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PICList Thread
'[BUY] Want to buy some stripboard'
2006\03\15@133714 by John Nall

picon face
I need about a half dozen or so stripboards for a project.  I prefer
Veroboard, but anything along that line will do, so long as it follows
the same model as Veroboard (separate strips, with all the holes in each
strip electrically joined).

I know that there are some people on here, such as Wouter, who sell
things, but I don't know who most of you are, and the language at
voti.nl seems to be Dutch (with regard to the Webstore part).  So
figured this would be the best way to find out who might have such a
thing available.

If you can help, please email me offline, with price and dimensions of
the boards.  Payment would be by PayPal.  Whether it comes from the U.S.
or some other country is immaterial so long as the total price is
reasonable.   Any reasonable delivery time would be acceptable.

Thanks,
John

2006\03\15@142437 by Wouter van Ooijen

face picon face
> the language at
> voti.nl seems to be Dutch (with regard to the Webstore part).

did you notice the UK flag in the left frame?

or directly: www.voti.nl/shop/p/M-PERFBOARD-STRIPES-50x100.html
and http://www.voti.nl/shop/p/M-PERFBOARD-STRIPES-100x160.html.

Wouter van Ooijen

-- -------------------------------------------
Van Ooijen Technische Informatica: http://www.voti.nl
consultancy, development, PICmicro products
docent Hogeschool van Utrecht: http://www.voti.nl/hvu


2006\03\15@155158 by Dwayne Reid

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face
At 11:37 AM 3/15/2006, John Nall wrote:
>I need about a half dozen or so stripboards for a project.  I prefer
>Veroboard, but anything along that line will do, so long as it follows
>the same model as Veroboard (separate strips, with all the holes in each
>strip electrically joined).
>
>If you can help, please email me offline, with price and dimensions of
>the boards.  Payment would be by PayPal.  Whether it comes from the U.S.
>or some other country is immaterial so long as the total price is
>reasonable.   Any reasonable delivery time would be acceptable.

Please - keep this ON the list.  I, too, am looking for an on-going
supply of Veroboard or other form of stripboard and I suspect that
others are as well.  Probably wants to move to an [OT] tag, though.

dwayne

--
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2006\03\15@161101 by John Nall

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Wouter van Ooijen wrote:
>> > > the language at
>> voti.nl seems to be Dutch (with regard to the Webstore part).
>>    
>
>  > did you notice the UK flag in the left frame?
>  
.
No, not really.  But even if I had, I don't think that I would have
picked up on the fact that clicking on the UK flag would change  the
language to English.  I don't really think of the UK as an
English-speaking country.  :-)

At any rate, I now know, and guess others do too, so that is a good  
thing.   Thanks.

John

2006\03\15@162824 by Timothy Weber

face picon face
John Nall wrote:
> I need about a half dozen or so stripboards for a project.  I prefer
> Veroboard, but anything along that line will do, so long as it follows
> the same model as Veroboard (separate strips, with all the holes in each
> strip electrically joined).

http://www.allelectronics.com/cgi-bin/item/ECS-4/455/SOLDERABLE_PERF_BOARD,_LINE_PATTERN_.html

$5.50 for a ~4" x 6" board.  Good quality.
--
Timothy J. Weber
http://timothyweber.org

2006\03\15@162844 by Wouter van Ooijen

face picon face
> No, not really.  But even if I had, I don't think that I would have
> picked up on the fact that clicking on the UK flag would change  the
> language to English.  I don't really think of the UK as an
> English-speaking country.  :-)
>
> At any rate, I now know, and guess others do too, so that is a good  
> thing.

But it is not a good thing that I use a mechansim that failed the
'novice customer test' :(

What would you recognise as a 'switch language' button?

Wouter van Ooijen

-- -------------------------------------------
Van Ooijen Technische Informatica: http://www.voti.nl
consultancy, development, PICmicro products
docent Hogeschool van Utrecht: http://www.voti.nl/hvu


2006\03\15@164229 by Jan-Erik Soderholm

face picon face
Wouter van Ooijen wrote :

> What would you recognise as a 'switch language' button?

