people who call it
comedy. :)  So maybe that explains how I'd enjoy watching skilled
craftsmen at work.  Then again, *that* statement probably explains why
I stopped watching Monster Garage around the time "half pint" (or
whatever his name is) started showing up more often, apparently in an
effort to distract from the fact that they really weren't building
anything particularly interesting or using particularly impressive
craftsmanship anymore...

> Someone ought to sue over the use of "reality"

If only Microsoft had called their OS "Reality" instead of "Windows".
Maybe the successor to Vista - "Windows Reality"... :)

--Danny

2006\03\17@182128 by Jinx

face picon face

> That's the one that was called "Junkyard Wars" over here in the
> USA, right (sorry if I'm duplicating, I haven't read the whole thread)?
> Amazing how they always had exactly the right stuff out in the
> junkyard, isn't it? :)  It always bugged me that they put on this act
> like the teams are searching a junkyard finding whatever they can,
> rather than building something that was obviously planned out
> previously.  I mean, it's a decent show with a decent concept, do they
> *have* to throw in a lie just because it's on TV?

I've seen a lot more SC than JW (see, that's what I'm talking about -
why did they have to call it "Wars" ?)

Now and then you notice things definitely-not-scrap 2" square tube
steel. Maybe the items they find (working lawnmowers, pumps etc)
are actually scrap. They've just been assigned to that particular heap.
A written-off car for example is junk but it's got a working engine

There's obviously a chat with the experts before the show so that
both teams don't make the same obvious solution. But the outcome
is always uncertain because of the build quality. From that perspective
it's vaguely instructional from a QC POV

> > One program I just can't watch is Monster Garage

> Then again, I've been home sick all week due to a nasty sinus
> infection partially caused by too much welding without a respirator

In one of the very few MG I saw, some tough-guy hero (ie a total
loud-mouthed tosspot) arc-welded without a mask and got taken
away with burnt retinas. Then there are the ones who throw their
toys out of the pram (or tools at the wall) at the slightest provocation.
Too much senseless bashing of things in MG for my taste. But then
I don't see the point of Viva La Bam or Jackass either. My 17yo
nephew (outwardly a mild-mannered sort) loves them. Each to his
own I guess

2006\03\17@182358 by Alex Harford

face picon face
On 3/17/06, Herbert Graf <@spam@mailinglist2KILLspamspamfarcite.net> wrote:
>
> In another he emulated how to survive
> after your plane crashes in northern Ontario in the late autumn.
>
> The best part of the show is the situation is about as real as you can
> get, and when he makes a mistake, you see it, and he admits to it!

Oh, I saw that episode!  I never, EVER want to be that cold.

For the OP:

http://www.makezine.com/blog/archive/2006/03/american_inventor_live_blog_fu.html

Sadly they don't mention his name. :(

Alex

2006\03\17@182658 by Herbert Graf

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face
On Fri, 2006-03-17 at 17:01 -0600, Danny Sauer wrote:
> Jinx wrote regarding 'Re: [OT] American Inventor' on Fri, Mar 17 at 16:40:
> > > The British produced episodes had some REALLY interesting
> > > challenges, one of my favourite being "Wind powered coffee
> > > grinding machines"...
> >
> > That's a pretty old one Herbert, and yes, on average Scrapheap
> > Challenge was probably a little better back then. They can still
> > find some interesting challenges though
>
> That's the one that was called "Junkyard Wars" over here in the USA,
> right (sorry if I'm duplicating, I haven't read the whole thread)?
> Amazing how they always had exactly the right stuff out in the
> junkyard, isn't it? :)  It always bugged me that they put on this act
> like the teams are searching a junkyard finding whatever they can,
> rather than building something that was obviously planned out
> previously.  I mean, it's a decent show with a decent concept, do they
> *have* to throw in a lie just because it's on TV?

Actually, to nitpick, it was admitted numerous time that they "plant"
certain necessary items to complete the challenges. Yes, they didn't say
it every episode, but a regular watcher was well aware that certain hard
to find items where placed in the yard.

That said, the shows WAS run in a REAL scrapyard, and MOST of the stuff
the teams used WERE scrap.

You're not the first person to complain about the items being planted, I
personally never had much of a problem with it. After all, a steam
engine, or rocket engines isn't something I'd expect to find in a
scrapyard.

TTYL



-----------------------------
Herbert's PIC Stuff:
http://repatch.dyndns.org:8383/pic_stuff/

2006\03\17@193855 by William Chops Westfield

face picon face

On Mar 17, 2006, at 10:03 AM, M. Adam Davis wrote:

> It seems to be an interesting show.  Like all "reality TV" they seek
> out and use people with very strong personalities, or who are very
> presentable.
       :
> I wish they told us more what the format of the remainder of the
> season is going to be:  How many more "first round" judging sessions
> there are, what the next rounds will consist of, etc...

