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'[EE] LPC1111 ARM Cortex questions'
2011\07\10@111553 by Jason White

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hello everyone, I am thinking of moving into 32 bit processors. I was
thinking of using the
LPC1114FBD48<http://www.nxp.com/#/pip/pip=[pip=LPC1114FBD48]%7Cpp=[t=pip,i=LPC1114FBD48]>however
I find myself rather confused when reading its datasheets and I find
myself with a few questions. Feel free to shout at me and call me names
since it probably is buried somewhere within the documentation.

1) How do you program it ? it seems to hint at to have a built in bootloader
2) what are the JTAG pinouts ? I dont see anything that mentions it
3) What would be a "better" ARM processor to start out with. Since I only
chose this one simply for its cost.

-- Jason White - Python / C++ Programmer and Electronics Hobbyis

2011\07\10@211314 by Brent Brown

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On 10 Jul 2011 at 11:15, Jason White wrote:
> hello everyone, I am thinking of moving into 32 bit processors. I
> was thinking of using the
> LPC1114FBD48<http://www.nxp.com/#/pip/pip=[pip=LPC1114FBD48]%7Cpp=[t=
> pip,i=LPC1114FBD48]>however I find myself rather confused when
> reading its datasheets and I find myself with a few questions. Feel
> free to shout at me and call me names since it probably is buried
> somewhere within the documentation.
>
> 1) How do you program it ? it seems to hint at to have a built in bootloader
> 2) what are the JTAG pinouts ? I dont see anything that mentions it
> 3) What would be a "better" ARM processor to start out with. Since I only
> chose this one simply for its cost.

It may well have a bootloader factory programmed into it, but looks like you might have to search outside of the datasheet for info on that.

Data sheet talks about Serial Wire Debug (SWD) but not JTAG. Two pins for this, SWDIO and SWCLK. Perhaps it's a derivative of JTAG, I don't know.

This device should be as simple as any to get started with, no doubt easier if you use an off the shelf dev kit like one of these which seem cheap enough... http://ics.nxp.com/lpcxpresso/~LPC1114/

I'm just barely getting started with ARM, going with an Olimex LPC-2378STK dev kit I bought a couple of years ago but just switched on last week. I'm not even at flashing an LED stage yet, there is quite a learning curve in the tool chain setup etc.
-- Brent Brown, Electronic Design Solutions
16 English Street, St Andrews,
Hamilton 3200, New Zealand
Ph: +64 7 849 0069
Fax: +64 7 849 0071
Cell: +64 27 433 4069
eMail:  spam_OUTbrent.brownTakeThisOuTspamclear.net.nz

2011\07\10@215931 by Xiaofan Chen

face picon face
On Mon, Jul 11, 2011 at 9:13 AM, Brent Brown <.....brent.brownKILLspamspam@spam@clear.net.nz> wrote:
> On 10 Jul 2011 at 11:15, Jason White wrote:
>> hello everyone, I am thinking of moving into 32 bit processors. I
>> was thinking of using the
>> LPC1114FBD48<http://www.nxp.com/#/pip/pip=[pip=LPC1114FBD48]%7Cpp=[t=
>> pip,i=LPC1114FBD48]>however I find myself rather confused when
>> reading its datasheets and I find myself with a few questions. Feel
>> free to shout at me and call me names since it probably is buried
>> somewhere within the documentation.

You may want to go through the user manual as well. The datasheet
concentrates on the electrical specifications.

User manual has more information.
http://ics.nxp.com/support/documents/microcontrollers/pdf/user.manual.lpc11xx.lpc11cxx.pdf

>> 1) How do you program it ? it seems to hint at to have a built in bootloader
>> 2) what are the JTAG pinouts ? I dont see anything that mentions it
>> 3) What would be a "better" ARM processor to start out with. Since I only
>> chose this one simply for its cost.
>
> It may well have a bootloader factory programmed into it, but looks like you might
> have to search outside of the datasheet for info on that.

Yes. It is documented in the user manual.
You can program using Flash Magic.
http://www.flashmagictool.com/

> Data sheet talks about Serial Wire Debug (SWD) but not JTAG. Two pins for this,
> SWDIO and SWCLK. Perhaps it's a derivative of JTAG, I don't know.

It is documented in the user manual, SWD is not JTAG.
http://www.arm.com/products/system-ip/debug-trace/coresight-soc-components/serial-wire-debug.php

You can use SWD for debugging and programming.

> This device should be as simple as any to get started with, no doubt easier if you
> use an off the shelf dev kit like one of these which seem cheap enough...
> http://ics.nxp.com/lpcxpresso/~LPC1114/

Yes I just got one free. I have not played with it yet. The IDE actually works
under both Windows and Linux.

Its code size limit of 128KB is more than enough for the NXP Cotex M0
parts.
support.code-red-tech.com/CodeRedWiki/ProductOverview
http://ics.nxp.com/support/lpcxpresso/#FAQ

On the other hand, this one locks you to the Code Red IDE which
you may or may not like.

So other boards are also worth considering, like this one
from Olimex (Euro 11.95). You need a SWD capable debugger
though. And open source solution like OpenOCD does not
yet support SWD yet (on the way).
http://www.olimex.com/dev/lpc-p1114.html
http://sourceforge.net/apps/trac/libswd

> I'm just barely getting started with ARM, going with an Olimex LPC-2378STK dev kit
> I bought a couple of years ago but just switched on last week. I'm not even at
> flashing an LED stage yet, there is quite a learning curve in the tool chain setup etc.