A US flag ? :-)

Jan-Erik.



2006\03\15@171027 by John Nall

picon face
Wouter van Ooijen wrote:
> > What would you recognise as a 'switch language' button?
>  
.
I'm not really sure that you should use me as a test case, since I might
be more stupid than average.   But since you ask, then I will answer:  A
button that said "English" on it would be fairly recognizable by even
the most dense, I would think.  Probably all of your European customers
would recognize the flag bit immediately, I imagine, but we are a bit
more isolationist over here (and getting worse instead of better. :-(

2006\03\15@172018 by William Killian

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> -----Original Message-----
> From: .....piclist-bouncesKILLspamspam@spam@mit.edu [piclist-bouncesspamKILLspammit.edu] On
Behalf
{Quote hidden}

I guess I'm a more internationalist web browser than some as I'm used to
the flags as language change.  I've seen a bunch of pages that have a
combination of the Union Jack with the US flag for English when they
know their 'market' is not just European.  Not speaking Spanish or
Portuguese so much, I don't remember if they had Spain alone or with
some Latin American flags or if Portuguese was Portugal with Brazil.



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2006\03\15@172928 by John Nall

picon face
William Killian wrote:
> > I guess I'm a more internationalist web browser than some as I'm used to
> the flags as language change.  I've seen a bunch of pages that have a
> combination of the Union Jack with the US flag for English when they
> know their 'market' is not just European.  Not speaking Spanish or
> Portuguese so much, I don't remember if they had Spain alone or with
> some Latin American flags or if Portuguese was Portugal with Brazil.
>  
.
I would venture to say that a lot of Americans (including me) do not
really even know what the flags of other countries look like.  That is
not a good thing, of course, but I'll bet a dollar to a doughnut (Krispy
Kreme) that it is true.  :-)

2006\03\15@174751 by olin piclist

face picon face
John Nall wrote:
> I would venture to say that a lot of Americans (including me) do not
> really even know what the flags of other countries look like.  That is
> not a good thing, of course, but I'll bet a dollar to a doughnut
> (Krispy Kreme) that it is true.  :-)

I think most americans would recognize a Canadian flag.  There is reasonable
chance of the English (British?) flag with the big X thru it.  The old
soviet flag would be widely recognized, but to be honest I have no idea what
a modern Russian flag looks like.  Otherwise far too many countries have
three horizontal stripes with only the colors or some emblem to tell them
apart.  I couldn't tell you what country a single one of them belonged to.

Maybe flags should have an icon of something characteristic of that country
on them so everyone could recognize it.  The maple leaf on the Canadian flag
is a good start.  The Italians could have a pizza, and the french a bottle
of wine, the dutch a tulip.  Others get harder though, how do you make a
recognizable icon of a scam artist for the libyan flag?  And the russian
vodka bottle might look too much like the french wine bottle.


******************************************************************
Embed Inc, Littleton Massachusetts, (978) 742-9014.  #1 PIC
consultant in 2004 program year.  http://www.embedinc.com/products

2006\03\15@180205 by John Nall

picon face
Olin Lathrop wrote:
> > Maybe flags should have an icon of something characteristic of that country
> on them so everyone could recognize it.  The maple leaf on the Canadian flag
> is a good start.  The Italians could have a pizza, and the french a bottle
> of wine, the dutch a tulip.  Others get harder though, how do you make a
> recognizable icon of a scam artist for the libyan flag?  And the russian
> vodka bottle might look too much like the french wine bottle.
>  
.
What would you suggest for the U.S. flag???  (And I think that Nigeria
would get the scam artist icon, hands down).


