Searching \ for '[OT]:: Christchurch earthquake magnitude 6.3 2.5 h' in subject line. ()
Make payments with PayPal - it's fast, free and secure! Help us get a faster server
FAQ page: techref.massmind.org/techref/index.htm?key=christchurch+earthquake
Search entire site for: ': Christchurch earthquake magnitude 6.3 2.5 h'.

Exact match. Not showing close matches.
PICList Thread
'[OT]:: Christchurch earthquake magnitude 6.3 2.5 h'
2011\02\21@203133 by RussellMc

face picon face
Severe,
Near direct hit in city and shallow. 6.3 followded by 5.6 about 5 minutes later.

Technical - earthquake.usgs.gov/earthquakes/pager/events/us/b0001igm/index.html
Map - http://earthquake.usgs.gov/earthquakes/pager/events/us/b0001igm/exposure.png



{Quote hidden}

>

2011\02\22@001052 by Vitaliy

face
flavicon
face
Russell, just heard about the earthquake on the radio. Are you in NZ now? Is your family OK? They say there are "dead people in the streets".

:-(((((


{Original Message removed}

2011\02\22@012244 by Richard Prosser

picon face
Vitality,

Russell should be fine, he is about 800km from the epicentre.

I was about 10k away and it was a good shakeup but little damage
around me. The central city appears to have born the brunt of it with
several buildings collapsed and  a death toll of 65 and growing.

Now we've got several months of aftershocks to look forward to again..

Looks like I'll get the rest of the week off work until the building is checked!

Richard P


On 22 February 2011 05:09, Vitaliy <spam_OUTpiclistTakeThisOuTspammaksimov.org> wrote:
> Russell, just heard about the earthquake on the radio. Are you in NZ now? Is
> your family OK? They say there are "dead people in the streets".
>
> :-(((((
>
>
> {Original Message removed}

2011\02\22@014551 by cdb

flavicon
face
We have several Kiwi's at work, one from Christchurch, we've been following the vision from TVNZ via Channel 10 here and the NZ Herald.

The 10 storey TV3 building just disappearing - all terrible.

Heard an Oz doctor there for a conference complaining no one had told him where he was to stay tonight as his hotel was out of bounds.
Colin
--
cdb, .....colinKILLspamspam@spam@btech-online.co.uk on 22/02/2011
Web presence: http://www.btech-online.co.uk   Hosted by:  http://www.justhost.com.au
 

2011\02\22@021441 by Barry Gershenfeld

picon face
On Mon, Feb 21, 2011 at 5:30 PM, RussellMc <apptechnzspamKILLspamgmail.com> wrote:

> Severe,
> Near direct hit in city and shallow. 6.3 followded by 5.6 about 5 minutes
> later.
>

Sounds like you are OK.  I have an app on my GooglePhone that shows
earthquakes wherever they occur.  Knowing you were in the area, I came here
for the first report.  More useful than Twitter

2011\02\22@043815 by alan.b.pearce

face picon face
> We have several Kiwi's at work, one from Christchurch, we've been following
> the vision from TVNZ via Channel 10 here and the NZ Herald.
>
> The 10 storey TV3 building just disappearing - all terrible.
>
> Heard an Oz doctor there for a conference complaining no one had told him
> where he was to stay tonight as his hotel was out of bounds.

Bleedin' Ozzie ... tell him to go to a hospital, they can probably put him to work ...

Was a bit of a shock to have the radio alarm come on with the earthquake as headline news.

Nephew accounted for.

Sister in law, her husband and daughter accounted for. Apparently it took her 3 1/2 hours to drive out of the centre of the city to her home, a trip that normally takes around 30 minutes. The streets were just grid locked. Their house is structurally fine, driveway is a mess, house contents a mess on the floor.

Still need to account for a cousin.
-- Scanned by iCritical.

2011\02\22@050207 by Tamas Rudnai

face picon face
Oh man... Does not sound too good even if no one has hurt.

My sympathy to everyone over there and to those who has relatives and
friends there.

Tamas



On Tue, Feb 22, 2011 at 9:37 AM, <.....alan.b.pearceKILLspamspam.....stfc.ac.uk> wrote:

{Quote hidden}

>

2011\02\22@054653 by Brent Brown

picon face
Good to hear you're ok Richard. Thoughts with everyone there for what lies ahead.

> Russell should be fine, he is about 800km from the epicentre.
>
> I was about 10k away and it was a good shakeup but little damage
> around me. The central city appears to have born the brunt of it with
> several buildings collapsed and  a death toll of 65 and growing.
>
> Now we've got several months of aftershocks to look forward to again..
>
> Looks like I'll get the rest of the week off work until the building is checked!
>
> Richard P

2011\02\22@061210 by alan.b.pearce

face picon face
> Severe,
> Near direct hit in city and shallow. 6.3 followded by 5.6 about 5 minutes later.
>
> Technical -
>  earthquake.usgs.gov/earthquakes/pager/events/us/b0001igm/index.html
> Map - http://earthquake.usgs.gov/earthquakes/pager/events/us/b0001igm/exposure.png

Pictures http://www.nzherald.co.nz/


-- Scanned by iCritical.

2011\02\22@064809 by RussellMc

face picon face
> > Severe,
> > Near direct hit in city and shallow. 6.3 followded by 5.6 about 5 minutes later.
> >
> > Technical -
> >  earthquake.usgs.gov/earthquakes/pager/events/us/b0001igm/index.html
> > Map - http://earthquake.usgs.gov/earthquakes/pager/events/us/b0001igm/exposure.png
>
> Pictures http://www.nzherald.co.nz/

I didn't feel it.
I'm in Ningbo, China, almost exactly 6000 kilometres away
http://www.mapcrow.info/cgi-bin/cities_distance_airpt2.cgi?city3=-2663963,N&city4=-2152220,C

Death toll is relatively low - but the 656 official count seems likely
to rise into 100+ bsed on general happening so this sort.