That is much more powerful than the LPC1114 (Cortex M0). The
board has all the goodies like Ethernet, USB, 2x CAN, 2xRS232, ETHERNET,
SD/MMC, AUDIO IN/OUT.


-- Xiaofa

2011\07\11@061733 by Michael Watterson

face picon face
On 11/07/2011 02:13, Brent Brown wrote:
> This device should be as simple as any to get started with, no doubt easier if you
> use an off the shelf dev kit like one of these which seem cheap enough...
> http://ics.nxp.com/lpcxpresso/~LPC1114/

I'd go for lpcexpresso or a high end arm dev kit with Linux. I've used ARM dev kits  both Marvell PXA255 (ultra compact 3.5" touch screen)  and Samsung 6400 based (large board with 4"+ 800x480 touch screen LCD) with Linux. A low cost route might be a ARM based router that has GPIO ports accessible on PCB and running OpenWRT as a Linux platform. For Real Time applications though QNX maybe better.

The big advantage of ARM is when you have enough RAM, Flash and Clock speed to run Linux and off the shelf Linux / C libraries.  I looked at Cortex M0 and it seemed to me that for low volume or Hobby usage a PIC18F with JAL or Assembler is handier. Or 10F/14F/16F for low pin count.

I think though the more powerful ARM Cortex a good alternative to PIC32, but only for C programming.


It depends what your goal is.

2011\07\11@162416 by Jason White

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What would you all consider a good line of arm processors that has JTAG or a
similar standard protocol that I could work with on linux

2011\07\11@165920 by Jason White

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also what are the requirements to run a vary basic linux distro eg. DMA & >
100 MIPs ?

-- Jason White - Python & C++ Programmer and Electronics Hobbyis

2011\07\14@110120 by Brendan Gillatt

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On 11/07/11 21:18, Jason White wrote:
> What would you all consider a good line of arm processors that has JTAG or a
> similar standard protocol that I could work with on linux.

ST's STM32 line of Cortex-M3 processors are well supported on Linux (and
will even run Linux in a sortof painful, not-applicable way). They have
a serial bootloader built in--all that is needed to program them is a
serial port or usb->serial converter. JTAG is also supported through
OpenOCD.

Regards,
Brendan
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2011\07\14@221842 by Daniel Serpell

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Hi,

On Mon, Jul 11, 2011 at 4:18 PM, Jason White
<whitewaterssoftwareinfospamKILLspamgmail.com> wrote:
> What would you all consider a good line of arm processors that has JTAG or a
> similar standard protocol that I could work with on linux.

See the olimex LPC-P1343 board, at: http://www.olimex.com/dev/lpc-p1343.html

You can download a simple tutorial for programming the board on Linux from:
 http://gnudd.com/pub/cortex-m3/cortex-m3-v2011-04-23.tar.gz

On Mon, Jul 11, 2011 at 4:51 PM, Jason White
<.....whitewaterssoftwareinfoKILLspamspam.....gmail.com> wrote:
> also what are the requirements to run a vary basic linux distro eg. DMA & >
> 100 MIPs ?

For running "real" Linux, you need an ARM cpu with memory management unit (MMU),
so it's ARM9, ARM11, Cortex A8 or better, with more than about 16MB of ram.

If you want to play with embeded Linux, you can try the firiendly-arm mini2440:
http://www.andahammer.com/mini35-sdk/

They also sell a complete "learning kit" with a book and CD.

   Daniel

2011\07\14@233302 by Jason White

picon face
So lets say I wanted to build an arm based linux board. Using an atmel
ARM processor* with 256mb of external addressing space. What exactly
do I need to do to run a bare minimum linux installation ?

heres what I'm guessing:
64mb of ram, hooked up to the DMA
384mb of flash (with linux) on the DMA
Internal flash: a program that copies segments from the external flash
into ram and executes it ?

*AT91SAM7S161-AU - http://www.atmel.com/dyn/resources/prod_documents/doc6175.pdf


-- Jason White - Python / C++ Programmer and Electronics Hobbyis

2011\07\15@013744 by Xiaofan Chen

face picon face
On Fri, Jul 15, 2011 at 11:33 AM, Jason White
<EraseMEwhitewaterssoftwareinfospam_OUTspamTakeThisOuTgmail.com> wrote:
> So lets say I wanted to build an arm based linux board. Using an atmel
> ARM processor* with 256mb of external addressing space. What exactly
> do I need to do to run a bare minimum linux installation ?
>
> heres what I'm guessing:
> 64mb of ram, hooked up to the DMA
> 384mb of flash (with linux) on the DMA
> Internal flash: a program that copies segments from the external flash
> into ram and executes it ?
>
> *AT91SAM7S161-AU - http://www.atmel.com/dyn/resources/prod_documents/doc6175.pdf
>

Read the datasheet carefully and see why it does not support
Linux or even uCLinux: It does not support external memory.
It also does not an MMU to run full Linux (you can run
uCLinux without the MMU).

You need something like this to run full-fledged Linux.
http://www.olimex.com/dev/sam9-L9260.html

Or something like this to run uCLinux.
http://www.olimex.com/dev/lpc-e2468.html

The following two are host now if you want to run Linux.
http://beagleboard.org/
http://www.pandaboard.org/ (I wish I have one of this).

-- Xiaofa

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