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'[EE] Analogue development board'
2011\12\15@050307 by cdb

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I've just noticed that MikroElectronika have just brought out a Analog system Lab Kit using TI parts.

It contains Op-Amps, 2 * 12 bit DAC's, buck DC/DC controller, analogue multipliers. It appears to be aimed at schools and for those learning and experimenting with analogue devices.

http://www.mikroe.com/eng/products/view/790/analog-system-lab-kit-pro/

Colin

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cdb,   15/12/2011
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2011\12\15@080336 by Mark Hanchey

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On 12/15/2011 5:03 AM, cdb wrote:
>   I've just noticed that MikroElectronika have just brought out a Analog
> system Lab Kit using TI parts.

I liked the board until I looked at the price. $150  ?
I can't see that even close to justified for what is offered.
Mark

2011\12\15@092725 by Electron

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At 14.02 2011.12.15, you wrote:
>On 12/15/2011 5:03 AM, cdb wrote:
>>   I've just noticed that MikroElectronika have just brought out a Analog
>> system Lab Kit using TI parts.
>
>I liked the board until I looked at the price. $150  ?
>I can't see that even close to justified for what is offered.

Sometime we forget we have breadboards. :-)

2011\12\15@110356 by John Ferrell

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I have two of their Pic boards and I like them most of the time.

The new offering is intended as a learning-teaching tool.  The breadboards are better after the user gets some experience. It is hard to keep up with an inventory of parts for breadboards. Having everything on one board eliminates the problem. This is the lowest density board that I have seen from them. The other boards are so crowded that there is no way to mount them!

John Ferrell W8CCW
"The man who complains about the way the
ball bounces is likely to be the one who dropped it."
 

On 12/15/2011 9:27 AM, Electron wrote:
> At 14.02 2011.12.15, you wrote:
>> On 12/15/2011 5:03 AM, cdb wrote:
>>>    I've just noticed that MikroElectronika have just brought out a Analog
>>> system Lab Kit using TI parts.
>> I liked the board until I looked at the price. $150  ?
>> I can't see that even close to justified for what is offered.
> Sometime we forget we have breadboards. :-)
>

2011\12\15@111506 by jim

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Also, the plug in breadboards aren't really very good for anything over
a Mhz or so because of too much capacitance causing problems.  At least
in my experience anyway.

Jim

Regards,

Jim

> ---{Original Message removed}

2011\12\15@115557 by PICdude

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Lately, I'm slowly starting to appreciate the value of dev-boards (ie:  justifying the cost to reduce learning/dev time), and I really need to  re-learn op-amps, etc.  And mikroelectronica really makes their stuff  look simple/easy to use.  But this is considerably pricey.  I would've  bit at prob $50 to $75.

Cheers,
-Neil.



Quoting cdb <.....colinKILLspamspam@spam@btech-online.co.uk>:

{Quote hidden}

>

2011\12\15@135240 by John Ferrell

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Note that you can download the manual, schematic and graph paper at no cost..
It is easy to replicate the individual circuits on a breadboard.

I think they are just stirring up interest with the product.
It seems to be priced at their per square inch PC board cost + markup.

John Ferrell W8CCW
"The man who complains about the way the
ball bounces is likely to be the one who dropped it."
 

On 12/15/2011 11:55 AM, PICdude wrote:
{Quote hidden}

>> -

2011\12\15@214152 by PICdude

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Yep, saw that.  I've pretty much given up on breadboards after chasing  down issues which turned out to be flaky connections.  But laying out  a PCB and tossing it in my next multi-circuit proto panel is simple.

Cheers,
-Neil.


Quoting John Ferrell <jferrell13spamspam_OUTtriad.rr.com>:

{Quote hidden}

>>> --

2011\12\16@115016 by John Ferrell

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I have not had any problems with breadboards since I quit trying to make them neat. Make certain that the wires are long enough to push around for easy access under them. Use only 22 or 24 gauge wire. assemble with hemostats. Stay aware that high inductance & capacitance exists everywhere. Anchor all off board wiring connections.


John Ferrell W8CCW
"The man who complains about the way the
ball bounces is likely to be the one who dropped it."
 