My son is OK as is where he lives. But some of the ground nearby has
"liquefied" - an effect people have got all too used to after the last
quake. It's a sign that there has been severe subterranean activity in
the immediate vicinity.  Where this occurs there is also often lots of
structtutra; danage and condemned houses in the area. Even if the
house you are in is not damaged it shows that you were where it was
at.


Russell

2011\02\22@171457 by Peter

picon face
Others likely found this before, but it is interesting and scary:

 http://www.christchurchquakemap.co.nz/

2011\02\23@020530 by Richard Prosser

picon face
Another website
<http://quake.crowe.co.nz/>

RP

On 22 February 2011 22:14, Peter <EraseMEplpeter2006spam_OUTspamTakeThisOuTyahoo.com> wrote:
> Others likely found this before, but it is interesting and scary:
>
>  http://www.christchurchquakemap.co.nz/
>
>
>
>

2011\02\23@021029 by Richard Prosser

picon face
On 22 February 2011 09:37,  <alan.b.pearcespamspam_OUTstfc.ac.uk> wrote:
>> We have several Kiwi's at work, one from Christchurch, we've been following
>> the vision from TVNZ via Channel 10 here and the NZ Herald.
>>
>> The 10 storey TV3 building just disappearing - all terrible.
>>
>> Heard an Oz doctor there for a conference complaining no one had told him
>> where he was to stay tonight as his hotel was out of bounds.
>
> Bleedin' Ozzie ... tell him to go to a hospital, they can probably put him to work ...
>
> Was a bit of a shock to have the radio alarm come on with the earthquake as headline news.
>
> Nephew accounted for.
>
> Sister in law, her husband and daughter accounted for. Apparently it took her 3 1/2 hours to drive out of the centre of the city to her home, a trip that normally takes around 30 minutes. The streets were just grid locked. Their house is structurally fine, driveway is a mess, house contents a mess on the floor.
>
> Still need to account for a cousin.
> --
> Scanned by iCritical.
>
>

2011\02\23@022022 by Richard Prosser

picon face
On 23 February 2011 07:10, Richard Prosser <@spam@rhprosserKILLspamspamgmail.com> wrote:
{Quote hidden}

>> -

2011\02\23@031427 by IVP

face picon face
> If you are concerned regarding your cousin, send me (offlist) what
> details you have on him/her and I'll see what I can find out.

And http://www.newstalkzb.co.nz are putting out messages

2011\02\23@050503 by alan.b.pearce

face picon face
> Colin,
>
> If you are concerned regarding your cousin, send me (offlist) what
> details you have on him/her and I'll see what I can find out.
>
> Stuff like contacting friends or employers or neighbours is more
> likely to be easier for me than for you.
>
> Richard

Actually it was me who hadn't heard from my cousin. I have now heard from his sister who had a text from him. He is safe and with some friends. His house, in his words 'is a bit stuffed' ...

Thanks for the offer anyway, Richard.



-- Scanned by iCritical.

2011\02\23@160329 by N. T.

picon face
RussellMc wrote:
> Severe,
> Near direct hit in city and shallow. 6.3 followded by 5.6 about 5 minutes later.
>

Lyttelton Harbour volcano waking up

2011\02\23@172045 by Richard Prosser

picon face
On 23 February 2011 21:03, N. T. <RemoveMEntypesemiTakeThisOuTspamgmail.com> wrote:
> RussellMc wrote:
>> Severe,
>> Near direct hit in city and shallow. 6.3 followded by 5.6 about 5 minutes later.
>>
>
>  Lyttelton Harbour volcano waking up?
> --


Rangitoto Next ???

RP

2011\02\23@172630 by Yigit Turgut

picon face
I hope everybody is fine and the damage is minimum.

On Tue, Feb 22, 2011 at 3:30 AM, RussellMc <spamBeGoneapptechnzspamBeGonespamgmail.com> wrote:
{Quote hidden}

>

2011\02\24@174119 by N. T.

picon face
Richard Prosser wrote:
>>
>>  Lyttelton Harbour volcano waking up?
>> --
>
>  Rangitoto Next ???
>

Hope it won't happen.
My sympathy to everyone over there and to those who has relatives and
friends there.

2011\02\24@190610 by IVP

face picon face
>> Rangitoto Next ???
>
> Hope it won't happen

Living 10 miles from it, I tend to agree with that. Vote "No" to
boulders through the roof and pyroclastic flows

Auckland is built on volcanoes. Like Christchurch, Pompeii
and New Orleans, at some point there will be a time when you
think, hmmm, maybe the town would've been better off up
the road a bit

Christchurch is particularly prone to liquefaction during tremors
because of the underlying geology, and that allowed for more
damage than might have happened on solid ground

http://www.guardian.co.uk/weather/2011/feb/23/new-zealand-christchurch-earthquake-geology

On the surface of course it's a very nice place to live. Plains,
hills, harbours, rivers etc

You might have seen the dramatic footage of the big quake near
Anchorage in 1964, 9.2 tremor + liquefaction + tsunami

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/1964_Alaska_earthquake

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=EoJLfsRvE5c and others

2011\02\24@195455 by IVP

face picon face
> Rangitoto Next ???
>

Iceland's volcanoes are full of maggots apparently

http://home.clear.net.nz/pages/joecolquitt/bug_out.jpg

Been noting Sky's program synopses. Whoever's doing them
maybe out to be taking some remedial grammar and spelling
courses (it's its, there their, punctuation, sentence structure etc)

Snapped that one last night. Maybe I'll pass them on to Sky one da

2011\02\24@195724 by IVP

face picon face
> maybe out to be taking some remedial grammar and spelling

Pot, meet Kettle

'ought'

2011\02\24@201936 by Neil Cherry

flavicon
face
On 02/24/2011 07:06 PM, IVP wrote:

> Auckland is built on volcanoes. Like Christchurch, Pompeii
> and New Orleans, at some point there will be a time when you
> think, hmmm, maybe the town would've been better off up
> the road a bit

New Orleans?

