Searching \ for '[EE]:: Rodent repeller' in subject line. ()
Make payments with PayPal - it's fast, free and secure! Help us get a faster server
FAQ page: techref.massmind.org/techref/index.htm?key=rodent+repeller
Search entire site for: ': Rodent repeller'.

Exact match. Not showing close matches.
PICList Thread
'[EE]:: Rodent repeller'
2011\07\05@111637 by RussellMc

face picon face
Ultrasonic xxx effectors where xxx = rats, ants, dogs, poverty and
disease and effection = removal, killing enrichment etc as appropriate
are about as time honoured  as oxygen free speaker cables and crystal
whatevers.

People are selling a well presented rat repeller here (New Zealand)
for about $150 at present. Well presented by a company that may be
doing OK with traditional systems, such as knocjking them on the head,
or whatever. Or not. Their shaky credibility is furher eroded by
claims of it using "ultrasonic and electromagnetic" methods (or energy
or whatever).

The chase:

          BUT has anyone had any practical experience in successfully
using ultrasonic energy to repell / kill / destroy /  ... anything.

Preferably well controlled double blind against placebo trials with
sample sizes of E6 or more.
But, any input welcome.

It makes some sort of sense that creatures which  have ultrasonic
sensitive hearing or other bodily bits (Martha! - my thorax is
thrumming !!!) may decide to decamp if exposed to suitable ultrasonic
energy levels. Pulsing or not may help or not. So not quite certain
it's wholly snake oil.

Given enough enthusiasm I might manage to fire up something at greater
than usual ultrasonic power levels and give it a go. Ideally I won't
manage to drive our 18 year old Burmese cat to distraction.



                 Russel

2011\07\05@112622 by doug metzler

picon face
I did a little research on this when rats moved in to my crawl space
and all the tests I found said that while rats are sensitive to
ultrasonic and may react at first eventually they get used to the
noise and thus the effectiveness is null.

DougM

On Tue, Jul 5, 2011 at 8:15 AM, RussellMc <spam_OUTapptechnzTakeThisOuTspamgmail.com> wrote:
{Quote hidden}

>

2011\07\05@114156 by Michael Rigby-Jones

flavicon
face


> -----Original Message-----
> From: .....piclist-bouncesKILLspamspam@spam@mit.edu [piclist-bouncesspamKILLspammit.edu] On
Behalf
{Quote hidden}

High frequency sound is used to prevent teenagers loitering around shops
etc. and that seems to have some measure of success - it's definitely an
annoying sound if your ears are young enough to hear it.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_Mosquito

There are some studies liked in the Wikipedia article on electronic pest
control

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Electronic_pest_control

The pdf from Kansas State University is interesting, if only for the
chart that shows the hearing frequency range for various animals.  I
wasn't aware that Whales and Dolphins had such an extended range, from
sub-hertz to extended ultrasonic frequencies.

Regards

Mike

=======================================================================
This e-mail is intended for the person it is addressed to only. The
information contained in it may be confidential and/or protected by
law. If you are not the intended recipient of this message, you must
not make any use of this information, or copy or show it to any
person. Please contact us immediately to tell us that you have
received this e-mail, and return the original to us. Any use,
forwarding, printing or copying of this message is strictly prohibited.
No part of this message can be considered a request for goods or
services.
=======================================================================

2011\07\05@135324 by Michael Watterson

face picon face
On 05/07/2011 16:26, doug metzler wrote:
> I did a little research on this when rats moved in to my crawl space
> and all the tests I found said that while rats are sensitive to
> ultrasonic and may react at first eventually they get used to the
> noise and thus the effectiveness is null.

That's what I would expect. Actually some of the "repellers" on sale here leave out the Ultrasound (no doubt it's expensive) and just claim "electromagnetic". I don't believe that. Esp. since replacing gnawed mains cable when fuses went. No body.

Dogs and Guinea pigs really don't like it, but familiarity and then food wins.

*Rats*
Attempted drowning only works it they are in tunnels. They swim well.

Knocking on head is very difficult. The rats and mice won't wait for the blow,

Poison sometimes works. but how well is hard to say.

