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'[EE] Cats chewing on cords'
2006\07\23@135947 by Lindy Mayfield

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Please accept my apologies if this should be OT, I wasn't sure.

In the past my cats have chewed through a few network cables which aren't cheap.  And yesterday I just noticed they chewed up a Nokia charger (wall wart) and rendered it completely useless.  Those are only DC a few volts.  I'd stick my tongue across the wires if I didn't have a Voltmeter.  (-:

For their water supply they have a little fountain that filters and pumps the water.  This is connected directly to mains (220VAC) and I noticed it had been chewed a bit so that a little wire was exposed.

Then I started to get worried.  There are many things plugged in all the time in my house.  What is the risk to the cats if they chew on a live wire?  I've seen National Lampoon's Christmas Vacation where the cat chews through the Christmas tree cord and gets fried.  I'm hoping that is fiction.  
Anyone with experience with this?  I love my cats, could one of them actually die from this?

Anyone know how to prevent this if it is a hazard?  I've tried cayenne pepper before on the network cable but it didn't help much.  Just guessing, but maybe make a paste of cayenne and water and then paint it on the wires?  
I've been 3 years with one cat without any incident with mains wires and 1 year with 5 cats since kittens without it, but seeing bare wire on a wire direct to mains scared me.  My cats are my family and I'd never forgive myself if something happend that could have been prevented.

Thanks very much in advance for any help you might share with me on this matter.

Best regards,
Lindy


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2006\07\23@141253 by Martin Klingensmith

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Cats generally do what they want, but do you have toys or something that
may distract them from chewing cords?
I would be surprised if your local pet store doesn't have something with
the intention of stopping this behavior.
There must certainly be something so distasteful to felines that they
will leave your cords alone.
As far as getting hurt is concerned, I think it is quite possible that
the cat could be killed.
--
Martin K

Lindy Mayfield wrote:

{Quote hidden}

2006\07\23@144217 by Gus S Calabrese

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There is no yucky tasting treatment that will work.
My friend has tried them all.  ( and I mean all of them )
Your best bet is to armor the cables.


There are many products that will work.
My friend used aluminum tape to wrap her cables.  That stopped the
cats and looks ugly.  There is spiral armor tat will work.
metal is best.

see http://www.oh-god.com/kittyarmor
1/2 emt flex conduit is cheap
AGSC


On 2006-Jul 23, at 11:59hrs AM, Lindy Mayfield wrote:

Please accept my apologies if this should be OT, I wasn't sure.

In the past my cats have chewed through a few network cables which  
aren't cheap.  And yesterday I just noticed they chewed up a Nokia  
charger (wall wart) and rendered it completely useless.  Those are  
only DC a few volts.  I'd stick my tongue across the wires if I  
didn't have a Voltmeter.  (-:

For their water supply they have a little fountain that filters and  
pumps the water.  This is connected directly to mains (220VAC) and I  
noticed it had been chewed a bit so that a little wire was exposed.

Then I started to get worried.  There are many things plugged in all  
the time in my house.  What is the risk to the cats if they chew on a  
live wire?  I've seen National Lampoon's Christmas Vacation where the  
cat chews through the Christmas tree cord and gets fried.  I'm hoping  
that is fiction.

Anyone with experience with this?  I love my cats, could one of them  
actually die from this?

Anyone know how to prevent this if it is a hazard?  I've tried  
cayenne pepper before on the network cable but it didn't help much.  
Just guessing, but maybe make a paste of cayenne and water and then  
paint it on the wires?

I've been 3 years with one cat without any incident with mains wires  
and 1 year with 5 cats since kittens without it, but seeing bare wire  
on a wire direct to mains scared me.  My cats are my family and I'd  
never forgive myself if something happend that could have been  
prevented.

Thanks very much in advance for any help you might share with me on  
this matter.

Best regards,
Lindy
<winmail.dat>

2006\07\23@150648 by Martin K

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If you have an area with many cables such as an entertainment center or
computer desk / workbench, you could run the wires through a
wiremold-type trough that would have the side-effect of making the place
look organized. I have one at my workbench.
--
Martin

Gus S Calabrese wrote:
{Quote hidden}

2006\07\23@161300 by Wouter van Ooijen

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> Ever made a pizza at home on aluminium foil and had a bit of
> it stick to the bottom of the pizza?
> I don't know why but my teeth can sense the smallest amount of it.
> Good idea!  I think the cat's teeth are probably similar.  
> Ugly wires are better than a deat cat (best friend, etc).