2006\03\15@191227 by William Killian

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face


> -----Original Message-----
> From: EraseMEpiclist-bouncesspam_OUTspamTakeThisOuTmit.edu [piclist-bouncesspamspam_OUTmit.edu] On
Behalf
> Of Olin Lathrop
> Sent: Wednesday, March 15, 2006 5:48 PM
> To: Microcontroller discussion list - Public.
> Subject: Re: [BUY] Want to buy some stripboard
>
> John Nall wrote:
> > I would venture to say that a lot of Americans (including me) do not
> > really even know what the flags of other countries look like.  That
is
> > not a good thing, of course, but I'll bet a dollar to a doughnut
> > (Krispy Kreme) that it is true.  :-)
>
> I think most americans would recognize a Canadian flag.  There is
> reasonable
> chance of the English (British?) flag with the big X thru it.  The old
> soviet flag would be widely recognized, but to be honest I have no
idea
> what
> a modern Russian flag looks like.  Otherwise far too many countries
have
> three horizontal stripes with only the colors or some emblem to tell
them
> apart.  I couldn't tell you what country a single one of them belonged
to.
>
> Maybe flags should have an icon of something characteristic of that
> country
> on them so everyone could recognize it.  The maple leaf on the
Canadian
> flag
> is a good start.  The Italians could have a pizza, and the french a
bottle
> of wine, the dutch a tulip.  Others get harder though, how do you make
a
> recognizable icon of a scam artist for the libyan flag?  And the
russian
> vodka bottle might look too much like the french wine bottle.

But the good thing is all you'd care about is your own flag.

Would you need to know the Russian flag is three strips that happen to
be the same colors as the French in a different orientation and order?
Nope.  Just your own flag.  (well if it's the US/UK flag mixed thing)

You couldn't read the Russian anyway so why would you care which flag is
Russia's and which is France's?




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2006\03\15@192827 by Bob Blick

face picon face

> Maybe flags should have an icon of something characteristic of that
> country
> on them so everyone could recognize it.  The maple leaf on the Canadian
> flag
> is a good start.

How about just a map of your hemisphere with your country highlighted, and
the name of the country printed at the bottom? It'd be good for geography
students!

Oh, and while we're at it, put the country's two-letter domain on there.

Cheers,

Bob


2006\03\15@204855 by Chris Levin

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face
Timothy Weber wrote:

>John Nall wrote:
>  
>
>>I need about a half dozen or so stripboards for a project.  I prefer
>>Veroboard, but anything along that line will do, so long as it follows
>>the same model as Veroboard (separate strips, with all the holes in each
>>strip electrically joined).
>>    
>>
>
>http://www.allelectronics.com/cgi-bin/item/ECS-4/455/SOLDERABLE_PERF_BOARD,_LINE_PATTERN_.html
>
>$5.50 for a ~4" x 6" board.  Good quality.
>  
>
Hi,

Just to add my thoughts. This link,
http://www.futurlec.com/ProtoBoards.shtml , has several types of proto
boards - different sizes and styles - for a good price.

-Chris

2006\03\15@214119 by Timothy Weber

face picon face
Chris Levin wrote:
>> www.allelectronics.com/cgi-bin/item/ECS-4/455/SOLDERABLE_PERF_BOARD,_LINE_PATTERN_.html
>>
>> $5.50 for a ~4" x 6" board.  Good quality.

> Just to add my thoughts. This link,
> http://www.futurlec.com/ProtoBoards.shtml , has several types of proto
> boards - different sizes and styles - for a good price.

Looks good, and cheaper too.  I like the breadboard pattern; might be
nice for simply transferring a breadboard design directly to a
less-fragile substrate.

Note that the ones I linked to at All Electronics, though more
expensive, are also tinned; the ones at Futurlec appear to be just
copper, so harder to solder to and will corrode over time.

Good to have more options, though.

Incidentally, here's a question back to the list - does anyone sell
prototyping boards with matching enclosures?  I've heard Radio Shack
used to have some standard sizes, but no more.  Futurlec sells exactly
one enclosure, and it seems like it might fit their small stripboard,
but it's hard to tell for sure.  I don't get why no one sells a whole
system that works together.
--
Timothy J. Weber
http://timothyweber.org

2006\03\15@221426 by William Couture

face picon face
On 3/15/06, John Nall <KILLspamjwnallKILLspamspamgmail.com> wrote:

>  I'll bet a dollar to a doughnut (Krispy Kreme) that it is true.  :-)

So, which is it, a doughnut or a Krispy Kreme?  I've had both,
and they aren't related...