-- Linux Home Automation         Neil Cherry       TakeThisOuTncherryEraseMEspamspam_OUTlinuxha.com
http://www.linuxha.com/                         Main site
http://linuxha.blogspot.com/                    My HA Blog
Author of:            Linux Smart Homes For Dummie

2011\02\24@203018 by Oli Glaser

flavicon
face
On 25/02/2011 00:54, IVP wrote:
>> Rangitoto Next ???
>>
> Iceland's volcanoes are full of maggots apparently
>
> http://home.clear.net.nz/pages/joecolquitt/bug_out.jpg
>
> Been noting Sky's program synopses. Whoever's doing them
> maybe out to be taking some remedial grammar and spelling
> courses (it's its, there their, punctuation, sentence structure etc)
>
> Snapped that one last night. Maybe I'll pass them on to Sky one day

Lol, and to be picky it should be "larvae" anyway...
Seems many folk don't take spelling and grammar as seriously as they used to. Amazes me how many mistakes (not just typo's) are made in "respectable" publications.
I passed by a local shop the other day, they had a big new main sign which looked very nice BUT had a spelling mistake (can't remember what it was now) - surely in the age of spell checkers, online dictionaries etc  this should happen less, even if our literacy levels are diminishing. A bit like calculators vs mental arithmetic maybe.

2011\02\24@203934 by Carl Denk

flavicon
face
I don't think New Orleans is a or previously volcanic region. That's the mouth of the Mississippi river, and the terrain is flat, with any terrain more than 1000' above sea level maybe 500 miles away. I would think the main soil/rock type being sedimentary.

On 2/24/2011 8:11 PM, Neil Cherry wrote:
> On 02/24/2011 07:06 PM, IVP wrote:
>
>    
>> Auckland is built on volcanoes. Like Christchurch, Pompeii
>> and New Orleans, at some point there will be a time when you
>> think, hmmm, maybe the town would've been better off up
>> the road a bit
>>      
> New Orleans?
>
>

2011\02\24@210942 by IVP

face picon face
>> New Orleans?

>I don't think New Orleans is a or previously volcanic region

No, I meant it was built in the wrong place - below sea level
in a region prone to severe flooding, like many inhabited places
around the world

That said, Yellowstone might get it anyway ;-

2011\02\24@212922 by Neil Cherry

flavicon
face
On 02/24/2011 09:09 PM, IVP wrote:
>>> New Orleans?
>
>> I don't think New Orleans is a or previously volcanic region
>
> No, I meant it was built in the wrong place - below sea level
> in a region prone to severe flooding, like many inhabited places
> around the world
>
> That said, Yellowstone might get it anyway ;-)

Yeah, I was thinking about that too. 'Cording to da movie '2012'
their gonna ruin my birthday party. So I'm gonna start a day earlier.
At least I'll get my presents and a light show.

Your mileage may vary, the world may not end on that day and please
don't talk to me the day after or I'll make sure you wish it did. ;-)

-- Linux Home Automation         Neil Cherry       RemoveMEncherryspamTakeThisOuTlinuxha.com
http://www.linuxha.com/                         Main site
http://linuxha.blogspot.com/                    My HA Blog
Author of:            Linux Smart Homes For Dummie

2011\02\24@230048 by Carl Denk

flavicon
face
That's what we like about Northern Ohio. We do get once a year or so, light tremors, magnitude 1 is heavy. But no poisonous snakes or other critters, bad wild animals, etc. Though we do get some tornadoes in the summer, but usually they are far apart and cover a small area. A rather uneventful place to live. :)

On 2/24/2011 9:09 PM, IVP wrote:
>>> New Orleans?
>>>        
>    
>> I don't think New Orleans is a or previously volcanic region
>>      
> No, I meant it was built in the wrong place - below sea level
> in a region prone to severe flooding, like many inhabited places
> around the world
>
> That said, Yellowstone might get it anyway ;-)
>

2011\02\25@003855 by Kerry Wentworth

flavicon
face
As long as Lake Erie doesn't catch fire.

Kerry


Carl Denk wrote:
{Quote hidden}

-- Internal Virus Database is out-of-date.
Checked by AVG Anti-Virus.
Version: 7.0.289 / Virus Database: 267.11.13 - Release Date: 10/6/05

2011\02\25@083519 by Carl Denk

flavicon
face
The Cuyahoga river fire was years ago, with many heavy industrial plants providing jobs for 10's of thousands of people. Today it is much cleaner, with rowing shells skimming the waters. Wish other places in the world had made as much progress in pollution control, and their goods reflect the price of that progress. Lake Erie also has became much clearer, mainly due to the invasive zebra mussels.

On 2/25/2011 12:38 AM, Kerry Wentworth wrote:
{Quote hidden}

>

2011\02\25@083530 by Olin Lathrop

face picon face
Carl Denk wrote:
> I don't think New Orleans is a or previously volcanic region.
                              ^^^^
.... speaking of bad language

I think part of the problem is people don't even bother to look over what
they wrote anymore.  Just bang it out and hit enter.  Nobody is expecting
perfection, but there is little excuse for the real obvious stuff a quick
look-over would have found.

> That's
> the mouth of the Mississippi river, and the terrain is flat, with any
> terrain more than 1000' above sea level maybe 500 miles away. I would
> think the main soil/rock type being sedimentary.

I took Joe's comment to be referring to natural disasters in general.  In
the case of New Orleans, the gotcha is hurricanes and the floods they cause..