My wife and family watched "project runway", a "reality" show
based on fashion design.  They picked 16 unknown fashion designers,
and after the initial selection, issued successive challenges that
all the designers has to address.  Each session, they picked one
winner (receiving assorted minor rewards), and one (or two) loser
(eliminated from the show), till there was only one winner left
(major awards.)

Some of the challenges were pretty interesting.  Design an outfit
for Barbie (the doll.)  An outfit for a figure skater.  Something
made with items from a garden store.  Something made with "the
clothes you're wearing now."  We did get the impression that some
of the entrants lasted "past their time" due to their personality
making for a more interesting show, rather than actual skill.

Apparently fashion designers are a whimpy lot, and I didn't see
any of the cut-throat competitiveness I might have expected based
on advertisements for other "reality programming."  And it just
finished its second season, so I guess people liked it anyway.

An "inventor" show along those lines might work.  Although if they
had to actually make anything, I'd expect the "invention" aspect
to get buried by the "build it" aspect.  That happened occasionally
to the fashion designers as well (stuff falling apart on the runway),
but at least sewing and design are more intimately related than
invention and ALL the myriad skills needed to actually produce a
working model...  (of course, that IS where many inventions bog
down; when the inventor make a bad assumption about how easy or
hard a particular thing is to actually IMPLEMENT.)

BillW

2006\03\17@194031 by Danny Sauer

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face
Herbert wrote regarding 'Re: [OT] American Inventor' on Fri, Mar 17 at 17:35:
> On Fri, 2006-03-17 at 17:01 -0600, Danny Sauer wrote:
> > It always bugged me that they put on this act like the teams are
> > searching a junkyard finding whatever they can, rather than
> > building something that was obviously planned out previously.  I
> > mean, it's a decent show with a decent concept, do they *have* to
> > throw in a lie just because it's on TV?
>
> Actually, to nitpick, it was admitted numerous time that they
> "plant" certain necessary items to complete the challenges. Yes,
> they didn't say it every episode, but a regular watcher was well
> aware that certain hard to find items where placed in the yard.
>
> That said, the shows WAS run in a REAL scrapyard, and MOST of the
> stuff the teams used WERE scrap.
>
> You're not the first person to complain about the items being
> planted, I personally never had much of a problem with it. After
> all, a steam engine, or rocket engines isn't something I'd expect to
> find in a scrapyard.

Just to return the nitpick... :)  I've seen quite a few episodes of
both British and USA origin, and have never seen them come right out
and say it.  But fine, some *real* geeks have heard the encoded
confession in a background conversation on episodes 47 and 322 - why
continue pretending in the other eleventy billion episodes?  Geez, they
give them a comfy seat or misc. safety gear - can't those be planted
too?  I want to be surprised as to whether or not Joey Diesel Mechanic
will still have an intact skull after the challenge!  Make him *find*
a safe helmet in the junkyard!

Anyway, I'm not complaining about the planting itself - it's almost
required for good TV.  Along with the time limit extensions and other
rule-bending.  But I still find the pretending thing somewhat
insulting.  Not that the rest of the shows on TV aren't somehow
insulting on a similar level, of course. ;)

--Danny

2006\03\17@200615 by Jinx

face picon face
> Anyway, I'm not complaining about the planting itself - it's almost
> required for good TV.  Along with the time limit extensions and other
> rule-bending

I think it's just something you have to accept or ignore. What could
you "really" build with scrap ? A Flintstone's car ? The wind-powered
coffee grinder is probably a good example of Heath Robinsonism.
Finding and choosing the materials is just one aspect. The challenge is
equally about using those materials the best way, completing the build
and making it sturdy enough to finish or win the contest. I don't mind
if they get given racing seats and harnesses. Some of those contests are
pretty dangerous and the producers have Health & Safety looking over
their shoulders

In the short-lived Demolition Day the competitors were actually sent
temporarily to a sin bin if the program's H&S inspector thought the
construction or work-site practices too dangerous. Reasonable when
you're working with tonnes of concrete, steel, sand etc

2006\03\17@202851 by Danny Sauer

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face
Jinx wrote regarding 'Re: [OT] American Inventor' on Fri, Mar 17 at 19:08:
> > Anyway, I'm not complaining about the planting itself - it's almost
> > required for good TV.  Along with the time limit extensions and other
> > rule-bending
>
> I think it's just something you have to accept or ignore. What could
> you "really" build with scrap ?