Bill

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Psst...  Hey, you... Buddy...  Want a kitten?  straycatblues.petfinder.org

2006\03\15@222823 by Charles Craft

picon face
I think this expression pre-dates most of us on the list.

With the prices at Krispy Kreme it's about a wash now. :-p

{Original Message removed}

2006\03\16@065150 by olin piclist

face picon face
Bob Blick wrote:
> Oh, and while we're at it, put the country's two-letter domain on there.

While we're at it, why not change two letter domains to at least three
letter domains for countries?  Who's the rocket scientist that decided
letters were so expensive that we couldn't have a third despite the far more
intuitive abbreviations that could be formed?  Two letter abreviations for
the 50 US states was bad enough (think of how many different states could
reasonably have the abbreviation MA, you just have to know which one they
picked), but using a two letter system for the hundreds of countries was
just boneheaded.


******************************************************************
Embed Inc, Littleton Massachusetts, (978) 742-9014.  #1 PIC
consultant in 2004 program year.  http://www.embedinc.com/products

2006\03\17@023053 by Peter

picon face

> What would you recognise as a 'switch language' button?

Language ? What do you mean, 'language' ? Oh, them fo'eign slangs ?

Peter

2006\03\17@112335 by Howard Winter

face
flavicon
picon face
John,

On Wed, 15 Mar 2006 16:11:01 -0500, John Nall wrote:

> I don't really think of the UK as an English-speaking country.  :-)

Well the clue is in the name...

Howcome you don't call your language "American", anyway?

Cheers,


Howard Winter
St.Albans, England


2006\03\17@113852 by John Nall

picon face
Howard Winter wrote:
>> > I don't really think of the UK as an English-speaking country.  :-)
>>    
>
> Well the clue is in the name..
.
Well, as usual, the Brits have no sense of humor.  I put a smiley face
after the comment, meaning that it was said in jest.  :-)

2006\03\17@122143 by William Killian

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face


> -----Original Message-----
> From: RemoveMEpiclist-bouncesTakeThisOuTspammit.edu [spamBeGonepiclist-bouncesspamBeGonespammit.edu] On
Behalf
{Quote hidden}

United?  Or Kingdom?  <g>


> Howcome you don't call your language "American", anyway?

Well some of us speak southern.  And some Yankee.  Others Spanglish.
Sort of the anti-UK.  Not united and not a kingdom.



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2006\03\17@122441 by Howard Winter

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oLIN,

On Wed, 15 Mar 2006 17:47:47 -0500, Olin Lathrop wrote:

> John Nall wrote:
> > I would venture to say that a lot of Americans (including me) do not
> > really even know what the flags of other countries look like.  That is
> > not a good thing, of course, but I'll bet a dollar to a doughnut
> > (Krispy Kreme) that it is true.  :-)

I haven't checked the price of them in the US, but in the UK, when you can find them, a Krispy Kreme doughnut
is the equivalent of about US$2...

> I think most americans would recognize a Canadian flag.  There is reasonable
> chance of the English (British?) flag with the big X thru it.  

The English flag is the cross of St.George (white background, red orthoganal cross - think of the crusaders'
carrying or wearing them).  The Union Flag (often incorrectly called the Union Jack) is a combination of this
and the crosses of St.Andrew (Scotland) and St.Patrick (Ireland).  Wales isn't shown, because it is a
principality, not a separate country as such.  Good job too, because their emblem is a dragon, and that
wouldn't fit with the crosses very easily at all!  :-)

>The old
> soviet flag would be widely recognized, but to be honest I have no idea what
> a modern Russian flag looks like.

Off the top of my head I want to say it's red/white/blue, with one of them veing a triangle on the flagpole
side, but I could be completely wrong.

> Otherwise far too many countries have
> three horizontal stripes with only the colors or some emblem to tell them
> apart.  I couldn't tell you what country a single one of them belonged to.

Actually about half of the "old Eurpoean" countries have the stripes vertical - although the Netherlands is
like the French flag but turned horizontal. Belgium is black-gold-red, Italy green-white-red, Ireland
green-white-orange.  Germany is horizontal, black-red-gold though.  Scandinavian countries have an eccentric
cross, with various colourings.  Most people will know the Swiss flag as it's on all their army-knives!  :-)  
(Also on the tail of all their aircraft).