Probably many cities are vulnerable if you look well past human lifespans.
How many major world cities would not expect to see a significant natural
disaster in a 1000 years?  Certainly not San Francisco, Los Angeles, Naples,
or Tokyo.

2011\02\25@110250 by N. T.

picon face
Richard Prosser  wrote:
>
>  Rangitoto Next ???
>

Very impressive - only 1km depth.

3.3M, depth: 1km 25/2/2011 17:46

http://www.christchurchquakemap.co.nz

2011\02\25@174819 by IVP

face picon face
> Probably many cities are vulnerable if you look well past human
> lifespans. How many major world cities would not expect to see
> a significant natural disaster in a 1000 years ?

I know in the UK that there have been serious questions asked
about existing towns and new developments on recognised flood
plains which suffer utterly predictably when there's another "One
in a century" rainstorm

The Netherlands is the obvious problem-solution example

Although it's all relative. In 1667, the Dutch invaded and occupied
the Isle Of Sheppey, a low-lying island in the Thames estuary. They
abandoned it soon after, suffering from altitude sickness

Jo

2011\02\25@195039 by Oli Glaser

flavicon
face
On 25/02/2011 01:29, Oli Glaser wrote:
>   Amazes me how many mistakes (not just typo's) are made in
> "respectable" publications.

And also in my e-mails - should be "typos"....

2011\02\26@022327 by cdb

flavicon
face
:: In 1667, the Dutch invaded and occupied
:: the Isle Of Sheppey, a low-lying island in the Thames estuary. They
:: abandoned it soon after, suffering from altitude sickness

Well if they had been 278 years later, they'd have discovered their own off shore fireworks container. I bet they'd wished they'd acclimatised now free fireworks for life.

Still William and Mary did alright, pretty good at making furniture.

Colin
--
cdb, colinEraseMEspam.....btech-online.co.uk on 26/02/2011
Web presence: http://www.btech-online.co.uk   Hosted by:  http://www.justhost.com.au
 


2011\02\26@110248 by Gerhard Fiedler

picon face
Olin Lathrop wrote:

> Probably many cities are vulnerable if you look well past human
> lifespans. How many major world cities would not expect to see a
> significant natural disaster in a 1000 years?  Certainly not San
> Francisco, Los Angeles, Naples, or Tokyo.

I'd never have expected to read "major world cities" and "Naples" in one sentence :)

I think if you go down to the "world" level of Naples, Italy, there are many cities that don't expect a significant natural disaster. Naples has only 1M habitants and besides that not much world significance, so you'd have to include all cities with 1M+ habitants. Quite a few of them out there...

In Germany there are Berlin, Hamburg and München. I don't think any of these expects a significant natural disaster -- unless the sea level rises significantly, in which case Hamburg probably is affected.

In Brazil, there are Brasília, Rio de Janeiro, São Paulo, and a number of less known cities (around ten or so, I think). I'm not aware of any significant natural disaster waiting for any of them (of course, again with the exception of possible significant sea level rise which would affect the cities near the ocean -- of the three listed above, that's only Rio de Janeiro).

Gerhard

2011\02\26@125030 by Olin Lathrop

face picon face
Gerhard Fiedler wrote:
> I'd never have expected to read "major world cities" and "Naples" in
> one sentence :)

You're right, Naples isn't as large as the others and really shouldn't be in
that list.  I only mentioned it because of the unusually large threat it
faces.  It's probably up there in world cities if you look at the
probability of the threat times the number of people likely to die from it.


********************************************************************
Embed Inc, Littleton Massachusetts, http://www.embedinc.com/products
(978) 742-9014.  Gold level PIC consultants since 2000

2011\02\26@142003 by N. T.

picon face
Olin Lathrop wrote:
> Carl Denk wrote:
>> I don't think New Orleans is a or previously volcanic region.
>                               ^^^^
> ... speaking of bad language
>
> I think part of the problem is people don't even bother to look over what
> they wrote anymore.  Just bang it out and hit enter.  Nobody is expecting
> perfection, but there is little excuse for the real obvious stuff a quick
> look-over would have found.
>

What is real obvious for you may not be that obvious for non-native
English Language member of the list. Some reasonable level of
tolerance should be expected here. Sometimes, depending on text typing
and reading options, typing correctly and checking out the typed in
text may be a problem even for native English speaker.

2011\02\26@151158 by RussellMc

face picon face
> Olin Lathrop wrote:
> > Carl Denk wrote:
> >> I don't think New Orleans is a volcanic region.
> >                               ^^^^
> > ... speaking of bad language
> >
> > I think part of the problem is people don't even bother to look over what
> > they wrote anymore.  Just bang it out and hit enter.  Nobody is expecting
> > perfection, but there is little excuse for the real obvious stuff a quick
> > look-over would have found.
> >
>
> What is real obvious for you may not be that obvious for non-native
> English Language member of the list. Some reasonable level of
> tolerance should be expected here. Sometimes, depending on text typing
> and reading options, typing correctly and checking out the typed in
> text may be a problem even for native English speaker.

Nah. Olin isn't serious. Even looking on from far off China (or it
would be far off if I wasn't here instead of "there") it's obvious
that he's just playing agent provocateur / Devil's advocate (add
accents as desired) and trying to maintain the general list
discontentment level. His own posts regularly contain the same old
spelling mistakes time after time (as opposed to typos which slide
through brain filters invisibly) so clearly his comments on "just bang
it out and hit enter" is tongue in cheek.

Beirut will be destroyed by a massive Tsunami (if it hasn't already
recently be destroyed soon before that by human stupidity (again) -
it's only a question of when.

Rangitoto burst into existence less than 1000 years ago, possibly much
less. By itself it produced double the volcanic material of the whole
50 or so Auckland volcanoes before it.  They have been getting bigger
and more frequent. Next one is well overdue. Most likely location is
Eastern suburbs maybe slightly out to sea - say St Heliers. Should do
wonders for my property values - I live some km outside the edge of
the "hot spot" - they tell me.

