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'[EE] Anybody Used Allegro Current Sensor?'
2006\11\13@211129 by Bob Axtell

face picon face
Part number is ACS750SCA050 .

With 5V in, provides a nom 2.5V output with no current
flowing. The chart indicates high accuracy in either direction
out to 50A. Insertion R is 130uOhm. Looks like all I have to
do is to acquire the 2.5V level when powering up (assuming
no current flow).

The specs are so good I am skeptical. Anybody?

--Bob

2006\11\13@220033 by Marcel Duchamp

picon face
Bob Axtell wrote:
> Part number is ACS750SCA050 .
>
> With 5V in, provides a nom 2.5V output with no current
> flowing. The chart indicates high accuracy in either direction
> out to 50A. Insertion R is 130uOhm. Looks like all I have to
> do is to acquire the 2.5V level when powering up (assuming
> no current flow).
>
> The specs are so good I am skeptical. Anybody?
>
> --Bob

Check the specs over the temp range you would be encountering, Bob.

I've been looking at the Allegro current sensors but the temperature
range spec I've been seeing approaches +/-11% error band.  If that's not
a problem for your application, then they have a lot going for them, low
sense resistance being number one.

One possibility would be to try to temp-compensate them, although it
looks like they already have so you might be facing residual errors
which are usually 2nd or 3rd order.

If you investigate further let us know.

2006\11\13@225527 by alan smith

picon face
Used one in a previous life....seemed to work great.  Have one on a new design..not that part number...20A part...soic8.....and yes...easy..for my design..100mV/amp change, nominal 2.5V center.  For higher temps...believe they make an automotive grade?  But yes...add a cap, a pullup to 5V and you get the change in the voltage.  In my case, I'm looking for a motor stall current so I dont need to carefully monitor.

Marcel Duchamp <spam_OUTmarcel.duchampTakeThisOuTspamsbcglobal.net> wrote:  Bob Axtell wrote:
> Part number is ACS750SCA050 .
>
> With 5V in, provides a nom 2.5V output with no current
> flowing. The chart indicates high accuracy in either direction
> out to 50A. Insertion R is 130uOhm. Looks like all I have to
> do is to acquire the 2.5V level when powering up (assuming
> no current flow).
>
> The specs are so good I am skeptical. Anybody?
>
> --Bob

Check the specs over the temp range you would be encountering, Bob.

I've been looking at the Allegro current sensors but the temperature
range spec I've been seeing approaches +/-11% error band. If that's not
a problem for your application, then they have a lot going for them, low
sense resistance being number one.

One possibility would be to try to temp-compensate them, although it
looks like they already have so you might be facing residual errors
which are usually 2nd or 3rd order.

If you investigate further let us know.

2006\11\14@010742 by Steve Smith

flavicon
face
Bob:
I have a couple of samples but settled for shunts and op amps its cheaper.

Steve

-----Original Message-----
From: .....piclist-bouncesKILLspamspam@spam@mit.edu [piclist-bouncesspamKILLspammit.edu] On Behalf Of
Bob Axtell
Sent: 14 November 2006 02:12
To: Microcontroller discussion list - Public.
Subject: [EE] Anybody Used Allegro Current Sensor?

Part number is ACS750SCA050 .

With 5V in, provides a nom 2.5V output with no current
flowing. The chart indicates high accuracy in either direction
out to 50A. Insertion R is 130uOhm. Looks like all I have to
do is to acquire the 2.5V level when powering up (assuming
no current flow).

The specs are so good I am skeptical. Anybody?

--Bob

2006\11\14@014546 by Denny Esterline

picon face
> Part number is ACS750SCA050 .
>
> With 5V in, provides a nom 2.5V output with no current
> flowing. The chart indicates high accuracy in either direction
> out to 50A. Insertion R is 130uOhm. Looks like all I have to
> do is to acquire the 2.5V level when powering up (assuming
> no current flow).
>
> The specs are so good I am skeptical. Anybody?
>
> --Bob

The thing that turned me off them was the pinout. No, I didn't expect to put a 50 amp part in a breadboard :-)
The leadframe needs oval holes for the high current connections, puts it outside the limitations of the "prototype" service from all the board houses I checked - board costs easily exceeded the price of a precision shunt resistor and op-amp.

-Denny


2006\11\14@062114 by Bob Axtell

face picon face
Marcel Duchamp wrote:
{Quote hidden}

Take a look at the specs NOW. It would beat +/-11% I am sure. I believe
they are compensating well
with temperature.

The application is not very precise; the client only wants to detect a
FLOW of current, so that anything
over 1 A would be acceptable. And since there can be reverse current
direction, the old method of
measuring across a precise resistor won't work either (because it goes
below ground, requiring a mirror).

I think this is a good choice for only $6 USD. Use a simple PIC10F222 or
a PIC12F675 to make the
measurement.

--Bob


2006\11\14@070857 by Gerhard Fiedler

picon face
Denny Esterline wrote:

> The thing that turned me off them was the pinout. No, I didn't expect to
> put a 50 amp part in a breadboard :-) The leadframe needs oval holes for
> the high current connections, puts it outside the limitations of the
> "prototype" service from all the board houses I checked - board costs
> easily exceeded the price of a precision shunt resistor and op-amp.

I used them (the 50 A parts) with round holes and lots of solder. Seemed to
work well enough.

Gerhard

2006\11\14@074912 by PicDude

flavicon
face
Similar situation on my end.  The samples (130A-versions in my case) are on
hold because I've not fouind a good way to run 130A on the PCB to the
terminals of the current sensor.  I also remember not being able to find PCB
screw terminals that can handle that much current.