> Maybe flags should have an icon of something characteristic of that country
> on them so everyone could recognize it.

Most of them come from some sort of symbolism, now lost in history.  Their origin was mostly in
battle-colours, and artistry wasn't prevalent enough to have complex pictures.  Even then, mistakes were made
(in the Battle of Barnet, one part of one army mistook an allied unit for the enemy because of similar
coloured arms, and attacked them, which contributed to the defeat of that side).

> The maple leaf on the Canadian flag
> is a good start.  The Italians could have a pizza, and the french a bottle
> of wine, the dutch a tulip.  Others get harder though, how do you make a
> recognizable icon of a scam artist for the libyan flag?  And the russian
> vodka bottle might look too much like the french wine bottle.

Oh I think you can be much more cruel than that - an upturned nose for France, a white flag and a pair of
running shoes for Italy, an ascending trail of Zs for Spain, a circle of people all picking the pocket of the
one in front for Nigeria, a crossed-out rugby ball and cricket bat for England to signify the sports in which
the former colonies are trouncing us, or perhaps a field of all the Olympic medals with an arrow pointing to
one silver (our score in the last lot).  For the USA perhaps a $ sign with a pair of hands grabbing for it...

(rather jetlagged, I might not have posted this if my higher brain functions were less befuddled...)

Cheers,


Howard Winter
St.Albans, England


2006\03\17@125015 by Howard Winter

face
flavicon
picon face
Olin,

On Thu, 16 Mar 2006 06:52:53 -0500, Olin Lathrop wrote:

> Bob Blick wrote:
> > Oh, and while we're at it, put the country's two-letter domain on there.
>
> While we're at it, why not change two letter domains to at least three
> letter domains for countries?

Is there actually a country-domain for the USA?  I've never seen one - it seems to be that when it's missing
(.COM etc) then you assume the US.

> Who's the rocket scientist that decided
> letters were so expensive that we couldn't have a third despite the far more
> intuitive abbreviations that could be formed?

Good question - I have no idea which committee has the job, but I'm sure they are pleased with themselves!  
:-)

> Two letter abreviations for
> the 50 US states was bad enough (think of how many different states could
> reasonably have the abbreviation MA, you just have to know which one they
> picked), but using a two letter system for the hundreds of countries was
> just boneheaded.

It really ought to be variable-length, because 2 letters makes perfect sense for some places (uk, nl) since
the place-name is two words, and there isn't an obvious third letter.  Incidentally, I notice that some
countries don't use a sub-domain, so Wouter's site is voti.nl, whereas in the UK we have .gov.uk, .org.uk,
.co.uk etc.  (The same letter-miser you mention obviously trimmed the "m" from "com" for the latter :-)

The problem with US States is the popularity of "M" as an initial.  Even with 3 letters solving some (MON,
MAS) you'd still have a problem with MIS - is it -SISSIPPI or -OURI?  :-)

While we're on Massachusetts, I've noticed that Computer Geeks (in California) sometimes drop-ship products
direct from the manufacturer, and say: "This item ships directly from the manufacturer via FedEx and may be
shipped ONLY to the 50 United States, EXCLUDING Massachusetts."  Why would this be?  Is there some strange law
that prevents FedEx operating there?

Cheers,


Howard Winter
St.Albans, England


2006\03\17@125111 by olin piclist

face picon face
Howard Winter wrote:
> Oh I think you can be much more cruel than that - an upturned nose for
> France, a white flag and a pair of running shoes for Italy, an
> ascending trail of Zs for Spain, a circle of people all picking the
> pocket of the one in front for Nigeria, a crossed-out rugby ball and
> cricket bat for England to signify the sports in which the former
> colonies are trouncing us, or perhaps a field of all the Olympic medals
> with an arrow pointing to one silver (our score in the last lot).  For
> the USA perhaps a $ sign with a pair of hands grabbing for it...