A cage type "trapping" thing with choice bird seed and/or Guinea pig food works after birds have been caught and released several times. But they are mighty suspicious. Also then there is a live and cross rat to deal with. "Snappy" traps (wooden, metal or plastic) work ok for mice, but the rats are hardly ever caught. Too suspicious of them I think.

I'm told shooting works (you have to spot them 1st). I've not tried that.

Just because you haven't seen rodents doesn't mean they are not there

2011\07\05@165621 by Gerhard Fiedler

picon face
Michael Watterson wrote:

> *Rats* Attempted drowning only works it they are in tunnels. They
> swim well.
>
> Knocking on head is very difficult. The rats and mice won't wait for
> the blow,
>
> Poison sometimes works. but how well is hard to say.
>
> A cage type "trapping" thing with choice bird seed and/or Guinea pig
> food works after birds have been caught and released several times.
> But they are mighty suspicious. Also then there is a live and cross
> rat to deal with. "Snappy" traps (wooden, metal or plastic) work ok
> for mice, but the rats are hardly ever caught. Too suspicious of them
> I think.
>
> I'm told shooting works (you have to spot them 1st). I've not tried
> that.
What worked best for me are traps that are a flat plate filled with a
sticky goo that obviously smells attractive for rats. They step on it
and can't step off it anymore.
Gerhar

2011\07\05@182547 by IVP

face picon face
> BUT has anyone had any practical experience in successfully
> using ultrasonic energy to repell / kill / destroy /  ... anything.

I believe electronic mosquito repellers are rubbish. SPCA advises
not to willy-nilly use ultrasonic devices on dogs, but posties etc do
have them as irritants. So, when you're trying to get to the mailbox
and that pit bull isn't quite pissed off enough .....

Short of dropping it in an ultrasonic bath (and drowning it) I can't
imagine anything being physically harmed in normal circumstances
when the pest has the freedom to escape

As Doug says, familiarity breeds contempt. Or de-sensitisation. A
variable warble with unexpected events would probably work better
than a continuous tone (cf burglar alarms)

Jo

2011\07\05@183453 by IVP

face picon face

>> Poison sometimes works. but how well is hard to say

Same as antibiotics - you have to have variety. Rats are canny.
They'll eat a little of something and if it doesn't make them sick
they go back for more or ignore it

My friend has an excellent mouser cat at her factory. At least
once a week she'll find a rat jigsaw the cat has made for her

Aw, bless

> What worked best for me are traps that are a flat plate filled
> with a sticky goo that obviously smells attractive for rats. They
> step on it and can't step off it anymore

I believe those are now illegal (at least in NZ) for being inhumane.
Would be OK if there was a secondary system, like a CO2 canister
to euthanise the rat

Jo

2011\07\05@190057 by Michael Watterson

face picon face
On 05/07/2011 23:34, IVP wrote:
> My friend has an excellent mouser cat at her factory. At least
> once a week she'll find a rat jigsaw the cat has made for her

Though a domestic cat is generally poorer than a Terrier. The domestic cat will eat 5000 species, it might be polishing off songbirds and rare moths too . Rat is just part of mixed Starters.

2011\07\05@193530 by RussellMc

face picon face
> Though a domestic cat is generally poorer than a Terrier. The domestic
> cat will eat 5000 species, it might be polishing off songbirds and rare
> moths too . Rat is just part of mixed Starters..

Long ago we lived just outside the city boundary  (in Hamilton, NZ),
with maize fields just beyond our house. We had a cat that would
occasionally bring home small rabbits and bring them inside and eat
half of them - invariably leaving the bottom half on the kitchen mat.

We had a cat ramp to a window. A heavy thump in the night was warning
to get up and eject cat and dead but still whole rabbit and shut
window. Pussy and prey got to sleep outside that night.


     Russel

2011\07\06@103926 by Sean Breheny

face picon face
www.latimes.com/news/local/la-me-feralcats29dec29,0,1730444.story

This is one case of several police stations attracting feral cat
colonies with some food - they found it very effective in getting rid
of their mouse and rat problem. Presumably they do not feed the cats
to the point where they become lazy bums :) Just hungry enough to want
to keep hunting. The article says that the cats catch some rodents but
the main thing is that the rodents move on when they realize (based on
smell and sight) that there are predators around.