-Neil.



On Tuesday 14 November 2006 00:08, Steve Smith wrote:
> Bob:
> I have a couple of samples but settled for shunts and op amps its cheaper.
>
> Steve
>
> {Original Message removed}

2006\11\14@111317 by Ariel Rocholl

picon face
What about soldering a cable of the appropiate gauge rather a PCB lane? I
asked for samples to them some time ago and still waiting to get here, but
before receiving them my plan for measuring up to 100A was to use a cable
soldered to the PCB acting as a lane. Otherwise, it is not only the PCB may
not hold the high current, but the power loss will be very high with 100A
and the efficiency of the system will be impacted, something you should be
able to avoid with a hall effect sensor. Otherwise I would bet by a
resistive shunt.

2006/11/14, PicDude <.....picdude2KILLspamspam.....avn-tech.com>:
{Quote hidden}

> > {Original Message removed}

2006\11\14@113634 by PicDude

flavicon
face
Take a look at Zetex ZXCT1009 and ZXCT1010 (from Mouser), which may serve your
needs.  You can put two on them back-to-back to measure bi-directional
current.

Cheers,
-Neil.



On Tuesday 14 November 2006 05:08, Bob Axtell wrote:
{Quote hidden}

2006\11\14@115727 by Alan B. Pearce

face picon face
>Take a look at Zetex ZXCT1009 and ZXCT1010 (from Mouser),
...

Also the LT6100 and LTC6101 from Linear Technology, and HV7800 from Supertex
Inc. This one can be used at mains voltages (up to around 400V IIRC).

>You can put two on them back-to-back to measure bi-directional
>current.

These would all need the same as well for that purpose.

2006\11\14@121049 by William Chops Westfield

face picon face

On Nov 14, 2006, at 3:08 AM, Bob Axtell wrote:

> the client only wants to detect a FLOW of current, so that anything
> over 1 A would be acceptable.

In that case, can't you just use a small coil and a (really cheap)
(digital) hall effect sensor?

BillW

2006\11\14@121612 by Steve Smith

flavicon
face
We fit busbar (25mm x 2mm) to the pcb to collect the current and provide
termination points to the world it overcomes the problems of terminals and
gives a stable location to bolt 35mm cables. It also makes like a heatsink
(of sorts)

Steve

{Original Message removed}

2006\11\14@140627 by PicDude

flavicon
face
What, pray tell, is this busbar of which you speak?  I had originally looked
at PCB terminals such as Figure D in the top left of this page...
http://www.mouser.com/catalog/628/1219.pdf , since they are a nice interface
to the outside world.  But they only go up to 15 or 20A.

-Neil.



On Tuesday 14 November 2006 11:14, Steve Smith wrote:
> We fit busbar (25mm x 2mm) to the pcb to collect the current and provide
> termination points to the world it overcomes the problems of terminals and
> gives a stable location to bolt 35mm cables. It also makes like a heatsink
> (of sorts)
>
> Steve

2006\11\14@140814 by PicDude

flavicon
face
On Tuesday 14 November 2006 11:10, William Chops Westfield wrote:
> On Nov 14, 2006, at 3:08 AM, Bob Axtell wrote:
> > the client only wants to detect a FLOW of current, so that anything
> > over 1 A would be acceptable.
>
> In that case, can't you just use a small coil and a (really cheap)
> (digital) hall effect sensor?
>
> BillW

Straying off the OP's requirement a bit... In general, using hall effect
sensors in this manner, wouldn't this require calibration of each unit?

-Neil.

2006\11\14@204459 by Bob Axtell

face picon face
William Chops Westfield wrote:
> On Nov 14, 2006, at 3:08 AM, Bob Axtell wrote:
>
>  
>> the client only wants to detect a FLOW of current, so that anything
>> over 1 A would be acceptable.
>>    
>
> In that case, can't you just use a small coil and a (really cheap)
> (digital) hall effect sensor?
>
> BillW
>  
Gee Bill, that is very clever. I had not thought of it. I might try that
for GO/NOGO testing.

--Bob

2006\11\14@222658 by Matt Pobursky

flavicon
face
On Tue, 14 Nov 2006 18:05:57 -0700, Bob Axtell wrote:
> William Chops Westfield wrote:
>> On Nov 14, 2006, at 3:08 AM, Bob Axtell wrote:
>>
>>
>>> the client only wants to detect a FLOW of current, so that
>>> anything over 1 A would be acceptable.
>>>
>>>
>> In that case, can't you just use a small coil and a (really
>> cheap) (digital) hall effect sensor?
>>
>> BillW
>>
> Gee Bill, that is very clever. I had not thought of it. I might try
> that for GO/NOGO testing.

We needed a way to test a Hall Effect switch used in a paddle wheel
type flow sensor assembly in production. We didn't want any moving
Rube Goldberg type contraptions so we made a small electromagnet
assembly (steel core coil) and pulsed it to simulate a rotating
magnet. It worked great and was easy to implement.

Lately I've been playing with NVE's GMR sensors. Nice devices, very
sensitive and easy to use.

Matt Pobursky
Maximum Performance Systems

2006\11\15@012459 by Steve Smith

flavicon
face
Copper 2mm thick 30mm wide made with a castleated edge to our spec's closest
is commercial product is 18mm centre distribution busbar as made by MG
legrand ABB ect its got pins that are designed to fit circuit breakers in
distribution boards we solder it into PCBs.

Steve

{Original Message removed}

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