I've built some fairly impressive vehicles from scrap - one of my
cars, in fact, was 100% built from materials from a junkyard at the
time when I got the license plates for it (Ok, I used new bearings and
gaskets in the engine).  It was running and driving acceptably, and it
would have been completely safe enough for one of those shows.  After
just replacing some wear items (wheel bearings, lubricants, brake
surfaces, etc) I drove it to a touch over 180 MPH (after estimated
drivetrain slippage - with no slippage it calculated to 212MPH which
I'm sure is not realistic, but it certainly felt faster than the
measured 169MPH in another similar vehicle).

Non-vehicles should be easier.  Perhaps the question should
have also included the time constraints.  Given adequate time and
tools, a lot of cool stuff can be done by smart people.  I would think
anyone who's been around competent engineers with underwhelming
budgets (either professionals or just starving college students trying
to make their own fun) oughtta know that. :)

--Danny

2006\03\17@204650 by Jinx

face picon face

> I've built some fairly impressive vehicles from scrap - one of my
> cars, in fact, was 100% built from materials from a junkyard at the
> time when I got the license plates for it (Ok, I used new bearings and
> gaskets in the engine)

[Cheerful music playing on keyboard]
Peter Griffin - Hey, look at me, Chris ! I'm Yanni, sans the attitude.
Phoney Shouting Guy - My God, that's amazing ! You are so talented
Peter Griffin - Huh ?
Phony Shouting Guy - Wait a second ! Something's not right here. You
were just making it look like you were playing. You're a phony ! Hey
everybody, this guy's just a big fat phony

Ahem ;-)

> It was running and driving acceptably, and it would have been
> completely safe enough for one of those shows

Ah yes, but vehicles on Scrpheap Challenge have to do something
else apart from drive

> Non-vehicles should be easier.  Perhaps the question should
> have also included the time constraints.  Given adequate time and
> tools, a lot of cool stuff can be done by smart people.  I would think
> anyone who's been around competent engineers with underwhelming
> budgets (either professionals or just starving college students trying
> to make their own fun) oughtta know that. :)

The problem with TV programs is that they're on a budget, have
limited time and may not be able to find enough intuitive and experienced
people, let alone whole teams. But there have been some good combos
(Barley Pickers, Chaos Crew, Anoraks). I'm sure there would be
plenty of individuals that would make the cut but not be able to find
two equally-capable mates

2006\03\17@211259 by Danny Sauer

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face
Jinx wrote regarding 'Re: [OT] American Inventor' on Fri, Mar 17 at 19:48:
> Phony Shouting Guy - Wait a second ! Something's not right here. You
> were just making it look like you were playing. You're a phony ! Hey
> everybody, this guy's just a big fat phony
>
> Ahem ;-)

http://www.teleologic.net/danny/gallery/gallery2.alpha/main.php/view/cars/

It was the El Camino (pictures are all of the more modern version
which has several new parts - and a lower top speed capacity traded
for better acceleration).  I'm not sure if I look as dorky as the
pictures make me out to be or not.  Probably so.
   
I no longer have the paper proof, but the verified speed was in the
truck (in the "retired" section, and no, that's not a functional roll
bar but the lights do work).  The speed was "verified" by police
radar, several minutes after I left the Eagle Talon in my dust.  I sat
and waited for that cop for probably 15 minutes.  I've made some
rather dubious decisions in the past (speeding or waiting for the cop,
take your pick)... :)

Though I'm a big fan of Family Guy, so I guess if someone's gonna make
fun of me, that's the way I'd like them to do it. ;)

> > It was running and driving acceptably, and it would have been
> > completely safe enough for one of those shows
>
> Ah yes, but vehicles on Scrpheap Challenge have to do something
> else apart from drive

It won a race.  Races are "something"...  Right?

--Danny, who doesn't street race like that anymore (but still has
rather heavy, size 14E boots) ;)

2006\03\17@233815 by Harold Hallikainen

face picon face

>     "a poncho" so you can pee while standing in a crowd of strangers
>

This reminds me of the "Stadium Pal." Hear David Sedaris describe it at
http://www.thislife.org/pages/descriptions/02/214.html .

Harold


--
FCC Rules Updated Daily at http://www.hallikainen.com

2006\03\17@234130 by William Chops Westfield

face picon face
>  What could you "really" build with scrap ?

An AMAZING amount of stuff gets thrown away for no particularly
good reason (I take that back; there ARE good reasons.  But it's
not because the "stuff" is no longer working.)

For instance, I've take apart many a working CDROM or prninter
for no more than the motors and gears, and have a stunning quantity
of mostly working computers lying around...

But it's very hard to count on finding a PARTICULAR piece of gear
in a particular place at a particular time.

BillW

2006\03\18@002733 by Jinx

face picon face

> >  What could you "really" build with scrap ?