IIRC they are not the same in what makes alu 'taste' so bad: they don't
contain any lead (Pb)!

Wouter van Ooijen

-- -------------------------------------------
Van Ooijen Technische Informatica: http://www.voti.nl
consultancy, development, PICmicro products
docent Hogeschool van Utrecht: http://www.voti.nl/hvu


2006\07\23@164227 by Richard Prosser

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Lindy
How about training a dog to keep them away from the cables?

I know at one time that "essense of tabasco sauce" was used to stop
animals eating fibre optic cables in Canada ?  but if the cayenne
pepper didn't work then I guess this won't.
Probably better to try & find something more attractive for them to play with.

Or maybe a dummy cable with a high voltage/low current (static
charge?)  on it would give them enough of a scare to stop them doing
it. (the electric fence effect). I used a homemade electric fence to
stop our dog from digging under the wooden one. Only had to use it for
about a week.

RP

On 24/07/06, Wouter van Ooijen <spam_OUTwouterTakeThisOuTspamvoti.nl> wrote:
{Quote hidden}

> -

2006\07\23@183324 by James Newtons Massmind

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> Then I started to get worried.  There are many things plugged
> in all the time in my house.  What is the risk to the cats if
> they chew on a live wire?  I've seen National Lampoon's
> Christmas Vacation where the cat chews through the Christmas
> tree cord and gets fried.  I'm hoping that is fiction.  
>
> Anyone with experience with this?  I love my cats, could one
> of them actually die from this?

My wife's ex-husband lost a kitten when it chewed through the power cord to
his alarm radio. Low quality or softer plastics seem the most interesting to
them.  To some degree, nature selects for the ones who don't chew on power
cords, so it is not a common issue as far as I know.

> Anyone know how to prevent this if it is a hazard?  I've
> tried cayenne pepper before on the network cable but it
> didn't help much.  Just guessing, but maybe make a paste of
> cayenne and water and then paint it on the wires?  

Cinnamon or peppermint oil. But it has to be the VERY strong stuff that
burns if you get it on you.

> I've been 3 years with one cat without any incident with
> mains wires and 1 year with 5 cats since kittens without it,
> but seeing bare wire on a wire direct to mains scared me.  My
> cats are my family and I'd never forgive myself if something
> happend that could have been prevented.

8 cats. Yes, I'm insane.

> Thanks very much in advance for any help you might share with
> me on this matter.
>
> Best regards,
> Lindy
>

---
James.


2006\07\23@183532 by James Newtons Massmind

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> I spend a LOT of money on scratching posts and cats things,
> and I even intentionally put bird feeders next to the windows.  
>
> you're right, you can't "discipline" a cat. )-:

Actually, you can, but only if you do it from around a corner were the cat
can figure out that it is you doing it. I've trained out a few nasty
behaviors with a good quality squirt gun hidden some distance away...

If they figure out it's you and not the "hand of God" they just go poop in
your shoes and call it even.

---
James.



2006\07\23@184134 by Zik Saleeba

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I know this problem well - many a beautifully made cable in my house
has suffered from cat attack. Personally I never did much better than
chasing the cats away when I caught them at it.

I've heard of chili oil being painted on the wires as a deterrent - my
mother claims to have had good results from this. If your cats are
immune to cayenne this may not work as well for them - but hey it's
worth a try if it saves your cats from a shock.

Cheers,
Zik

On 24/07/06, Lindy Mayfield <.....lindy.mayfieldKILLspamspam@spam@ssf.sas.com> wrote:
{Quote hidden}

> -

2006\07\23@193559 by olin piclist

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Lindy Mayfield wrote:
> What is the risk to the cats if they chew on a
> live wire?

Think about what could happen to you if you chewed thru the insulation on
the same live wire.  Depending on exactly what got touched to what, the
result could range from a nasty painful shock, to jaw muscle contractions
with teeth cracked and inability to let go until mouth burned off or cardiac
arrest after extended excruciating pain, to out of spec current thru part of
the brain resulting in convultion, loss of life support functions, and 9
lives used up within 8.3mS.