Sean


On Tue, Jul 5, 2011 at 7:00 PM, Michael Watterson <.....mikeKILLspamspam.....radioway.org> wrote:
> On 05/07/2011 23:34, IVP wrote:
>> My friend has an excellent mouser cat at her factory. At least
>> once a week she'll find a rat jigsaw the cat has made for her
>
> Though a domestic cat is generally poorer than a Terrier. The domestic
> cat will eat 5000 species, it might be polishing off songbirds and rare
> moths too . Rat is just part of mixed Starters..
>

2011\07\06@154456 by alan.b.pearce

face picon face
{Quote hidden}

I believe one of the best rat 'poisons' is sherbet - the sweet lolly powder stuff you had as kids. Rats apparently love it, eat it in grand style, then find their mouth is rather dry so go looking for water. What happens when sherbet and water mix? The same happens in the rats stomach, effectively bloating them and causing rupture of various sections of the body, which kills them.

Haven't had occasion to try it myself, the technique came from a 'back to the land' magazine.
-- Scanned by iCritical.

2011\07\06@155854 by RussellMc

face picon face
> The same happens in the rats stomach, effectively bloating
>  them and causing rupture of various sections of the body,
> which kills them.

> Haven't had occasion to try it myself ...

You'd have to eat a lot of sherbert :-)

I suspect mythbusters would have fun with that one, either way. The
rats may not. .


2011\07\06@155911 by alan.b.pearce

face picon face
> > Though a domestic cat is generally poorer than a Terrier. The
> domestic
> > cat will eat 5000 species, it might be polishing off songbirds and
> rare
> > moths too . Rat is just part of mixed Starters..
>
> Long ago we lived just outside the city boundary  (in Hamilton, NZ),
> with maize fields just beyond our house. We had a cat that would
> occasionally bring home small rabbits and bring them inside and eat
> half of them - invariably leaving the bottom half on the kitchen mat.
>
> We had a cat ramp to a window. A heavy thump in the night was warning
> to get up and eject cat and dead but still whole rabbit and shut
> window. Pussy and prey got to sleep outside that night.

Ours has been known to bring home the occasional frog, half a goldfish (the other half must have been extra tasty), catch the odd pigeon as well - including bring one in the first morning we had a couple of young doctoral student ladies stay with us for a couple of days, in addition to the occasional mouse that we bring home as a present, play with it, but don't kill it (we are too well fed to that), and leave it in the house once we get bored with it ...
-- Scanned by iCritical.

2011\07\06@160624 by Spehro Pefhany

picon face
At 03:39 PM 06/07/2011, you wrote:
{Quote hidden}

Evidently sherbet (UK) is quite different from the sorbet-like (sort of ice-cream light) sherbet I know.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sherbet_%28powder%29

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sorbet#American_terminology

I don't think I've ever seen it or "soda powder".

>Haven't had occasion to try it myself, the technique came from a
>'back to the land' magazine.


Best regards,

Spehro Pefhany --"it's the network..."            "The Journey is the reward"
EraseMEspeffspam_OUTspamTakeThisOuTinterlog.com             Info for manufacturers: http://www.trexon.com
Embedded software/hardware/analog  Info for designers:  http://www.speff.com

2011\07\06@161016 by Bob Blick

face
flavicon
face
If it was robotic it would be [EE] but this thread fragment is deep
[OT], please alter your tags.

Thanks,
Bob

> > > Though a domestic cat is generally poorer than a Terrier.

-- http://www.fastmail.fm - A no graphics, no pop-ups email service

2011\07\06@163844 by alan.b.pearce

face picon face
> Evidently sherbet (UK) is quite different from the sorbet-like (sort
> of ice-cream light) sherbet I know.
>
> en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sherbet_%28powder%29
>
> en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sorbet#American_terminology
>
> I don't think I've ever seen it or "soda powder".

Hmm, the original reference came from an American magazine, but as I said, I haven't attempted to verify it.
-- Scanned by iCritical.

More... (looser matching)
- Last day of these posts
- In 2011 , 2012 only
- Today
- New search...