On 12/15/2011 9:41 PM, PICdude wrote:
{Quote hidden}

2011\12\18@075449 by Lindy Mayfield

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This looked nice so I got it as a present.  Then I noticed it wants a 10V power.  Would a 9V battery work here in this case?

Regards
Lindy

{Original Message removed}

2011\12\18@090452 by Chris Roper

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It needs + and - 10V so two Batteries would be needed. I am not sure if 9V
is sufficient, I will leave that up to the experts, but you cant hurt it
by trying with 9V. Obviously the results you obtain will be different to
those given in the Training Manual so adjust the results appropriately.


On 18 December 2011 14:54, Lindy Mayfield <RemoveMELindy.MayfieldspamTakeThisOuTsas.com> wrote:

> This looked nice so I got it as a present.  Then I noticed it wants a 10V
> power.  Would a 9V battery work here in this case?
>
> Regards
> Lindy
>
> {Original Message removed}

2011\12\18@192544 by Lindy Mayfield

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where would my friend get 10 volts from?  
-----Original Message-----
From: piclist-bouncesEraseMEspam.....mit.edu [EraseMEpiclist-bouncesspammit.edu] On Behalf Of Chris Roper
Sent: Sunday, December 18, 2011 4:05 PM
To: Microcontroller discussion list - Public.
Subject: Re: [EE] Analogue development board

It needs + and - 10V so two Batteries would be needed. I am not sure if 9V is sufficient, I will leave that up to the experts, but you cant hurt it  by trying with 9V. Obviously the results you obtain will be different to those given in the Training Manual so adjust the results appropriately.

2011\12\18@200206 by Isaac Marino Bavaresco

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A 10V+10V regulated symmetrical power supply can be made with a
center-tapped 12V+12V transformer, four rectifier diodes plus an LM7810
and an LM7910.


Best regards,

Isaac



Em 18/12/2011 22:25, Lindy Mayfield escreveu:
> where would my friend get 10 volts from?  
>
> {Original Message removed}

2011\12\19@015914 by IVP

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> where would my friend get 10 volts from?

A couple of MC34063 would provide +/- 10V from a single
DC supply

eg here's -10V I need for an LCD

http://home.clear.net.nz/pages/joecolquitt/bmp2lcd.html

with another MC34063 as a positive step-down/up, depending
on the DC supply value

As Isaac said, a 78xx can be used for the +10V. It needn't
necessarily be a 7810, as the reference ('ground') pin can be
lifted above 0V. Similarly an LM317

Jo

2011\12\19@110101 by Lindy Mayfield

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Is there some ready solution that I can buy that you know of?  I got this for a friend, and is clueless how to create a circuit like this.

I'm also of course googling, but there are many things out there I don't understand very well.

Thanks!
Lindy

-----Original Message-----
From: RemoveMEpiclist-bouncesEraseMEspamEraseMEmit.edu [RemoveMEpiclist-bouncesspam_OUTspamKILLspammit.edu] On Behalf Of IVP
Sent: Monday, December 19, 2011 8:57 AM
To: Microcontroller discussion list - Public.
Subject: Re: [EE] Analogue development board

> where would my friend get 10 volts from?

A couple of MC34063 would provide +/- 10V from a single DC supply

2011\12\19@114701 by doug metzler

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search.digikey.com/us/en/products/GLC110-212G/271-2301-ND/1036554.

Not quite a ready solution, but with a couple of shunt regs could do the trick.

http://search.digikey.com/us/en/products/LM7910CT/LM7910CT-ND/1954736

Interestingly Digikey doesn't have the 7810 in stock.  Maybe Mouser.

DougM

On Mon, Dec 19, 2011 at 8:00 AM, Lindy Mayfield <RemoveMELindy.MayfieldTakeThisOuTspamspamsas.com> wrote:
{Quote hidden}

>

2011\12\19@152226 by cdb

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I don't think you need to be too concerned about the +/- 10v supply, though there will be a slight difference in the results, a +/-9v battery supply will work as another poster mentioned, all the IC's can work at that voltage level, only the DAC has a maximum 5v supply  and that is fed via a regulator.

If you would feel happier with a 10v supply then there are a couple of ways to either make or buy one.