> Anyone know how to prevent this if it is a hazard?

Probably not too much of a hazard to your house.  A cat contains a lot of
water, and is probably hard to start of fire.  However the behavior is
self-limiting.  I'm quite sure it would not happen more often than once/cat.


******************************************************************
Embed Inc, Littleton Massachusetts, (978) 742-9014.  #1 PIC
consultant in 2004 program year.  http://www.embedinc.com/products

2006\07\23@194637 by Mike Hord

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> Anyone with experience with this?  I love my cats, could one of them actually die from this?


Probably.  A cousin's dog chewed through a cable once and got some
pretty awful burns.  A cat's much smaller.

You COULD try a product called Bitter Apple.  It tastes awful- wash
your hands well, ten or twelve times, after applying.  Probably won't
work, though.

I've always wondered if the most effective means mightn't be to smear
tuna juice on a particular cable with a very sophisticated
anti-dead-cat mechanism, that would still deliver a good jolt.  Let
the cat get a couple of VERY nasty shocks on its tongue in a situation
that guarantees its safety, and figure that cats learn at least as
fast as humans about electric shock.

After all, I've always found it VERY hard to touch an object once it
has shocked me a good one, even when I'm sure I've isolated and fixed
the problem...

Mike H.

2006\07\23@201310 by Jinx

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Maybe you could experiment with electronic devices

http://www.rspb.org.uk/advice/unwantedvisitors/cats/catdeterrent.asp

I've seen a news item about a PIR system that detects cats
approaching areas of the garden where they shouldn'ta oughtn'ta
be and sprays them. The water bit won't be practical inside, but
you might be able to make a deterrent noise and/or movement
machine. It would have to be very local and minimal so as to not
traumatise kitty too much

2006\07\24@003511 by Gus S Calabrese

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On 2006-Jul 23, at 17:46hrs PM, Mike Hord wrote:

> Anyone with experience with this?  I love my cats, could one of  
> them actually die from this?


Probably.  A cousin's dog chewed through a cable once and got some
pretty awful burns.  A cat's much smaller.

You COULD try a product called Bitter Apple.  It tastes awful- wash
your hands well, ten or twelve times, after applying.  Probably won't
work, though.

I've always wondered if the most effective means mightn't be to smear
tuna juice on a particular cable with a very sophisticated
anti-dead-cat mechanism, that would still deliver a good jolt.  Let
the cat get a couple of VERY nasty shocks on its tongue in a situation
that guarantees its safety, and figure that cats learn at least as
fast as humans about electric shock.

After all, I've always found it VERY hard to touch an object once it
has shocked me a good one, even when I'm sure I've isolated and fixed
the problem...

Mike H.

0000000000000000000000000000000
so maybe one could take all cable bundles and add a bare wire that
delivers a current limited 200V jolt once per 10 seconds.
Is it possible to detect cat mouth slobber on wire and trigger jolt ?

2006\07\24@032929 by Luis.Moreira

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Hi Lindy,
I had the same problem with my dog and here in the UK you can buy a
spray that definitely does the job, any pet shop will have it. I don't
know how it tastes but it does smell horrible. Next time I have to go to
the pet shop I will try to find out the name.
Your Vets should have this kind of thing...
Best regards
               Luis



{Original Message removed}

2006\07\24@045636 by Alan B. Pearce

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>Anyone with experience with this?  I love my cats, could
>one of them actually die from this?
>
>Anyone know how to prevent this if it is a hazard?  I've tried
>cayenne pepper before on the network cable but it didn't help
>much.  Just guessing, but maybe make a paste of cayenne and
>water and then paint it on the wires?

My bet would be that the cats are just plain bored. What else do they have
to occupy them?

I know our cats will chase film canisters around the floor, the small ones
35mm film comes in, and with a few beads or similar in them to make them
rattle they become more interesting.

2006\07\24@054453 by Philip Pemberton

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Gus S Calabrese wrote:
> Is it possible to detect cat mouth slobber on wire and trigger jolt ?

Resistance checking. Use a low-voltage AC signal to measure the resistance
between the two wires. Once the cat's teeth pierce the wire, the cat's saliva
will bridge the two wires, and the resistance will go down FAST.