> But it's very hard to count on finding a PARTICULAR piece of
> gear in a particular place at a particular time.

That's what I really meant vis a vis the scrapheap in Scrapheap
Challenge. Specialty items useful to a particular program wouldn't
likely be in a "normal" scrapyard. But hey, they have to make
them serendipitously available otherwise the teams simply couldn't
complete their tasks. Fire engine without a pump ? Hmmm, not
impressive

I'm tormented by the jumbo bin full of fluorescent light fittings
and steel tube I saw down the road last night. Yes, I could
drag it all back here but..................enough's enough I think

2006\03\18@005814 by James Humes

picon face
Here is a list of the inventions from the American Inventor show.
Unfortunately the inventor's names are not included.

www.makezine.com/blog/archive/2006/03/american_inventor_live_blog_fu.html

2006\03\18@013408 by Jinx

face picon face
> http://www.teleologic.net/danny/gallery/gallery2.alpha/main.php/view/cars/

> I'm not sure if I look as dorky as the pictures make me out to be or
> not.  Probably so.

Nah. "nerdlinger" did not spring to mind. "ice-cool assassin" from a
Coen Brothers film maybe

(don't hurt me)


2006\03\18@130707 by Ruben Jönsson

flavicon
face
This discussion intrigued me so I downloaded the episode on a torrent site.

Hes name is Kyle Myhra from Denver Colorado.

{Quote hidden}

He also said that he had been turned down a lot of times when he was the same
age as the kid and it actually had encouraged him to do better.

> encouraged and given access to the info they need.  I was profoundly
> influenced by a few adults who steered me to the right info and cringed to
> see the opposite happen to this kid.
>
> James
> --

Regards / Ruben
===========================================
Ruben Jönsson
AB Liros Electronic
Box 9124
200 39 Malmö Sweden
Tel +46 40142078
============================================

2006\03\20@040916 by Alan B. Pearce

face picon face
>> the device was produced already.
>>
>> http://www.brucemedical.com/ik1605.html
>
>Must be easily 5 years - sure it's longer - since I saw
>a news item about a similar product on sale in NZ

Hey, I bought one in NZ easily 10 years ago. Brought it with me to the UK,
never used it since in the last 8 years ...

We have reached the equinox with a clouded sky, the ground is that dry the
daffodils are only just starting to show colour in their buds, and a promise
of a hose pipe ban in a couple of weeks. January had less rain than the
driest month last summer ...


2006\03\20@050924 by Jinx

face picon face
> We have reached the equinox with a clouded sky, the ground is
> that dry the daffodils are only just starting to show colour in their
> buds, and a promise of a hose pipe ban in a couple of weeks.
> January had less rain than the driest month last summer ...

Hardly rained in Auckland and Northland for months - who's
hogging it all ? Plenty of cloud but never rains. Weather certainly
seems to be strange these days - lots of "worst" "driest" "warmest"

http://www.nzherald.co.nz/location/story.cfm?l_id=132&objectid=10363091



2006\03\20@060551 by Russell McMahon

face
flavicon
face
> Hardly rained in Auckland and Northland for months - who's
> hogging it all ? Plenty of cloud but never rains. Weather certainly
> seems to be strange these days - lots of "worst" "driest" "warmest"
>
> http://www.nzherald.co.nz/location/story.cfm?l_id=132&objectid=10363091

They say: Extreme temperatures saw the mercury rocket to 38.7deg in
Alexandra, Central Otago, in February, and plummet to -9.5degC in
Ophir, 25km northeast of Alexandra, in July.

I had a 'better' year than that recently. And all in 9 weeks :-).

We travelled around the world in 2003 - mid northern Summer. USA and
much of Europe. The world's hottest summer on record ever. (Probably
not the hottest in the last 2000 years even - just records only go
back so far.) Everywhere we went in Europe people would say "Today's
the hottest its been". Fun. 38.7C was by no means a "hot" day then.
40+ common. Phoenix more like 45 C. More? Probably the hottest day I'd
ever seen until visiting Badwater, Death Valley about a week later.
Pushing somewhere slightly over 50C we think. Second hottest (known)
place on earth.

But a few days after that we slept in Yosemite. Another beautiful
roasting day. And that night the temperature fell to about 1C! Not
unexpected at almost 9000 feet ASL if you'd thought about it in
advance. We hadn't :-). Coldest night in 9 weeks and 25 countries.

Some people get altitude sickness in Upper Yosemite. (Tioga pass 9945'
which we came over ex Death Valley. Tuolumne Meadows 8600'. Our upper
campsite slightly above that). Yosemite Valley about 4,000 feet ASL.



       RM

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