Good ones!  I was afraid I'd get trounced on if I said stuff like that, but
that's a lot closer to what I was really thinking.  I see the impression of
various nationalities over there is not that different from here.  I didn't
know the french were uppity to others too.  Here's a few more:

Poland: Three guys, a ladder, and a lightbulb.

Israel: A guy with wearing a yamucca (sp?), an old testament in one hand and
an ouzi in the other.
Siria: A guy with wearing a prayer cap, a koran in one hand and an ouzi in
the other.

Mexico: A guy napping under a shade tree wearing a poncho, head covered by
wide sombrero.

South Africa: Left half black, right half white, easily tears down the
middle.

China: Five people all eating from the same small bowl of rice.


******************************************************************
Embed Inc, Littleton Massachusetts, (978) 742-9014.  #1 PIC
consultant in 2004 program year.  http://www.embedinc.com/products

2006\03\17@125733 by Howard Winter

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flavicon
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On Fri, 17 Mar 2006 12:22:01 -0500, William Killian wrote:

> > -----Original Message-----
> > From: RemoveMEpiclist-bouncesspamTakeThisOuTmit.edu [piclist-bouncesEraseMEspam.....mit.edu] On
> Behalf
> > Of Howard Winter
> > Sent: Friday, March 17, 2006 11:24 AM
> > To: Microcontroller discussion list - Public.
> > Subject: Re: [BUY] Want to buy some stripboard
> >
> > John,
> >
> > On Wed, 15 Mar 2006 16:11:01 -0500, John Nall wrote:
> >
> > > I don't really think of the UK as an English-speaking country.  :-)
> >
> > Well the clue is in the name...
>
> United?  Or Kingdom?  <g>

"The United Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern Ireland"!  :-)  

Of course, you have to know that "Great Britain" is the name of the island that comprises England, Scotland,
and Wales...

> > Howcome you don't call your language "American", anyway?
>
> Well some of us speak southern.  And some Yankee.  Others Spanglish.

...but no actual "English"... ;-)

> Sort of the anti-UK.  Not united and not a kingdom.

Ah, but the "United Kingdom" is where the Scots hate the English, the Irish hate each other, and everyone
hates the Welsh!  :-)))

Cheers,


Howard Winter
St.Albans, England


2006\03\17@134246 by Herbert Graf

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On Fri, 2006-03-17 at 17:50 +0000, Howard Winter wrote:
> It really ought to be variable-length, because 2 letters makes perfect sense for some places (uk, nl) since
> the place-name is two words, and there isn't an obvious third letter.  Incidentally, I notice that some
> countries don't use a sub-domain, so Wouter's site is voti.nl, whereas in the UK we have .gov.uk, .org.uk,
> .co.uk etc.  (The same letter-miser you mention obviously trimmed the "m" from "com" for the latter :-)

Variable length wouldn't be a bad idea.

The subdomain idea seems to have been dropped in Canada. There was a
time that if you wanted a URL ending in .ca you would only be allowed to
have on that also included the province you are in. So if you were
located in ontario you would only be allowed to have: .on.ca

Became very annoying, and was completely without reason. They eventually
dropped it, now anyone can get a .ca domain.

TTYL

-----------------------------
Herbert's PIC Stuff:
http://repatch.dyndns.org:8383/pic_stuff/

2006\03\17@142829 by William Killian

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> -----Original Message-----
> From: EraseMEpiclist-bouncesspammit.edu [RemoveMEpiclist-bouncesEraseMEspamEraseMEmit.edu] On
Behalf
{Quote hidden}

:-)
> > >
> > > Well the clue is in the name...
> >
> > United?  Or Kingdom?  <g>
>
> "The United Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern Ireland"!  :-)
>
> Of course, you have to know that "Great Britain" is the name of the
island
> that comprises England, Scotland,
> and Wales...

Well yeah but it was UK not UKGBNI.  Which again has no direct
England/English in the name.

>
> > > Howcome you don't call your language "American", anyway?
> >
> > Well some of us speak southern.  And some Yankee.  Others Spanglish.
>
> ...but no actual "English"... ;-)

You've heard us - politicians, athletes and entertainers.  Does that
sound like English?