Doing it without breaking the wire? Two bits of metal wire, one on each side
of the cable. Cat chews cable, resistance goes down. Same principle, different
implementation.

--
Phil.                         | Kitsune: Acorn RiscPC SA202 64M+6G ViewFinder
philpemspamKILLspamdsl.pipex.com         | Cheetah: Athlon64 3200+ A8VDeluxeV2 512M+100G
http://www.philpem.me.uk/     | Tiger: Toshiba SatPro4600 Celeron700 256M+40G

2006\07\24@055427 by Alan B. Pearce

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>I know this problem well - many a beautifully made cable in
>my house has suffered from cat attack. Personally I never
>did much better than chasing the cats away when I caught them at it.

Our cats do go into what I term "civil disobedience mode" which involves
tearing around the house, scratching at wallpaper, "fighting" any slippers
or shoes left lying around, and generally doing anything else they can
figure out will annoy you, when they want feeding or anything else (like a
lap to curl up in) they figure they need. I wonder if the cord biting is a
version of this?

2006\07\24@055441 by Philip Pemberton

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Alan B. Pearce wrote:
> I know our cats will chase film canisters around the floor, the small ones
> 35mm film comes in, and with a few beads or similar in them to make them
> rattle they become more interesting.

I heard of someone using a laser pointer, some cheap speakers and a few 1cm
mirror tiles to build a "random laser dot" thing. Every time the thing got
turned on, the cats would (allegedly) start pawing at the laser dot...

All this talk of destructive cats kinda makes me glad I keep chinchillas. The
fur is a bit of a pain to get off clothing (but Sellotape does a decent job)
but they don't generally chew plastic wiring. They tend to go after wood
(especially pine) a lot more. Oh, and they're a real pain to recapture once
they've escaped - they move damn quick...

--
Phil.                         | Kitsune: Acorn RiscPC SA202 64M+6G ViewFinder
.....philpemKILLspamspam.....dsl.pipex.com         | Cheetah: Athlon64 3200+ A8VDeluxeV2 512M+100G
http://www.philpem.me.uk/     | Tiger: Toshiba SatPro4600 Celeron700 256M+40G

2006\07\24@060650 by Alan B. Pearce

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>I heard of someone using a laser pointer, some cheap speakers
>and a few 1cm mirror tiles to build a "random laser dot" thing.
>Every time the thing got turned on, the cats would (allegedly)
>start pawing at the laser dot...

I have seen one of ours do this to a spot of sunlight on the floor, when
something caused it to move. I think it might have been a reflection off a
watch face or something similar.

2006\07\24@063821 by Tony Smith

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> I heard of someone using a laser pointer, some cheap speakers and a few
> 1cm
> mirror tiles to build a "random laser dot" thing. Every time the thing got
> turned on, the cats would (allegedly) start pawing at the laser dot...


Cats will chase a laser around, or some other bright dot.  Good fun,
especially when you can 'encourage' the cat to do things it might
otherwise think about...

It might amuse you to know that someone actually has a patent (US at
least) on it.  "Method of Exercising a Cat" or some such.  I think you had
to move the laser around yourself though.  Pretty old, might have expired
by now.

Tony

2006\07\24@093358 by Dominic Stratten

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We paint our childs fingernails with some anti chewing stuff that tastes
absolutely disgusting. Even if he touches something after it has been
painted on the taste transfers to that.

Reminds me a bit of Clove oil but its worth a go. Try it on a toy or
something that they chew regularly and see if it puts them off.

Dom
{Original Message removed}

2006\07\24@094441 by Paul James E.

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Lindy,

I too have cats (several), and it's a chore trying to keep them out of
trouble all the time.

It just proves the old saying that .....

"Dogs have masters, cats have staff"


                                            Regards,

                                              Jim



{Quote hidden}

2006\07\24@102337 by Russell McMahon

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> We paint our childs fingernails with some anti chewing stuff that
> tastes
> absolutely disgusting. Even if he touches something after it has
> been
> painted on the taste transfers to that.

> Reminds me a bit of Clove oil but its worth a go. Try it on a toy or
> something that they chew regularly and see if it puts them off.