The "Taranaki" (aka Mt Egmont) that was conically perfect enough to
stand in as Fujisan in "The last Samurai", is not the mountain that
was there when very major things happened some millennia back. The old
mountain completely self destructed and the new one replaced it. The
present city of New Plymouth lies across a number of flow channels
from the mountain and if the mountain woke properly much of the town
would be destroyed. If the mountain emulated its forbear the locals
would probably not need to be concerned about the flow channels.

The largest volcano on earth in the last 20 years, presently
"dormant", so big that locals can't see it, with a crater lake ~ afair
20+ miles wide and ~?40 miles long, with hot springs bubbling out of
the shore sands and hot running streams (arguably some sort of clue)
is just biding the day when it does its encore. Next to it Vesuvius,
Krakatoa, Mt St Helens and a few dozen more all combined are still
also rans.Last time the respectable sized mountain some kms to the
south was overtopped by a pyroclastic wave about 1 km higher than the
mountain. As these travel at a good fraction of the speed of sound,
any near observers (vanishingly few) would not have been subsequent
rapporteurs. (The mountain pumps an ejecta colum up out of the
essential atmosphere - maybe 50 km tall column of ash etc balanced on
the new flow. THEN the mountain takes a breather ... . The now
unsupported column has to go somewhere and does.
When Taupo reawakens, those who live in Christchurch will be thankful
that they do.


          Russell


..

2011\02\26@151529 by RussellMc

face picon face
> In Germany there are Berlin, Hamburg and München. I don't think any of
> these expects a significant natural disaster

Interesting choice of examples.
Are you suggesting that Arthur Travers Harris was unnatural?
:-)


              Russell

2011\02\26@152213 by John Gardner

picon face
The largest known quake in the US since record-keeping began...

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/1812_New_Madrid_earthquake

Not the first place you might look for what would have undoubtedly
been a disaster of the first order had the region been more settled.

As it is today...

Jac

2011\02\26@170155 by Gerhard Fiedler
picon face
Olin Lathrop wrote:

> Gerhard Fiedler wrote:
>> I'd never have expected to read "major world cities" and "Naples" in
>> one sentence :)
>
> You're right, Naples isn't as large as the others and really
> shouldn't be in that list.  I only mentioned it because of the
> unusually large threat it faces.  It's probably up there in world
> cities if you look at the probability of the threat times the number
> of people likely to die from it.

That would be "threatened cities" rather than "world cities". Anyway,
while there are quite a number o cities that are somewhat endangered,
there are quite a few with low threat levels -- probably more than those
with high threat levels, you just never hear from them :)

Besides that are of course the man-made threats, and that's a whole
different story then. São Paulo, Brazil, for example, is partially
flooded every summer. This is not due to a natural disaster -- the
summer rains are just that, summer rains, as they have been for most of
known history --, but due to really bad urban planning.

Gerhard

2011\02\26@190700 by Olin Lathrop

face picon face
N. T. wrote:
> What is real obvious for you may not be that obvious for non-native
> English Language member of the list. Some reasonable level of
> tolerance should be expected here.

To some extent.  The kind of errors non-native speakers usually make are
different from just sloppiness and lack of checking.  Of course sometimes
errors produce text that looks correct but has a different meaning.  Then
you can't fault people for interpreting it as written.

Non-native english speakers definitely get some slack, but in the end this
is a english language list, so posts will be interpreted that way.  It is
also a good idea for those that aren't so good with english to identify
themselves as such if they want the aforementioned slack.

> Sometimes, depending on text typing
> and reading options, typing correctly and checking out the typed in
> text may be a problem even for native English speaker.

Anyone can at least quickly look over what they wrote.  Whether you like it
or not, you are constantly judged by what you write and how you write it.


********************************************************************
Embed Inc, Littleton Massachusetts, http://www.embedinc.com/products
(978) 742-9014.  Gold level PIC consultants since 2000

2011\02\26@193244 by RussellMc

face picon face
> To some extent.  The kind of  ... ... native English speaker.

An interesting thumbnail sketch of your psychology and mindset :-)
A minority would subscribe to a majority of your "gives,".
Whatever.

> Anyone can at least quickly look over what they wrote.  Whether you like it
> or not, you are constantly judged by what you write and how you write it.

It also pays to use a spalliing chicker, should you care, as the mind
which produces an error rather than a typo will also probably often
not note the error when checking.

And, if yo do use a spilliing chucker it is a good idea[tm] to
occasionally CAREFULLY check it's allowed exceptions list and purge
any errors that have crept in. Otherwise you can keep getting
redeculous* mistakes and never notice.


            Russell.

Olin: Hint - check you mental and system exception list. I know I
make consistent misteaks witch sale threw my mental flitters. Yew may
ore may know bee aware that yew doo to.

2011\02\26@200131 by Olin Lathrop

face picon face
RussellMc wrote:
> Olin: Hint - check you mental and system exception list. I know I
> make consistent misteaks witch sale threw my mental flitters. Yew may
> ore may know bee aware that yew doo to.

If your mind thinks something is spelled a certain way, then of course
you're not going to catch it on proofreading.  That also explains why those
spelling mistakes are consistent (here's a good example, I was wondering
whether that should be "consistant" or "consistent".  I copied it from you
above, and it looks more right too.  No, I'm not going to take the time to
look it up for a PIClist post).  I usually do look back at what I wrote and
more often than not find something to fix.  However for me running a spell
checker is too much trouble for PIClist posts and isn't in my workflow.  Oh
well.  You are of course free to judge me as you like based on spelling
errors or any other errors or lack thereof.  I'm fine with that.

I do think, however, that my posts are not so badly written as to be
annoying to read most of the time (due to language structure at least).
Unfortunately some others here write posts that are usually annoying and
make them look dumb on a regular basis.  This includes some native english
speakers (duh).