> > Sort of the anti-UK.  Not united and not a kingdom.
>
> Ah, but the "United Kingdom" is where the Scots hate the English, the
> Irish hate each other, and everyone
> hates the Welsh!  :-)))

Oh so you are like us.  Substitute Yankee for Scot.  Southerner for
English and Californian for Welsh. (sorta)

We have a couple Brits working here and I'm working with a Scottish
company on a new project.  How do you guys understand the Scots?  Or do
you?

Tongue firmly in cheek and not intending any real insult...


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2006\03\17@143656 by Wouter van Ooijen

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>> Oh I think you can be much more cruel than that - an
>> upturned nose for France

> didn't know the french were uppity to others too.

Definitly!

but no-one mentions the Netherlands? Maybe a big question mark :(
(Netherlands? is that a country?)

Wouter van Ooijen

-- -------------------------------------------
Van Ooijen Technische Informatica: http://www.voti.nl
consultancy, development, PICmicro products
docent Hogeschool van Utrecht: http://www.voti.nl/hvu


2006\03\17@144352 by John Nall

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Wouter van Ooijen wrote:
> >  but no-one mentions the Netherlands? Maybe a big question mark :(
> (Netherlands? is that a country?)
>  
The icon for that would be a no-brainer -- a boy, in a flat cap, on
ice-skates, with his finger in a dike.  :-)

And since no one has suggested an icon for the U.S. I'll go out on a
limb (and probably James & Cohorts will chop the limb off, too!).  A
picture of a bull in a china shop.

John

2006\03\17@144707 by D. Jay Newman

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> We have a couple Brits working here and I'm working with a Scottish
> company on a new project.  How do you guys understand the Scots?  Or do
> you?

You try to understand somebody from the nation that popularized bagpipes? :)
--
D. Jay Newman           ! Author of:
RemoveMEjayKILLspamspamsprucegrove.com     ! _Linux Robotics: Building Smarter Robots_
http://enerd.ws/robots/ ! (Now I can get back to building robots.)

2006\03\17@151046 by Paul Hutchinson

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> -----Original Message-----
> From: piclist-bouncesSTOPspamspamspam_OUTmit.edu On Behalf Of Howard Winter
> Sent: Friday, March 17, 2006 12:50 PM
>
> Is there actually a country-domain for the USA?  I've never seen
> one - it seems to be that when it's missing
> (.COM etc) then you assume the US.
>

Yes we have a country domain, it is .US. It is not used much although some
have used it very creatively e.g. http://del.icio.us/.

>
> While we're on Massachusetts, I've noticed that Computer Geeks
> (in California) sometimes drop-ship products
> direct from the manufacturer, and say: "This item ships directly
> from the manufacturer via FedEx and may be
> shipped ONLY to the 50 United States, EXCLUDING Massachusetts."
> Why would this be?  Is there some strange law
> that prevents FedEx operating there?
>

I suspect Computer Geeks is not charging MA sales tax and that the
manufacturers are either located in MA or have an agreement with MA to
charge sales tax on internet purchases.

Paul

2006\03\17@153821 by Bob Axtell

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D. Jay Newman wrote:

>>We have a couple Brits working here and I'm working with a Scottish
>>company on a new project.  How do you guys understand the Scots?  Or do
>>you?
>>    
>>
>
>You try to understand somebody from the nation that popularized bagpipes? :)
>  
>
yes, and they think that din is MUSIC?

and they invented a game where everybody has their own ball? and after
they hit it, they pick it
up again unless they lost it?

--Bob

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2006\03\17@160014 by D. Jay Newman

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> >>We have a couple Brits working here and I'm working with a Scottish
> >>company on a new project.  How do you guys understand the Scots?  Or do
> >>you?
> >
> >You try to understand somebody from the nation that popularized bagpipes? :)
> >  
> >
> yes, and they think that din is MUSIC?

Strangely enough, even though I make bagpipe jokes, I like the sound
of a well played bagpipe. If you can find Silly Wizard cds they have
some very nice bagpipe sections.

> and they invented a game where everybody has their own ball? and after
> they hit it, they pick it
> up again unless they lost it?

