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'[EE] Flux Fume Extraction'
2006\10\17@053029 by Forrest Christian

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I'm having a bit of a problem with indoor air pollution from flux-fumes
and am trying to figure out what to do about it.

In short, I'm finding that the small production runs I'm doing are large
enough that the flux fumes from the bulk soldering (solder pot and/or
reflow oven) are bad enough that I need to do something about them.  
Both methods tend to put a lot of fumes in the air over a short period
of time - and spread over a fairly large area when compared to say hand
soldering a board.

I'm pretty certain I either need a fume hood or some sort of other fume
extraction device....

I'm trying to figure out what options don't suck....  Well, maybe I do
want something which sucks, but you know what I mean :)

Some of the fume extractors out there look interesting, but they're
pricey and I'm not sure they would work for this application.  And I
don't really want to spend $1500 for something which sucks in a bad way...

A fume hood looks like a good choice to extract the fumes, assuming they
work...  but then I end up putting my soldering pot and/or reflow oven
*in* the fume hood, and let the fume hood suck heat away from the
solder, etc.

I've even considered some DIY options such as taking a range hood and
adding some serious filtration to it.

I'd really like some ideas of what has worked for others in the past.  

Also,  It seems like I've been asking a lot of "small production run"
questions lately.   While these aren't completely off-topic, is there a
better place (different email list perhaps?) for these types of discussions?

-forrest

2006\10\17@055237 by Bob Axtell

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Forrest Christian wrote:
{Quote hidden}

My brother always ran this end of things. The buildings we leased had a
rolling back door, so when we
fired up all the soldering stuff, we ran it out the back door so that it
was half in / half out. A fan blew
the fumes outside and into the Air Force base next door (in the USA,
there is always an Air Force base
next door). Nobody ever noticed.

--Bob

> Also,  It seems like I've been asking a lot of "small production run"
> questions lately.   While these aren't completely off-topic, is there a
> better place (different email list perhaps?) for these types of discussions?
>
> -forrest
>
>  

2006\10\17@084057 by Victor Fraenckel

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How about looking into the dust extractors that tool stores like
Sears/Craftsman here in the US sell for home shops? I expect that this
sort of thing is availabl;e in most countries and are marketed to the
home craftman. Just a thought!

BTW: There is no Air Force base within 50 miles of my home ;>{ ). Myth
BUSTED!!!!!

HTH

Vic

*____________________________________________________________________________________________*

*Victor Fraenckel
KC2GUI
victorf ATSIGN windreader DOT com**
*



2006\10\17@141353 by Dwayne Reid

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At 03:30 AM 10/17/2006, Forrest Christian wrote:
>I'm having a bit of a problem with indoor air pollution from flux-fumes
>and am trying to figure out what to do about it.
>
>I've even considered some DIY options such as taking a range hood and
>adding some serious filtration to it.

Can you get a vent line to the outside?  If so, the range-hood trick
is the easiest and most likely least expensive method
available.  Keep in mind that most range hoods need only a 3" or 4"
flexible plastic duct line which is extremely inexpensive.

We've got a small wave-solder machine (12") that is vented to the
outside with an 8 inch metal duct line.  I've got the blower fans
installed in a wooden box mounted to the inside surface of the
outside wall - just before the vent louvers.  The fans (2 of them)
are 10" Rotron fans removed from old DEC PDP computer racks.  The
whole thing didn't cost more than a hundred bucks and a few hours of
time.  No solder fumes noticeable while the wave-solder is running.

dwayne

--
Dwayne Reid   <spam_OUTdwaynerTakeThisOuTspamplanet.eon.net>
Trinity Electronics Systems Ltd    Edmonton, AB, CANADA
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