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'[EE] Patent Process Duration in the US'
2006\04\13@113249 by Tim N9PUZ

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Does anyone have recent experience with receiving a hardware or
process patent? I was curious how long it took from initial
application to issue. An attorney we know said recently that quite a
few are stretching out to 4-5 years or more.

Tim

2006\04\13@114653 by Bob Axtell

face picon face
Tim N9PUZ wrote:

>Does anyone have recent experience with receiving a hardware or
>process patent? I was curious how long it took from initial
>application to issue. An attorney we know said recently that quite a
>few are stretching out to 4-5 years or more.
>
>Tim
>  
>
I applied for my patents in the late 70's and early 80's. Both took more
than 2 years THEN.

--Bob

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2006\04\13@120615 by Cris Wilson

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At 10:33 AM 4/13/2006 -0500, you wrote:
>Does anyone have recent experience with receiving a hardware or
>process patent? I was curious how long it took from initial
>application to issue. An attorney we know said recently that quite a
>few are stretching out to 4-5 years or more.

The last hardware patent I received (in 2005) took 3 years.
I filed the patent application, 6 months later I received word that the
application had been accepted and was under review. 1.5 years later
one of my friends told me that they found my approved patent while doing
a search for a related design. I called the patent office to see what was
going on, they said that they would look into it. 2 months later, the patent
office notified me that the patent had been approved.
So I could easily see it taking 4 to 5 years for the patent office to
notify you
of approval.
_____________________________________________________________
Cris Wilson
Information Resource Consultant
College of Architecture, Arts, and Humanities
Clemson University
.....crisKILLspamspam@spam@clemson.edu
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2006\04\13@123511 by Timothy Weber

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Tim N9PUZ wrote:
> Does anyone have recent experience with receiving a hardware or
> process patent? I was curious how long it took from initial
> application to issue. An attorney we know said recently that quite a
> few are stretching out to 4-5 years or more.

That's about right for the few software patents I've been involved with.

(Not to mention the time and money involved in initial application.)
--
Timothy J. Weber
http://timothyweber.org

2006\04\13@130956 by olin piclist

face picon face
Tim N9PUZ wrote:
> Does anyone have recent experience with receiving a hardware or
> process patent? I was curious how long it took from initial
> application to issue. An attorney we know said recently that quite a
> few are stretching out to 4-5 years or more.

My last patent that has gone all the way thru the process took about 3 years
from first filing to issue (hardware for spacial subdivision to accellerate
ray tracing).  I have another patent currently about 11 months since first
filing and haven't heard anything other than the usual confirmations that
the paperwork was received.

By the way, Dave Tweed is the other co-inventor on this one, which has to do
with controlling switching power supplies, including PFC, without ever
measuring current.  Digital computation is used to infer current from other
measurements.  We can do full power factor corrected input by only measuring
the input and output voltages and then doing some computation in a micro.
Another cool part is that similar digital computation can be applied to
regulate the output voltage of a PFC supply more tightly than the
traditional approach that just low pass filters the output control response
to not defeat the PFC function.  This means we can replace large and
expensive electronics like bulk capacitors and current senses with ever
cheaper computational power.

The proof of concept prototype used an early 30F2010.


******************************************************************
Embed Inc, Littleton Massachusetts, (978) 742-9014.  #1 PIC
consultant in 2004 program year.  http://www.embedinc.com/products

2006\04\13@134330 by Bob Axtell

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Olin Lathrop wrote:

{Quote hidden}

Is that what you plan to speak on at Masters'?

Looks good, Olin.

--Bob

>The proof of concept prototype used an early 30F2010.
>
>
>******************************************************************
>Embed Inc, Littleton Massachusetts, (978) 742-9014.  #1 PIC
>consultant in 2004 program year.  http://www.embedinc.com/products
>  
>


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2006\04\13@141438 by olin piclist

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> Is that what you plan to speak on at Masters'?

No.  My Masters course is about using 10Fs as switching power supply
controllers.  This is the other end of the spectrum from doing fancy
computation for a power supply.