Well, I did laugh when I saw the book _Dummy's Guide to Golf_. :)

And I wasn't even going to mention haggis...
--
D. Jay Newman           ! Author of:
KILLspamjayspamBeGonespamsprucegrove.com     ! _Linux Robotics: Building Smarter Robots_
http://enerd.ws/robots/ ! (Now I can get back to building robots.)

2006\03\17@171909 by Howard Winter

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Bill,

On Fri, 17 Mar 2006 14:29:20 -0500, William Killian wrote:
>...
> We have a couple Brits working here and I'm working with a Scottish
> company on a new project.  How do you guys understand the Scots?  Or do
> you?

Well I can understand my sister-in-law, who's from Edinburgh, but given an unfavourable combination of where
they are from, how strong is the accent, and how fast they speak, no, I can't understand a word!  :-)

Geordies (from the Newcastle area, North-East England) are even harder to understand, because even the
intonation is "wrong" - they sound like they're asking a question whatever thay say, which confused me greatly
when I was a kid because my grandmother was from there, and I felt I ought to answer her questions but had no
idea what she'd asked me...

Cheers,


Howard Winter
St.Albans, England


2006\03\17@172316 by Howard Winter

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Wouter,

On Fri, 17 Mar 2006 20:38:56 +0100, Wouter van Ooijen wrote:

>...
> but no-one mentions the Netherlands? Maybe a big question mark :(
> (Netherlands? is that a country?)

Well I know you stole the Luxembourg flag and turned it upside-down, rather than invent your own... :-)))

How about two naked people in the throws of passion, with a cannabis leaf covering the naughty bits?  ;-)

Cheers,



Howard Winter
St.Albans, England


2006\03\17@172729 by Wouter van Ooijen

face picon face
> Strangely enough, even though I make bagpipe jokes, I like the sound
> of a well played bagpipe. If you can find Silly Wizard cds they have
> some very nice bagpipe sections.

Good old times! I think I have an LP of them somewhere.

Wouter van Ooijen

-- -------------------------------------------
Van Ooijen Technische Informatica: http://www.voti.nl
consultancy, development, PICmicro products
docent Hogeschool van Utrecht: http://www.voti.nl/hvu


2006\03\17@192822 by D. Jay Newman

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> > Strangely enough, even though I make bagpipe jokes, I like the sound
> > of a well played bagpipe. If you can find Silly Wizard cds they have
> > some very nice bagpipe sections.
>
> Good old times! I think I have an LP of them somewhere.

Yes, and John Stewart did some on his own. I saw him both with Silly Wizard
and on his own (well, with Manus Lunney) and they were great.

For now, I'd recommend the Saw Doctors for modern Celtic music. For
just strange wierdness, I'd go with The Flash Girls.
--
D. Jay Newman           ! Author of:
EraseMEjayspamEraseMEsprucegrove.com     ! _Linux Robotics: Building Smarter Robots_
http://enerd.ws/robots/ ! (Now I can get back to building robots.)

2006\03\17@212857 by Mike Hord

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> > I don't really think of the UK as an English-speaking country.  :-)
>
> Well the clue is in the name...
>
> Howcome you don't call your language "American", anyway?

Simple:  good emigrants keep their native tongue.

GREAT emigrants steal it!

Mike H.

2006\03\18@110646 by Jan-Erik Soderholm

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About the 2 character top domain codes...

If I'm not wrong, they simply selected the common,
standard 2 character country codes as used everywhere else.

www.iso.org/iso/en/prods-services/iso3166ma/04background-on-iso-
3166/iso3166-2.html
www.iso.org/iso/en/prods-services/iso3166ma/02iso-3166-code-
lists/list-en1.html

Seems quite logical to me...

But then, if you use inch, lb, oz and so on,
why bother about standards... :-)

Best Regards,
Jan-Erik.



2006\03\18@132954 by Peter

picon face

> but no-one mentions the Netherlands? Maybe a big question mark :(
> (Netherlands? is that a country?)

Naw, it's a place where they make beer. And the flag says 'Heineken' in
the middle.

Peter

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