Pyridine, used in a vain attempt to stop alcoholics drinking
methylated spirits, is especially foul tasting in minute quantities
and *MAY* be effective for cats.

Try this: Take a small sample of methylated spirits with pyridine in -
identifiable usually by the pretty blue color. Dip your finger in it,
remove, allow meths to evaporate until finger is completely dry. Suck
finger. Be amazed. Wash mouth out repeatedly due both to taste and for
the bad things you say about Russell. Wonder at the fortitude of meths
drinkers.

I discovered this after using meths to sterilise syringes for re-use
after using them to inject our diabetic cat. But, that's another
story. (Insulin syringes cost $0.50 or $1 each depending whether you
buy them from the Chemist or the Vet - at 2 per day it makes good
economic sense to reuse them)(Vets charge twice as much for insulin
for animals as chemists charge for the absolutely identical insulin
for people).



       RM



2006\07\24@142305 by William Couture

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On 7/24/06, Russell McMahon <EraseMEapptechspam_OUTspamTakeThisOuTparadise.net.nz> wrote:

> (Vets charge twice as much for insulin
> for animals as chemists charge for the absolutely identical insulin
> for people).

I'm not sure about where you live, but here in Philadelphia we can get
veterinary prescriptions filled at a "regular" drugstore.

Also, the insulin may not be identical.  Most insulin for people these days
is actually human insulin, extracted from genetically modified bacteria.

If they are getting insulin from an actual animal, it's a different process
and may be more expensive.

Also, check out http://www.drsfostersmith.com/ for inexpensive pet
medicine.

Bill

--
Psst...  Hey, you... Buddy...  Want a kitten?  straycatblues.petfinder.org

2006\07\24@182410 by Peter

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On Sun, 23 Jul 2006, Lindy Mayfield wrote:

> I've been 3 years with one cat without any incident with mains wires
> and 1 year with 5 cats since kittens without it, but seeing bare wire
> on a wire direct to mains scared me.  My cats are my family and I'd
> never forgive myself if something happend that could have been
> prevented.

I just recently read that wires are a favorite trat to most pets,
especially pups, and not excluding even sugar gliders. And they get
fried on it eventually. So there are websites that deal with this.
Apprently getting some ultra hot jalopeno pepper sauce and smearing the
cables with it works as a deterrent.

Peter

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2006\07\25@005605 by Gus S Calabrese

face picon face
Why?  Is chewing nails a harmful process ?

On 2006-Jul 24, at 07:33hrs AM, Dominic Stratten wrote:

We paint our childs fingernails with some anti chewing stuff that tastes
absolutely disgusting. Even if he touches something after it has been
painted on the taste transfers to that.

Reminds me a bit of Clove oil but its worth a go. Try it on a toy or
something that they chew regularly and see if it puts them off.

Dom
{Original Message removed}

2006\07\25@032205 by Dominic Stratten

picon face
It got to the stage where he'd gone through his nails and was starting to
chew the area around his nails which resulted in a nasty infection and very
sore fingers.

As he has a behavioural disorder and also has an incredibly high pain
threshold (he sliced his arm open at one point and didn't notice until we
had to rush him to hospital for stitches) we had to stop this pretty quickly
before he ended up losing fingers.

{Original Message removed}

2006\07\25@075908 by Russell McMahon

face
flavicon
face
>> (Vets charge twice as much for insulin
>> for animals as chemists charge for the absolutely identical insulin
>> for people).

> I'm not sure about where you live,

New Zealand.

> but here in Philadelphia we can get
> veterinary prescriptions filled at a "regular" drugstore.

A vet with insulin on the shelf is not going to want to write a
presceription for a chemist to fill :-(

> Also, the insulin may not be identical.  Most insulin for people
> these days
> is actually human insulin, extracted from genetically modified
> bacteria.

Insulin was absolutely identical until recently - except for the
sticker that they stuck over the original label that said 'for animal
use only". I have got the identical product from a Chemist once whrn
the vet could not get it.

They have now changed to genuine animal only insulin.



   Russell

2006\07\25@124742 by Russell McMahon

face
flavicon
face
I imagine that you could sleeve cords in a braid "jacket". Cost should
not be too bad if used only in key areas.

Kevlar would also work but be far costlier.


       RM

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