The 10F204 is a great little power supply controller.  It has a time base,
comparator with internal absolute voltage reference, nice clean on/off
digital outputs, and enough pins to allow for an enable input and power good
output.  The advantage of software control is you can perform special
startup logic, guarantee the switch on time is always within some bounds,
etc.  The $.50 price of a 10F versus the $2.00 price of an analog switcher
chip more than makes up for having to add the pass element.  Some switcher
controllers don't have one either.  In a lot of cases, the pass element only
costs $.05-$.20.  You can also make various tradeoffs in the firmware to
taylor the supply to quick response to sudden load, good efficiency,
tweaking both pulse width and frequency on the fly, etc.  Switching
frequencies of 100KHz are readily attainable.  After all, that's a whole 10
instructions per loop.


******************************************************************
Embed Inc, Littleton Massachusetts, (978) 742-9014.  #1 PIC
consultant in 2004 program year.  http://www.embedinc.com/products

2006\04\13@150705 by John Pearson

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face
My patent application last year took about 9 months. There are a few fast
tracks you can petition the office for that will move your app to the top of
the pile. Mine were potential energy savings and potential environmental
protection. Others are that you have a terminal illness, over 60 years old
and a couple others.


{Original Message removed}

2006\04\13@154817 by Wouter van Ooijen

face picon face
> The 10F204 is a great little power supply controller.  It has
> a time base, comparator with internal *absolute* voltage reference

Nice! I had not noticed that yet. But alas, the accuracy is TBD :(  :(
:(

Wouter van Ooijen

-- -------------------------------------------
Van Ooijen Technische Informatica: http://www.voti.nl
consultancy, development, PICmicro products
docent Hogeschool van Utrecht: http://www.voti.nl/hvu


2006\04\13@172930 by William Chops Westfield

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>> Does anyone have recent experience with receiving a hardware or
>> process patent? I was curious how long it took from initial
>> application to issue. An attorney we know said recently that quite a
>> few are stretching out to 4-5 years or more.
>>
I have three patents in the last 5 years or so that were granted
after about three years, and one that is still "pending" after
four years.  (the last being the most interesting one, of course.)

BillW

2006\04\14@073603 by Vasile Surducan

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On 4/13/06, Wouter van Ooijen <EraseMEwouterspam_OUTspamTakeThisOuTvoti.nl> wrote:
> > The 10F204 is a great little power supply controller.  It has
> > a time base, comparator with internal *absolute* voltage reference
>
> Nice! I had not noticed that yet. But alas, the accuracy is TBD :(  :(
> :(

Compared with other PICs where reference was a poor switched network
supplied from Vdd, 10F204 is indeed a "patented" device because it has
a band-gap reference (which seems is used also for OSCAL).
But indeed there is no accurate comparator (talking about large
offset) inside of old PICS, maybe in newers who knows ?

greetings,
Vasile

>
> Wouter van Ooijen
>
> -- -------------------------------------------
> Van Ooijen Technische Informatica: http://www.voti.nl
> consultancy, development, PICmicro products
> docent Hogeschool van Utrecht: http://www.voti.nl/hvu
>
>
> -

2006\04\14@101655 by alan smith

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I'll let you know....I just signed the paperwork on a patent application by one of my clients....how nice that he included me.  Of course....it was his idea, but I implemented it for him.

Timothy Weber <twspamspam_OUTtimothyweber.org> wrote:  Tim N9PUZ wrote:
> Does anyone have recent experience with receiving a hardware or
> process patent? I was curious how long it took from initial
> application to issue. An attorney we know said recently that quite a
> few are stretching out to 4-5 years or more.

That's about right for the few software patents I've been involved with.

(Not to mention the time and money involved in initial application.)
--
Timothy J. Weber
http://timothyweber.org

2006\04\14@104828 by Timothy Weber

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Patrick Murphy wrote:
>
> Patent examiners have a set amount of time--an average of 20 to 30
> hours for computer software and hardware--to review a patent, handling
> any appeals and updates from the applicants as well, before issuing a
> final approval or rejection, says Robert Budens, president of the
> Patent Office Professional Association that represents examiners.
>
> That time frame, Budens says, has not changed since 1976, despite
> added procedural complexity and accelerating technological
> advancement. If examiners exceed the time limits, they lose their
> jobs.

I talked with a former patent examiner recently, and he says it's even
worse than that: examiners have a quota of patents *granted*.  Not
processed (could be granted or denied) - granted.  "We are in the
business of granting patents, not denying patents" some supervisor was
quoted as saying.

Which goes a long way in explaining the number of obvious and/or
non-novel patents.
--
Timothy J. Weber
http://timothyweber.org

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