Even non-native speakers have little excuse for not following very basic
language rules, like first letter capitalized and period at end.  The
student who was just asking about his temperature controller homework is a
great example.  He's obviously not a native english speaker.  The unnusual
choice of words and grammar was therefore no problem.  However, with no
start or end to sentences the verbal diarrhea was just too annoying to
bother decoding and responding to.  My mental process was something like:

 idiot_list[nidiots++] = "..."
 delete


********************************************************************
Embed Inc, Littleton Massachusetts, http://www.embedinc.com/products
(978) 742-9014.  Gold level PIC consultants since 2000

2011\02\27@012925 by N. T.

picon face
Olin Lathrop wrote:
> N. T. wrote:
>> Sometimes, depending on text typing
>> and reading options, typing correctly and checking out the typed in
>> text may be a problem even for native English speaker.
>
> Anyone can at least quickly look over what they wrote.  Whether you like it
> or not, you are constantly judged by what you write and how you write it.
>

Yes, one is judged by what he/she write, and yes, one can at least
quickly look over what he/she  wrote, the problem is that, still, the
probability of the mistake is not zero.
Talking about the list, I'd say one is to balance between 2
approaches, I'd call them optimistic and pessimistic styles of
posting.
The optimistic - is the one when a user assumes, the mistakes will be
forgiven, so he could concentrate more on creativity and productivity.
The pessimistic - is the one when a user thinks that the cost of the
mistake will be too high. In this case he talks a little trying not to
make a mistake and not to say anything that can be interpreted
negatively. I tend to agree that the second approach fits better the
global list, but you know, without the ability to be creative there is
no much sense to post for some.

2011\02\27@070935 by Gerhard Fiedler

picon face
RussellMc wrote:

>> In Germany there are Berlin, Hamburg and München. I don't think any of
>> these expects a significant natural disaster
>
> Interesting choice of examples.

Me being born in Germany, the only three cities with 1M+ habitants of
Germany isn't really that "interesting" :)

> Are you suggesting that Arthur Travers Harris was unnatural?
> :-)

He himself probably not, but the "disaster" part associated with him
definitely was.
Gerhard

2011\02\28@080124 by N. T.

picon face
IVP wrote:
>
> Christchurch is particularly prone to liquefaction during tremors
> because of the underlying geology, and that allowed for more
> damage than might have happened on solid ground
>
> http://www.guardian.co.uk/weather/2011/feb/23/new-zealand-christchurch-earthquake-geology
>
> On the surface of course it's a very nice place to live. Plains,
> hills, harbours, rivers etc
>

I am not getting what's going on to South-West of Christchurch now:

3.3M, depth: 0km 28/2/2011 20:22
http://www.christchurchquakemap.co.nz/

Zero depth. Would the next be negative depth?
No humor or sarcasm, just wondering what's that? How does that feel to
be there? This seems to be the place where September quake line
crosses latest quake line

2011\02\28@174402 by Richard Prosser

picon face
On 1 March 2011 02:01, N. T. <EraseMEntypesemispamgmail.com> wrote:
{Quote hidden}

>


'[OT]:: Christchurch earthquake magnitude 6.3 2.5 h'
2011\03\01@092930 by N. T.
picon face
Olin Lathrop wrote:
>
> Non-native english speakers definitely get some slack, but in the end this
> is a english language list, so posts will be interpreted that way.  It is
> also a good idea for those that aren't so good with english to identify
> themselves as such if they want the aforementioned slack.
>

That's a good point, those who aren't so good with English may
sometimes underestimate their lack of the language knowledge. They
would try using "advanced" word constructs or even try using slang.
Eventually this would lead to serious misunderstandings. The kind of
creativity better be avoided on public list or even in private
communications if there were risk of misunderstanding. (Nobody was
meant specifically).

2011\03\01@094002 by N. T.

picon face
Richard Prosser wrote:
>
> Yes, that one was "0" depth which means closer than about 2.5km deep.
> The epicentre was about 6km away from home, so we felt it, but no
> worse than many of the other aftershocks we're getting.
>
> One thing to consider is that the epicentre is the surface location
> above the initiation point (isocentre ?) , the centre of mass movement
> can be several km from this  and the actual movement magnetude can be
> focussed or dissipated by the type and location of other features. It
> seems to be a very complicated issue.
>

Thanks for the commenting. I tend to think the topic is getting
somewhat sensitive. I wish there will be no new serious earthquakes in
the region.

2011\03\01@094050 by RussellMc

face picon face
>> It is
>> also a good idea for those that aren't so good with english to identify
>> themselves as such

> That's a good point

Vaguely.
Most people have little trouble determining that a poster does not
have English as their lingua Franca.

Those few who have trouble determining this would not be hurt by
taking the extra effort required to learn whether a person is in fact
"English speaking". It usually takes no more than reading a post to
the end rather than ripping into it on a line by line basis.

Some seem unable to master this skill.


       Roussea

2011\03\01@142203 by Richard Prosser

picon face
On 2 March 2011 03:39, N. T. <RemoveMEntypesemiEraseMEspamEraseMEgmail.com> wrote:
> Richard Prosser wrote:
>>
>> Yes, that one was "0" depth which means closer than about 2.5km deep.
>> The epicentre was about 6km away from home, so we felt it, but no
>> worse than many of the other aftershocks we're getting.
>>
>> One thing to consider is that the epicentre is the surface location
>> above the initiation point (isocentre ?) , the centre of mass movement
>> can be several km from this  and the actual movement magnetude can be
>> focussed or dissipated by the type and location of other features. It
>> seems to be a very complicated issue.
>>
>
> Thanks for the commenting. I tend to think the topic is getting
> somewhat sensitive. I wish there will be no new serious earthquakes in
> the region.
>
> --


So do I !!