I'll see if i can make a couple of PS circuits to help, when I get home this afternoon.

Colin --
cdb, colinSTOPspamspamspam_OUTbtech-online.co.uk on 20/12/2011
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2011\12\19@160927 by IVP

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> a +/-9v battery supply will work

There's probably nothing too fussy about 9 or 10. Maybe they've
chosen 10 for maths, or a recommended supply

Once the novelty of replacing batteries wears off it'll end up unused.
It would be much better, and more economic, to use a transformer
or AC wallwart for a long-life stable voltage

RS have +/- 12 and +/- 15 DC/DC converters. No +/- 10 seen

http://newzealand.rs-online.com/web/c/power-supplies/power-supplies-inverters-dc-dc-converters-generators/dc-dc-converters/?sort-by=default&sort-order=default&applied-dimensions=4294880637&lastAttributeSelectedBlock=4294958691

Reasonable at 10s of mA, gets pricey over 100mA, and you need
a DC source

For the price you could put together a chassis-mount transformer,
bridge and regulators and get exactly what you want

Joe

2011\12\19@165121 by jim

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My guess would be they chose 10 volts because it is between the 5 volt
TTL supply rail and the    +/- 15 volt rails opamps typically use.  But, that's just a guess.

And assuming you use signals that doesn't rail the opamp, it probably
won't make any discernable difference
from an experimenters point of view.  You could probably measure a
slight difference in power consumed,  but if you did, it would be so small as to be inconsequential.
You could even use +/- 5 volts if you so chose, but then again, you'd
have to have some sort of negative  power source.   Building a +/- power source is a realatively simple
operation, especially if you use linear
regulators.  However, building a simple switcher for complimentary
oltages isn't that much more difficult.

As a matter of fact, you could use two 9 volt batteries to use the
analog board itself to design a  regulator, and then build upon what you learn to design and build your
own power supply.  This would not  only give some justification for buying the board in the first place,
it would give you practical  experience and practice with the various circuits.

What ever you do, have fun and learn.  You'll never know when you'll
need the technical skills you will  acquire from the experiments you perform.


Regards,

Jim

> ---{Original Message removed}

2011\12\20@054606 by cdb

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part 1 1047 bytes content-type:text/plain; charset="us-ascii" (decoded quoted-printable)

Attached (hopefully) is a ready to go schematic. The bottom one shows a split transformer (0-10v, 0-10v)  which can be substituted. Just tie the two 0v lines together.

If the 7810 is hard to find you can either use a 7809 (1 Amp)and raise the voltage by using a resistor divider as in http://synthdiy.com/files/2006/LM7812.pdf or insert two diode in the from pin 2 to earth with the cathodes connecting to the 0v line.

As has been mentioned there will be no problem if you just use 7809 and 7909 regulators which more places will stock or an LM2937/LM2991 (500mA). Another alternative would be to buy an adjustable regulator - the LM317T (1A5).

The datasheets for these parts will have suggested circuits.

Colin
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part 2 19252 bytes content-type:image/png; name="posneg_ps.PNG" (decode)


part 3 181 bytes content-type:text/plain; name="ATT00001.txt"
(decoded base64)

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2011\12\20@060452 by cdb

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Just noticed an error from when I moved a cap. The +v side of the bridge should go to the top of C1 not the bottom.

Colin
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2011\12\20@170350 by Lindy Mayfield

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your advice, and help, is so very much welcome. but perhaps I misunderstood the purpose of this "learning" board.  can they give me a "learning" board to experiment with analog stuff, then expect me to know enough to create a 10v power supply?  that is what my problem is.