RP

2011\03\05@015610 by RussellMc

face picon face
About 7:42pm here, March 4th.

Another estimated 5.x aftershock just hit a few minutes ago.
The text message just received from my son indicates it wasn't bad enough to
take out the phone systems. That's good.
House OK he says.
Ambulance sirens can be heard.

Something like a war zone but different.
A lot of people have left and many more are planning to.

Without intending to detract in any way whatsoever from the Christchurch
tragedy, I think it's worth noting that for every person killed in
Christchurch to date in the recent quakes, there were between 400 to 1200
deaths* in Haiti in their 2010 quake. Once disasters get above a certain
size they get very hard for the mind to grasp unless intimately involved,
and often not even then.
(*Haiti death toll estimate varies very widely. From perhaps under 100,000
to well over 300,000)

2011\03\05@020837 by Richard Prosser

picon face
Now reported at "only" 4.8 magnitude (Geonet). It did feel like a 5+
however & carried on for a good 20 seconds or so.

11km deep & centred close to Lytteton  (again).

Today as been quite "busy" after a couple of quieter days

RP


On 5 March 2011 06:55, RussellMc <RemoveMEapptechnzspam_OUTspamKILLspamgmail.com> wrote:
{Quote hidden}

>

2011\03\05@031100 by Brent Brown

picon face
I was in Christchurch wednesday/thursday on a team helping cleanup around houses in the eastern suburbs. Quite an experience, got to see a little of the hardships people are facing. Didn't get to experience any aftershocks firsthand (we stayed in Dunsandel each night), but we did experience much appreciation and hospitality :-)

On 5 Mar 2011 at 7:08, Richard Prosser wrote:

> Now reported at "only" 4.8 magnitude (Geonet). It did feel like a 5+
> however & carried on for a good 20 seconds or so.
>
> 11km deep & centred close to Lytteton  (again).
>
> Today as been quite "busy" after a couple of quieter days

2011\03\05@032405 by Richard Prosser

picon face
On 5 March 2011 08:11, Brent Brown <RemoveMEbrent.brownTakeThisOuTspamspamclear.net.nz> wrote:
> I was in Christchurch wednesday/thursday on a team helping cleanup around
> houses in the eastern suburbs. Quite an experience, got to see a little of the
> hardships people are facing. Didn't get to experience any aftershocks firsthand (we
> stayed in Dunsandel each night), but we did experience much appreciation and
> hospitality :-)
>


Thanks for the assistance Brent,
It sounds like you have assisted more than I have - we are just trying
to carry on as normal - and, fortunately are in a position to do so.

Richard P

2011\03\05@151925 by N. T.

picon face
RussellMc wrote:
> Another estimated 5.x aftershock just hit a few minutes ago.

Looking at Google map, I'd suggest that new Greendale Fault line aims
at  Kaikoura Canyon. It makes impression that the fragment between
Christchurch and  Kaikoura slides down north over the canyon. Probably
scientists have developed the model of the process

2011\03\05@211548 by RussellMc

face picon face
NT said:
*Looking at Google map, I'd suggest that new Greendale Fault line aims
at  Kaikoura Canyon. It makes impression that the fragment between
Christchurch and  Kaikoura slides down north over the canyon. Probably
*
*scientists have developed the model of the process.*

*** WARNING *** - Russell here muses on stuff well outside his areas of
competence or substantial knowledge. It would be nice to know that
appropriate experts had discounted these ideas, but odds are there is no
merit in these ponderings.

____________

I certainly hope that nothing too major happens at the canyon proper.

The Kaikoura Canyon is a deep water vee extending in towards the shore from
*beyond* the continental shelf. (Actually curls in from somewhat northwards
but that's detail). It is, according to my searching of the worlds maps some
years ago, THE closest approach  on earth of deep ocean waters to shore. You
can see the point where the shoreward end of the trench starts from shore.

You can stand in a very small parking area by the road side (just a gravel
patch) and see Sperm Whales surfacing for a breather and then rolling over
with a large aerial flick of their tails as they head back down the trench
for another meal of giant squid in the adjacent deep ocean. This is NZ's
premier spot for whale sightings ans so good that all the whale watching
boats from just-up-the-way Kaikoura come down to here to watch.

Using binoculars from shore helps but you can see a steady stream of whales
by eye alone. Dolphins cross the area in transit regularly and a scramble
down the rocky bank below the road can bring you into sudden closer than
expected proximity with a gang of larger than expected seals (ask me how I
know).

*** BUT *** if anything like the Christchurch quakes started happening .on
the walls of he trench it could produce landslides down the steeply sloping
sides in deep ocean and quite possibly the tapering rising channel may act
as a "shaped charge" type amplifier.

It wouldn't be hard to imagine it producing an extremely large Tsunami at
the immediate shore point (say 50-100 feet and maybe more) and something not
too much less up the coast at nearby Kaikoura - but perhaps at an angle to
the coast. And very likely something coming down coast toward Christchurch
:-(


Presumably the people who actually know something about this are well ahead
of me on this, if there is any risk.


Russel

2011\03\05@215122 by Oli Glaser

flavicon
face
On 06/03/2011 02:15, RussellMc wrote:
> Presumably the people who actually know something about this are well ahead
> of me on this, if there is any risk.

Possibly, but I'm wondering what would there be to be done even if they are aware of it all?
I don't really know anything about such things (fortunately in this country we have little need to) but your analysis seems quite plausible (to me at a quick read - not looked at any maps)
I understand there is some benefit in predicting these things, but I imagine politics/economics will often be a large(r) factor in deciding what to actually do about them. I guess if you are going to do something like evacuate millions of people and give up (various levels of, depending on area) lucrative land then some pretty concrete evidence would be needed.

2011\03\06@032822 by RussellMc

face picon face
> Possibly, but I'm wondering what would there be to be done even if they
> are aware of it all?