I can of course put together the circuits that create a 10V power supply, but, in my defense, such a learning sort of  board and stuff shouldn't expect me to know how to do that.  Should they?  This is just a learning/development board.  I pay not so much to buy the circuits and the board, but more the "how to" part of it all.  Well, it was a gift for a friend who knows  not too much, but wants to learn.
now, how do I tell him that I need to put together a bread-board with the recommended IC's to create 10 volts from, say 9 or whatever (4 AA's in sequence).  Or some sort of AC to DC power supply such as a wall wort.    I am just not smart enough to bridge the gap between me and him.  but I really am trying my best to learn this.  (I have Horowitz in my shelf, also Boyelstad.)  Ahhh.

bestest regards, Lindy

{Original Message removed}

2011\12\20@172820 by IVP

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> know enough to create a 10v power supply?  that is what my problem is

Looking at the schematics

http://www.mikroe.com/eng/downloads/get/1742/aslk_pro_schematics.pdf

one point of entry for 10V is the TPS7250 regulator

http://www.ti.com/product/tps7250

At 10V Vin max it's a donkey on the edge

Subject to further checking I would run this board at +/- 9V max

I think their suggestion of +/- 10V is somewhat reckless and a accident
waiting to 'appen

And your point is noted - how are you supposed to know this ?

Joe

2011\12\20@174122 by John Ferrell

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On 12/20/2011 5:03 PM, Lindy Mayfield wrote:
> your advice, and help, is so very much welcome. but perhaps I misunderstood the purpose of this "learning" board.  can they give me a "learning" board to experiment with analog stuff, then expect me to know enough to create a 10v power supply?  that is what my problem is.
>
> I can of course put together the circuits that create a 10V power supply, but, in my defense, such a learning sort of  board and stuff shouldn't expect me to know how to do that.  Should they?  This is just a learning/development board.  I pay not so much to buy the circuits and the board, but more the "how to" part of it all.  Well, it was a gift for a friend who knows  not too much, but wants to learn.
>
> now, how do I tell him that I need to put together a bread-board with the recommended IC's to create 10 volts from, say 9 or whatever (4 AA's in sequence).  Or some sort of AC to DC power supply such as a wall wort.    I am just not smart enough to bridge the gap between me and him.  but I really am trying my best to learn this.  (I have Horowitz in my shelf, also Boyelstad.)  Ahhh.
>
> bestest regards, Lindy
>
>
Two 12 volt, 1 Amp wall warts.
Either cut off the connectors and attach them permanently or a couple of the appropriate receptacles wired permanently.

Easy & safe!

-- John Ferrell W8CCW
"The man who complains about the way the
ball bounces is likely to be the one who dropped it."

2011\12\20@184853 by Chris Roper

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I think the target market was more for Collage/University labs which would
already be equipped with Bench power supply's.
If your friend is serious about learning and experimenting in electronics
he will need a Bench Supply sooner rather than later anyway, so It may be a
good idea to budget for one early and just run the board off 2
9V battery's until then.


On 21 December 2011 00:41, John Ferrell <EraseMEjferrell13spamEraseMEtriad.rr.com> wrote:

{Quote hidden}

>

2011\12\21@052732 by cdb

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On Wed, 21 Dec 2011 01:48:53 +0200, Chris Roper wrote:
:: I think the target market was more for Collage/University labs which
:: would already be equipped with Bench power supply's.

What he said :) . In the meantime though, two rechargeable 9v batteries would do for starters.

Colin
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2011\12\21@081949 by PICdude

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Missed part of this thread, but it seems this is about the same Mikroe  analog dev board.  Won't this work with +/-9V?  I'd be surprised if it  didn't and a quick email to Mikroe should validate this.  Then you  should be able to use two 9V batteries in series with the midpoint as  ground.  At least for a start.  Mikroe may also have a solution for  this already.

Cheers,
-Neil.


Quoting Lindy Mayfield <spamBeGoneLindy.MayfieldspamKILLspamsas.com>:

{Quote hidden}

> {Original Message removed}

2011\12\21@213237 by William \Chops\ Westfield

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>> it was a gift for a friend who knows  not too much, but wants to learn.

all things considered, for $150 a better gift might be an assembled benchtop power supply (like, say, http://www.jameco.com/webapp/wcs/stores/servlet/Product_10001_10001_2130378_-1 ), a protoboard, and an assortment of single-supply op-amps and analog parts.

Of the test equipment I own, the benchtop power supply is the one that gets the most use.  It power circuits (with protection for assorted mistakes), charges batteries, measures performance, and more!

BillW

2011\12\23@173909 by Lindy Mayfield

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Yes I thought to wait for the docs before starting to build anything.   However I've already learned a lot, so thanks for that.

Lindy

{Original Message removed}

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