Tsunami can be dealt with pretty much on an immediate coastal basis in
most cases. MUCH more so than eg earthquake itself.

Once you decide there is a prospect you can easily [tm] minimum quake
to Tsunami arrival times and can have a moderately good idea of
maximum wave amplitude and "reach".

If probabilities were high enough you can easily put in monitoring for
an actual wave and alarms. Once people are convinced this is serious
they tend to cooperate reasonably well. Satellite and other aerial
before and after photos of Bunda Aceh (which are available)(I have
some somewhere) and photos of Samoa (many available) help convey
conviction. The large majority in most possibly affected areas need
only move very short distances taking only short times to be out of
tsunami risk in most cases.

Photos of Bunda Aceh give and extremely good idea of what is and isn't
liable to provide protection and how far inland things can happen in
certain locations.

A Tsunami is essentially a step change in incoming water velocity -
NOT a normal wave. Once you see what they do and how they work you can
have a fair idea what you need to do in a given case.

Arrival time would need expert input. Open ocean velocities are v high
(100-200 kph or even more) and amplitudes low, and speed drop and
height rises as depth drops. There are std depth/height/speed formulae
available. The Kaikoura trench is an anomaly. You have deep ocean
depths in a slot with continental shelf either side. How that shapes
and directs a wave and how fast/slow / high is utterly beyond me.

5 minutes warning should save most people affected.
2 minutes warning helps heaps if you are alert.
In Samoa tens of seconds was enough for some.


             Russell




On 6 March 2011 15:51, Oli Glaser <EraseMEoli.glaserspamspamspamBeGonetalktalk.net> wrote:
{Quote hidden}

>

2011\03\06@120349 by Oli Glaser

flavicon
face
On 06/03/2011 08:27, RussellMc wrote:
{Quote hidden}

That makes sense - I suppose a tsunami might be a little easier to deal with than an earthquake, given (as you mention) you at least know roughly where it's coming from (i.e from the sea) and how far inland it may travel.
Would be interesting to know what the experts predict (or are even aware of) for the Kaikoura trench scenario - probably a combination of smaller scale models and computer simulations might help to give at least some idea, though I'm sure there would be some serious work involved.


2011\03\06@153831 by N. T.

picon face
N. T. wrote:
> RussellMc wrote:
>> Another estimated 5.x aftershock just hit a few minutes ago.
>
> Looking at Google map, I'd suggest that new Greendale Fault line aims
> at  Kaikoura Canyon. It makes impression that the fragment between
> Christchurch and  Kaikoura slides down north over the canyon. Probably
> scientists have developed the model of the process.
>

http://www.christchurchquakemap.co.nz
4.9M, depth: 12km 6/3/2011 16:43 (NZ time) - close to Kaikoura

2011\03\06@163424 by RussellMc

face picon face
>> Looking at Google map, I'd suggest that new Greendale Fault line aims
>> at  Kaikoura Canyon. It makes impression that the fragment between
>> Christchurch and  Kaikoura slides down north over the canyon. Probably
>> scientists have developed the model of the process.

> http://www.christchurchquakemap.co.nz
> 4.9M, depth: 12km 6/3/2011 16:43 (NZ time) - close to Kaikoura

Go to that page.
Click the "zoom out" button 4 times.
Note the "trench" on either side of the South Island and where it
leaves the country.
Wonder again about the possible relationship to Greendale fault and
Kaikoura trench.
(That's the "plate edge" you can see.)

This will be completely familiar to the experts.
What they conclude or how much we hear at populist level is tbd.


            Russell McMahon

2011\03\06@171405 by IVP

face picon face
My friend's sister in Christchurch told her yesterday that she'd been
without water since the quake. Had to travel quite a distance daily
to refill bottles, have a shower, use the toilet and so on. Costly and
very inconvenient

Until she found out on Saturday afternoon that her roadside neighbour
up the common drive had turned everybody else's water off "just in
case"

He couldn't explain "just in case" and is not popular, particularly as
he'd seen residents coming and going but did not turn the water
back on or even say anything. He, by the way, did not turn his own
water off, which his irate neighbours are rather hoping he chokes on
or drowns in

Joe

2011\03\07@054242 by N. T.

picon face
RussellMc wrote:
>
> This will be completely familiar to the experts.
> What they conclude or how much we hear at populist level is tbd.
>

I don't think there is much sense in getting deeper in the topic. If
you had said in your first post about the Kaikoura Canyon, that there
was a 4+M shake in the region, I, most probably had avoided the
prediction.  The idea of it is on the surface, get the timespan
between first 2 quakes to calculate the third. Just a speculation,
probably is not the best thing to be posted on the public forum,
sorry

2011\03\10@032657 by IVP

face picon face
> Natural disasters *always* bring out the *best* in people !

I heard on the talkback tonight -

Out of the mouths of dotty old women

"I reckon it's NASA's fault. Every time they put something up
it shakes the ground. Since 1959 there've been more and more
earthquakes and volcanoes going off"

Unswayable under host questioning

Jo

2011\03\21@065519 by N. T.

picon face
RussellMc wrote:
>
>  A Tsunami is essentially a step change in incoming water velocity -
> NOT a normal wave. Once you see what they do and how they work you can
> have a fair idea what you need to do in a given case.
>
> Arrival time would need expert input. Open ocean velocities are v high
> (100-200 kph or even more) and amplitudes low, and speed drop and
> height rises as depth drops. There are std depth/height/speed formulae
> available.

That's a good point. Some mid-ocean ridge is able to generate a
serious tsunami for Christchurch. Generated as far as at Pitcairn or
even Ester Islands, the tsunami would reach Hikurangi Plateau, then
bounded by North Island and Chatham Rise, it could affect the Chch
area.

More... (looser matching)
- Last day of these posts
- In 2011 , 2012 only
- Today
- New search...